Brass Napoleon Award Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause--What the newspapers said: 1861-1865


Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

19thGeorgia

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Messages
2,928
I found a mention of newspaper articles used as sources in the book "The Negro as a Soldier" by Christian A. Fleetwood, himself a former Sergeant- Major in the 4th U. S. Colored Troops....
A telegram from New Orleans dated November 23, 1861, notes the review by Gov. Moore of over 28,000 troops, and that one regiment comprised "1,400 colored men."
Some were absent that day - either sick or out of town.
At least one was at Camp Magruder, Virginia.

Dorgan1.jpg

Dorgan2.jpg
 
Last edited:

Andersonh1

Major
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,967
Location
South Carolina
Some were absent that day - either sick or out of town.
At least one was at Camp Magruder, Virginia.

View attachment 302919
View attachment 302920
I wonder what the story is behind his presence in Virginia? A lot of men and a lot of weapons were sent out of Louisiana during 1861, to the point that the state was weakened too much to defend against the invasion in 1862. I wonder if portions of the Native Guard were sent out of state? I've never seen any indication of it before, but this makes me wonder. Nice find.
 

19thGeorgia

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Messages
2,928
I wonder what the story is behind his presence in Virginia? A lot of men and a lot of weapons were sent out of Louisiana during 1861, to the point that the state was weakened too much to defend against the invasion in 1862.
There are other mentions of fmc of New Orleans ("Captain Noble" etc) in Virginia, but I've never given it much credence.
I wonder if portions of the Native Guard were sent out of state?
I've never seen any order to that effect. Some may have volunteered to go of their own accord, but for what purpose I don't know. 14 others were reported that day as "out of the city."
 

lelliott19

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Messages
5,807
Why would this have written in "not dated?" Yet they have the capture date.
There are a lot of carded records marked that way. I have always interpreted it to mean that the referenced roll/roster from which the cards were copied was not dated. Most rolls of prisoners had the name, unit, date of capture, but the roster itself was not necessarily dated. Sometimes they sent whole lists of men captured over several days with the date of each man's capture, but didnt necessarily date the document.
 

NH Civil War Gal

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Feb 5, 2017
Messages
3,141
There are a lot of carded records marked that way. I have always interpreted it to mean that the referenced roll/roster from which the cards were copied was not dated. Most rolls of prisoners had the name, unit, date of capture, but the roster itself was not necessarily dated. Sometimes they sent whole lists of men captured over several days with the date of each man's capture, but didnt necessarily date the document.
That seems so odd to me that they wouldn't put the date in they were writing the roll/roster but go to the trouble of writing "not dated!" I'm such a stickler for things like that in my job that seeing that drives me crazy!
 

Andersonh1

Major
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,967
Location
South Carolina
Wasn't there a unit, IIRC the 1st Louisiana Native Guards, a free Black regiment, who offered their services to the Confederacy early in, or before the conflict, But was turned down? It seems I read something of that nature.

Respectfully,
William

One Nation
Two countries
View attachment 303028
There was a lot of newspaper coverage about them. They were actually a free black/Creole home guard or militia unit for the state of Louisiana, based in New Orleans. I haven't read anywhere that they offered their services to the national Confederate military, though like any other militia unit, they were subject to being a part of the CS military if ordered. A few individuals fought with various CS army units during the war, but the Native Guard as a group did not.

Here are a few samples of the press coverage they received.

New Orleans daily crescent. ([New Orleans, La.]) 1851-1866, April 27, 1861
lIxZhFH.jpg


St. Cloud Democrat. (Saint Cloud, Stearns County, Minn.) 1858-1866, May 30, 1861
bGG2Sf1.jpg


New Orleans daily crescent. ([New Orleans, La.]) 1851-1866, December 09, 1861
0ntXYcl.jpg
 

Andersonh1

Major
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,967
Location
South Carolina
From Montgomery Meigs' report. Keep in mind that this is the Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army saying this:

"The labor of the colored man supports the rebel soldier, enables him to leave his plantation to meet our armies, builds his fortifications, cooks his food, and sometimes aids him on picket by rare skill with the rifle."

The Nashville daily union. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1862-1866, February 20, 1863
qtrIpXF.jpg
 
Last edited:

Andersonh1

Major
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,967
Location
South Carolina
Part of the above article is reprinted, proof that someone at the Chicago Daily Tribune read the London Herald and that these stories made the rounds up north. The comments about "a regiment of blacks" is the portion of the most interest to him, and is the extract he reprints here:

Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1860-1864, December 19, 1861
Gj2u8B3.jpg
 


Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top