Brass Napoleon Award Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause--What the newspapers said: 1861-1865


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AshleyMel

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I've done some brief searching for information on this church based on how this letter is worded (".. among the colored membership of my church...") and there were indeed both white and black members of this church.

http://www.rrb3.com/PDF files/Camden Baptist Church minutes 1810 to 1838.pdf

The Camden confederate. (Camden, S.C.) 1861-1865, July 25, 1862
View attachment 301522
The Kershaw Ladies Aid Society was formed in July of 1861.
Clothing and supplies were sent to soldiers and hospitals for comfort aid during the war.
 
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A Southern newspaper reprints and comments on the report of another Southern newspaper.

The following from the Memphis Avalanche is a record of one of many instances in which negroes have fought the invaders. Many a Hessian has been made to bite the dust and sent to his long home by bullets from the guns of faithful slaves:​

Arkansas true Democrat. (Little Rock, Ark.) 1857-1862, December 05, 1861
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This article is packed with analysis and discussion. The main theme is familiar, and appeared over and over: the South employed black troops first, so why shouldn't we? This is not the first article we've seen that quotes Gov. Moore's orders in order to point out the hypocrisy of those criticizing Gen. Butler's establishment of a black regiment in New Orleans, with some of the same men and the same unit name.

"The South has not shown so much reluctance to put arms into the hands of colored men, and to use them for military purposes, as have the people of the North."

The Portland daily press. (Portland, Me.) 1862-1921, September 11, 1862
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I debated on whether to include this article, since it's about how the free black population were viewed rather than actions by that population. But it seems as relevant as articles about conscription. I find the apparent cognitive dissonance fascinating. Slavery was an accepted part of South Carolina society at this point, but the committee members in the SC House react very strongly against enslaving the free black population of South Carolina and confiscating their property, calling such an idea "against all justice".

"... Whilst we are battling for our rights, liberties, and institutions, can we expect the smiles and countenance of the Arbiter of all events, when we make war on the impotent and unprotected, enslave them against all justice, and rob them of the property acquired by their own honest toil and industry...."​

Juliet Signal. (Juliet [i.e., Joliet], Ill.) January 15, 1861
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