Brass Napoleon Award Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause--What the newspapers said: 1861-1865


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jgoodguy

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I do have a good number of post-war newspaper articles all throughout this thread. They often shed some light on wartime events and individuals, or tell us how these men were viewed in the decades after the war.

I've posted this particular story before, but it's worth revisiting this 1889 article about Eli Pickett, who received no mention that I can find in the newspapers during the war, but who fought and was wounded during the war, and shunned by other black men after the war ended, because they said he had fought to keep them in slavery. It was the attempt to obtain a pension for Eli Pickett that brought him into the public eye, as those who felt he deserved a pension wanted his story made public. They were successful in obtaining him a pension, despite the initial refusal by a judge.

The Times-Picayune, 10 Aug 1889
View attachment 298049

The gold leaf. September 19, 1889
View attachment 298050
Looks perfectly fine to me because it directly relates to a civil war event/person. If it were about a post-1869 monument or event without such a direct relation to the civil war, it needs to be in the reconstruction forum. I am not really concerned about 'off topic' as such. If you feel it is topical it is good.
 
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I've never seen someone use the CSA's enlistment of black troops for some historical parallel. Here, near the end of WW1, Germany's draft is compared to the CS taking black support and putting it in the ranks as demonstrating that they had reached the limit of their resources when it came to fighting men.

The Republican journal. [volume] (Belfast, Me.) 1829-current, August 09, 1917
8mIVmil.jpg
 
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It should be noted that papers that mention negroes fighting for the South are either northern papers or very late war (1865) Southern papers. It is rare to read a Southern account early in the war as it would challenge the notion that southern manhood could defend hearth and hone without the help of its negroes.
I've done a count for 1861 where there is a story that either talks about a black man volunteering to fight for the South, a regiment said to be willing to fight for the South is raised, or individual or group action is tied to a specific battle. I've not included in the count any generic "the south is arming black men" stories. I only used specific accounts for this. A couple of things to note here, and I've mentioned this before, stories about black volunteers for the South pretty much dry up after 1861, and the 1st Louisiana Native Guard get a lot of press in 1861, but much less in following years, so we'll see different results as the war goes on with those two categories removed. There are a few mentions of the 1st Louisiana in 1862-65, but not as many as in 1861.

While southern stories talk about companies of black men offering to fight, most of the southern accounts from an actual battle are stories of individuals, mainly slave but some free black men. The Northern accounts are from across the battlefield and often give larger numbers. If you want to know why the North believed the South was fielding black men to fight against them, one reason is all the stories from Southern papers in 1861. Some of the Northern articles are commentaries on these Southern stories, and at least one story talks about the South "bragging" about putting black men in the field.

Southern Accounts: 75
Northern Accounts: 55
Southern papers reprinting Northern Accounts: 3
Northern papers reprinting Southern Accounts: 20
 
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ebg12

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A collection of old newspaper articles noting that approx. 2000 black soldiers served in the Confederate Army does not prove
the argument that approx. 4 million black people living in the south were content with being slaves.

To paraphrase Lincoln "if slavery is such a noble institution, why don't I ever read in the newspapers about
a poor white farmer and his family 'banging on the door' of a rich plantation owner, and begging to become
slaves?"

Where are those articles?
 
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A collection of old newspaper articles noting that approx. 2000 black soldiers served in the Confederate Army does not prove the argument that approx. 4 million black people living in the south were content with being slaves.

To paraphrase Lincoln "if slavery is such a noble institution, why don't I ever read in the newspapers about a poor white farmer and his family 'banging on the door' of a rich plantation owner, and begging to become slaves?"

Where are those articles?
Where in the world did you get the idea that I was trying to prove anything of the sort? Wow. That idea came from your mind, not mine.

The purpose of this thread and my motivation for this research is stated in post #1:

With all the discussion about whether black men served as armed soldiers in the Confederate Army, I wanted to start researching contemporary accounts from the war years, 1861-1865, and see what made the newspapers. Thanks to the Library of Congress, there are huge amounts of old papers online, with a pretty good search engine, so it's not hard to find what the papers of the day said. So far I've found rumors, eyewitness accounts, editorials and random references. There was a range of opinion about the topic, just as there is today.​
The purpose of this thread is not to necessarily prove or disprove anything, it's to explore what the news of the day said about the concept. If you want to debate the existence of black Confederates, there are numerous other threads dedicated to that topic. While here, please confine discussion and commentary to posted articles and any observations you may have about them. Any supporting information that tells us about people, places or battles mentioned in an article is also welcome.​
 

19thGeorgia

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A collection of old newspaper articles noting that approx. 2000 black soldiers served in the Confederate Army does not prove the argument that approx. 4 million black people living in the south were content with being slaves.

Where are those articles?
If you want to prove that argument you'll have to start your own thread.
 

ebg12

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Where in the world did you get the idea that I was trying to prove anything of the sort? Wow. That idea came from your mind, not mine.

The purpose of this thread and my motivation for this research is stated in post #1:

With all the discussion about whether black men served as armed soldiers in the Confederate Army, I wanted to start researching contemporary accounts from the war years, 1861-1865, and see what made the newspapers. Thanks to the Library of Congress, there are huge amounts of old papers online, with a pretty good search engine, so it's not hard to find what the papers of the day said. So far I've found rumors, eyewitness accounts, editorials and random references. There was a range of opinion about the topic, just as there is today.​
The purpose of this thread is not to necessarily prove or disprove anything, it's to explore what the news of the day said about the concept. If you want to debate the existence of black Confederates, there are numerous other threads dedicated to that topic. While here, please confine discussion and commentary to posted articles and any observations you may have about them. Any supporting information that tells us about people, places or battles mentioned in an article is also welcome.​
I'm glad to hear that. Edited. Thanks
 

19thGeorgia

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New Orleans Times, February 28, 1867 (Wm. H. C. King was editor of the Times)-
The error and infatuation of the Radicals in regard to the loyalty and Unionism of the negroes during the late rebellion would be laughable and ludicrous, if the practical consequences of the delusion were not so grave and serious. Every man who lived in the South during the war, knew that during the prevalence of the enthusiasm for "the independence of the South," and indeed, so long as this country was held by the Confederates, there was no class of our population, which was more clamorous and earnest for the war against the so-called invading "Yankees" than our colored people, "bond and free." When volunteer companies were being raised, the slaves clustered around their masters and entreated permission to accompany them to the field. Many ran away to join their masters or the sons of their masters, and served with them during the war. The armies of the Confederacy were cumbered by crowds of them. They would have volunteered en masse if they had been called on to fight under "the Bonnie blue flag." When they were refused, the great majority of them remained at home to protect and support the families of their masters whilst they were absent in the field. To aid the Confederate cause they volunteered by thousands, whilst the great majority of those who afterwards joined the Federal armies were either pressed or inveigled into the service.
….
We refer to these among a thousand similar incidents, not with any expectation that they will arrest or correct one of the myriad of fictions of which the histories and the political harangues and partisan theories of the day are chiefly composed--but merely to refresh and keep alive facts that may serve a useful purpose and aid to the honest historian in the future, who may seek to give to posterity the true version of the events of the last five years of excitement, madness and fanaticism.
 
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WJC

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***Posted as Moderator***
A reminder: "The purpose of this thread is not to necessarily prove or disprove anything, it's to explore what the news of the day said about the concept. If you want to debate the existence of black Confederates, there are numerous other threads dedicated to that topic. While here, please confine discussion and commentary to posted articles and any observations you may have about them. Any supporting information that tells us about people, places or battles mentioned in an article is also welcome."
Please stay within these simple boundaries.
 



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