Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause: The Post-War Newspapers

Andersonh1

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The Dillon herald. (Dillon, S.C.) October 21, 1920
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Andersonh1

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William Mack Lee speaks before the Georgia House of Representatives, wearing a "coat of confederate gray". Lee was selling a book about the war at the time, and I'd be willing to guess that it was his connection to Robert E. Lee that helped get him access to the Georgia House.

I'm guessing this is the book referred to here: https://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/leewilliam/lee.html

The Kansas City sun. (Kansas City, Mo.) 1908-1924, August 21, 1920
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Andersonh1

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A letter to the editor from Captain M. M. Buford support pensions for black men, former slaves "whose faithful service" during the war should be appreciated and rewarded with a pension. It's fair to point out that he's speaking of service by these men, not fighting.

The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, December 10, 1920
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Andersonh1

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South Carolina discusses pensions for "the faithful negroes of the Confederate war" and both the State house and senate look favorably on the measure. And as we know, it will ultimately become law.

The Abbeville press and banner. (Abbeville, S.C.) 1869-1924, February 07, 1921
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Andersonh1

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The pension for former servants in SC progresses through the state senate.

The herald and news. (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, February 11, 1921
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Andersonh1

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As I noted before, I don't think it's true that James Jones hid the Great Seal, but regardless, the story circulated widely at the time of his death.

The Richmond palladium and sun-telegram. (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, April 09, 1921
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Andersonh1

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56 years after the war ended, Tennessee was talking about pensions for former servants in the Confederate army. How many were still alive at this point? "Every Negro who served in any way his master in the Confederate Army is to receive a pension...."

The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) June 18, 1921
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Cycom

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56 years after the war ended, Tennessee was talking about pensions for former servants in the Confederate army. How many were still alive at this point? "Every Negro who served in any way his master in the Confederate Army is to receive a pension...."

The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) June 18, 1921
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I imagine this only benefited the younger ones.
 

Andersonh1

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The headline and the body copy are inconsistent, 447 vs. 47. Either way, it goes to show how few were left alive at this point. Better late than never, and it no doubt gave some financial help to the few who were still alive, but more should have been done sooner.

"Negro Confederate Vets" in modern vernacular would be "Black Confederate Vets".

New Britain herald. [volume] (New Britain, Conn.) 1890-1976, July 27, 1921
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Andersonh1

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Further information on the Tennessee Confederate pensions for former servants.

Dresden enterprise and Sharon tribune. (Dresden, Tenn.) 1907-1997, July 29, 1921
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Andersonh1

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A letter to the editor describes a "colored Confederate veteran", the Reverend Daniel Brooks. He was a free man, and went with Capt. Bill Corbett's company in May of 1861. We're not told what his role in the company was, only that he "served with that company in 5th NC regiment" and later in the engineering department. He became a Methodist preacher after the war.

The Cleveland Star 2 Sep 1921
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Andersonh1

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Monroe Gooch passes away, and is named "Soldier of the Confederacy" by this newspaper. He is "A Gallant negro", a "comrade-servant" for the other vets, an "ex-Confederate soldier", "faithful servant" and "beloved comrade". We've seen this type of terminology a number of times in these post-war newspapers, where a man who is stated to have been a slave during the war is also called a soldier, so it's not as if they don't know what role he played and just made a mistake. They had no issue with a man being both.

The Tennessean April 19, 1909
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