Brass Napoleon Award Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause--What the newspapers said: 1861-1865


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Here's an interesting suggestion: that Jefferson Davis should "offer by proclamation freedom to every Southern negro who is enlisted in the Yankee army...". "Hegira" is a reference to Mohammed fleeing Mecca for Medina, so the writer is envisioning here a mass exodus of black men from the Union army back to the South.

The Camden journal. [volume] (Camden, S.C.) 1864-1864, January 01, 1864
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"We are informed that Mr. F. C. Hale, of Autauga county, yesterday tendered to Governor Moore the services of a company of negroes, to assist in driving back the horde of abolition sycophants who are now talking so flippantly of reducing to a conquered province the Confederate States of the South. He agrees to command them himself, and guarantees that they will do effective service."

Weekly standard. volume (Raleigh, N.C.) 1858-1865, May 01, 1861
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Similar report to the one above, different take on it. The Pilot is using the fact that 1500 free black men are armed and organized for Louisiana to argue against the Gazette's assertion that slaves would rebel in case of war. I guess the idea is meant to be that if free blacks would fight for the South, so would slaves.

The Manitowoc pilot. (Manitowoc, Wis.) 1859-1932, June 14, 1861
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I think I have finally found the source of the "two black regiments in Centreville" stories: a contraband who appears to have his facts garbled, assuming the New York Tribune indeed talked to such a man and quoted him accurately. For example, "Old Jordan" was in New Orleans, not Virginia, and neither side let black troops have "colored officers". It makes me wonder what kernel of truth this exaggerated report was based on?

The daily Wabash express. (Terre-Haute, Ind.) 1857-1867, December 19, 1861
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19thGeorgia

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I think I have finally found the source of the "two black regiments in Centreville" stories: a contraband who appears to have his facts garbled, assuming the New York Tribune indeed talked to such a man and quoted him accurately. For example, "Old Jordan" was in New Orleans, not Virginia, and neither side let black troops have "colored officers". It makes me wonder what kernel of truth this exaggerated report was based on?

The daily Wabash express. (Terre-Haute, Ind.) 1857-1867, December 19, 1861
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The "two black regiments in Centreville" may have originated with the escaped slave John Parker.
 
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Another contraband gives his story. This man is identified as Middleton, a slave of B. B. Foster of Spartanburg (not sure if the spelling in the article is the correct contemporary spelling or not) and he is one of three who escaped to Union lines. All three escaped slaves were from upstate South Carolina, and I appreciate the specifics here, as opposed to the generalities we often get in this type of report. Compare it with the unnamed Contraband's report in post 2874 above.

Cincinnati daily press. (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1860-1862, September 12, 1861
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