Brass Napoleon Award Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause--What the newspapers said: 1861-1865


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Another state discusses enrollment of free black men into "military service of Virginia" two years before the Confederate Congress took that step with slaves, once again demonstrating that the states took action independent of the general government.

And then there's Mr. Rives, who would just turn all the free black men into slaves and be done with it.

Evening star. (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 10, 1862
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@19thGeorgia I found the full article, though the text search engine did not locate it. I went by your citation and had to visually scan the pages until I found the right article. Found another one as well. It makes me wonder just how much I've missed that the search engine has not picked up.

It's also worth noting that if an article like this were written today, it would no doubt use the term "black confederates" rather than "negro confederates", so the period-equivalent term was in use in 1902.

Richmond dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1884-1903, October 04, 1902
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jgoodguy

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The items in the post are just a starting point for further research.
I have no problem with that idea, but we should not jump to a point without that research.
Research threads are free to start. It has been done before. That allows articles to be posted here without disturbance and rough and tumble threads to discuss.
 
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I find this interesting, because not only had the 1st Louisiana organized by this time, but free and slave labor had been in use on fortifications on the coasts and inland. This is also after 1st Manassas, and there were plenty of accounts of black men participating in various ways in that battle. So was the Secretary of War unaware of any of this? The reports were known, or he would not have been asked, so perhaps the story simply means that he could not verify any of them.

Regardless, this does demonstrate that reports of black southern soldiers were taken seriously enough that questions were being asked of government officials in an attempt to determine the truth of the reports.

The New York herald. (New York [N.Y.]) 1840-1920, July 28, 1861
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19thGeorgia

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I have no problem with that idea, but we should not jump to a point without that research.
Research threads are free to start. It has been done before. That allows articles to be posted here without disturbance and rough and tumble threads to discuss.
Next thing to do is find out what sort of CS government installations were at Greensboro and Salisbury. Of course, Salisbury had a POW camp and Stoneman mentions destroying munitions and supplies at the place so there may have been a large number of slaves working there. I have a copy of a Greensboro newspaper (a weekly) for April 6, 1865, but have not examined it yet.
 

jgoodguy

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Next thing to do is find out what sort of CS government installations were at Greensboro and Salisbury. Of course, Salisbury had a POW camp and Stoneman mentions destroying munitions and supplies at the place so there may have been a large number of slaves working there. I have a copy of a Greensboro newspaper (a weekly) for April 6, 1865, but have not examined it yet.
Yes, but as this is not a newspaper article, put it in a new thread, please.
 

19thGeorgia

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Next thing to do is find out what sort of CS government installations were at Greensboro and Salisbury. Of course, Salisbury had a POW camp and Stoneman mentions destroying munitions and supplies at the place so there may have been a large number of slaves working there. I have a copy of a Greensboro newspaper (a weekly) for April 6, 1865, but have not examined it yet.
There was a Camp of Instruction at Greensboro established in October 1864. It was called Camp Stokes.
Afaik there were only two such camps in the state - Camp Holmes in Raleigh and the one in Greensboro.

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