Brass Napoleon Award Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause--What the newspapers said: 1861-1865


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
Dec 20, 2018
Messages
8
Location
Fairmont, WV
Is that William Mack Lee?

The Monroe journal. (Monroe, N.C.) November 12, 1920
View attachment 215348
Greetings, was a little busy enjoying Christmas vacation in Florida.
Well, it MIGHT be Mack Lee. There are some differences in the facial features, but it’s difficult to tell. I’m in the middle of doing some research on the topic, which will be appearing in a newsletter this month.
Thank you for the guess, I’d never seen that newspaper article before.
 

19thGeorgia

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Messages
2,780
While browsing in a Florida used book store today on vacation, I happened upon this photo in the book “The Chesapeake Bay Country”, published in 1924. It is in a set of photos at the back of the book, and is captioned “General Lee’s Bodyguard singing ‘Dixie’ at a Confederate reunion”. I’m originally from the Tidewater area of Virginia so I couldn’t resist buying the book. The photos don’t seem to be connected to anything in the text, though it is over 500 pages long so it may be. I am VERY curious about this photo and who this gentleman was. He appears to be festooned in medals and decorations. The Lees were from Westmoreland County (where my ancestors are from too, incidentally), so it is very possible he was too.

View attachment 215199
Is that William Mack Lee?

The Monroe journal. (Monroe, N.C.) November 12, 1920
View attachment 215348
It does look llike him.

MackMaybe.jpg

MackLee.jpg
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,825
Location
South Carolina
To make the same point, here is something I've posted before, an act by the Tennessee legislature less than three months after Fort Sumter stating "free persons of color shall be required to do all such menial service for the relief of the volunteers as is incident to camp life, and necessary to the efficiency of the service... (sec. 1)"

These men could be impressed by sheriffs (sec. 7), though they were paid (sec. 3), and officers had to see that they did "not suffer from neglect or maltreatment (sec. 6). In July of 1861, a Confederate state began impressing black labor into the military, without any regard to the opinion of the national government.

Nashville union and American. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1853-1862, July 07, 1861
w0nLPdm.jpg
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,825
Location
South Carolina
There's no "combat" or "argument" in my response, i.e. "a state was not more enlightened or progressive than the national government just because it played it's negro labor card before the national government was impelled to do so."
Again, that's what you read into it, not what I said or implied. Here's my point: the national CS government did not have the final say on the composition of all military within the Confederate States. The states themselves passed laws and otherwise determined how their state troops/militia/home guards were composed, including support and defensive labor. It's nothing to do with being progressive or enlightened, it has to do with pointing out the flaws some here have in thinking of the CS as a centralized nation with all power to say yes or no concentrated in Richmond, and giving Richmond the final word. That the states took their own steps to incorporate black men into their own military organizations is a proof that all power was not centralized, and that they took the Federal structure of the CS seriously. They did not ask the Congress for permission, they did what they thought they needed to do. These newspaper stories demonstrate that, given when they take place and who is taking the action.
 

E_just_E

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
Sep 3, 2014
Messages
6,097
Location
Center Valley, PA
The topic of this thread is "What the newspapers said from 1861-1865 regarding Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause"
It is not about your opinion on black Southerners and the Confederate Cause; plenty of other threads to discuss this.


Plenty of warnings and deletions already in this thread

Further attempts to derail it will result in thread bans.
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,825
Location
South Carolina
Harpers illustration January 10, 1863 labeled "NEGRO REBEL PICKETS AS SEEN THROUGH A FIELD GLASS" (sorry if this has been posted prior)

View attachment 217830

but of course then as now, a pop magazine blip proves nothing, i.e. "Man Blows Head Off With Trick Cigar"
Good post. I believe this drawing was based on sightings related in articles like the one below. There were a number of shorter accounts, but I appreciate the amount of detail included in this account, including the names of the two officers who saw the pickets and where they saw them. The behavior of the men may well indicate that black pickets were an unusual sight. A corporal reported the sighting to the lieutenant, who sent him back to confirm it, and then went himself with another lieutenant to see for themselves.

I checked on the details of this story in another thread, and they check out: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/the-myth-of-black-confederates.106634/page-76#post-1763859

Cleveland morning leader. (Cleveland [Ohio]) 1854-1865, March 16, 1863
8RQU1Al.jpg
 
Last edited:

19thGeorgia

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Messages
2,780
Update on previously posted item-

bostontrav6may65.jpg


Stoneman's Raid: Fight at Salisbury, NC, April 12, 1865 (this was the only place along the route where a large number of prisoners were taken)

From the report of Gen. A.C. Gillem-

"The fruits of this victory were 18 pieces of artillery with caisons, forges, and battery wagons complete, 17 stand of colors, and between 1,200 and 1,300 prisoners and the possession of the town...
...the command marched from Salisbury at 3 p.m. on the 13th, bringing away 11 of the 18 pieces captured artillery; the remaining seven pieces were destroyed and abandoned for lack of animals to bring them off. On the 15th the command reached Lenoir, and as it had been determined to send the captured artillery and prisoners to East Tennessee from this point, the 16th was occupied in returning the prisoners and refitting the artillery."

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series 1, Volume 49, part 1, p334
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,825
Location
South Carolina
Update on previously posted item-

View attachment 217954

Stoneman's Raid: Fight at Salisbury, NC, April 12, 1865 (this was the only place along the route where a large number of prisoners were taken)

From the report of Gen. A.C. Gillem-

"The fruits of this victory were 18 pieces of artillery with caisons, forges, and battery wagons complete, 17 stand of colors, and between 1,200 and 1,300 prisoners and the possession of the town...
...the command marched from Salisbury at 3 p.m. on the 13th, bringing away 11 of the 18 pieces captured artillery; the remaining seven pieces were destroyed and abandoned for lack of animals to bring them off. On the 15th the command reached Lenoir, and as it had been determined to send the captured artillery and prisoners to East Tennessee from this point, the 16th was occupied in returning the prisoners and refitting the artillery."

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series 1, Volume 49, part 1, p334
Good evidence that recruiting black CSA soldiers had some success outside of Richmond.
 



(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top