Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause: The Post-War Newspapers

Andersonh1

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We are reminded in this post-war story that those two black convicts were refused enrollment into the Confederate service by Majors Pegram and Turner, responsible for recruitment and training. And I remember the reports that Kirby Smith had 25,000 black troops in the Trans-Mississippi, which just seems impossible so soon after the passage of the law. I have not been able to determine where that number came from.

Richmond times-dispatch. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, March 20, 1915
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Andersonh1

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We've seen this story before from other sources, where R. M. Doswell witnessed the black Confederate soldiers repel one charge by the Union cavalry, then surrendered on the second charge. This may well be the original source, a letter to the editor of the Richmond Times-Dispatch, possibly inspired by the recent reprinting of war news.

Richmond times-dispatch. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, April 25, 1915
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19thGeorgia

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We've seen this story before from other sources, where R. M. Doswell witnessed the black Confederate soldiers repel one charge by the Union cavalry, then surrendered on the second charge. This may well be the original source, a letter to the editor of the Richmond Times-Dispatch, possibly inspired by the recent reprinting of war news.

Richmond times-dispatch. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, April 25, 1915
View attachment 396166
There are some who like to discredit this story, but these documents confirm that Doswell was on General Barton's staff and he evacuated with the army group out of Richmond as stated in the article. He was captured a few days later at Sailors Creek-

Doswell, Richard M (20).jpg

Doswell, Richard M (20) (1).jpg
 
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Andersonh1

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That would support Doswell's story, if he was in the area he claimed to be in at the time.

One of the last few war news from 50 years ago stories claimed all the black soldiers dropped out of the ranks on the way to Amelia courthouse. That conflicts with Doswell's account, and I've always thought this story read as if it was written in a mocking tone, very dismissive of black soldiers for the Confederates.

Richmond times-dispatch. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, April 30, 1915
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Here's an example of this story as it appeared in multiple newspapers at the end of the war.

The Cleveland leader May 02, 1865
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Andersonh1

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There is some information about the "faithful slave" monument in Fort Mill here. S. E. White paid for the slave monument entirely out of his own pocket.

Fort Mill times. (Fort Mill, S.C.) 1892-current, July 29, 1915
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19thGeorgia

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That would support Doswell's story, if he was in the area he claimed to be in at the time.

One of the last few war news from 50 years ago stories claimed all the black soldiers dropped out of the ranks on the way to Amelia courthouse. That conflicts with Doswell's account, and I've always thought this story read as if it was written in a mocking tone, very dismissive of black soldiers for the Confederates.

Richmond times-dispatch. [volume] (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, April 30, 1915
View attachment 396249
The Richmond paper had new owners at the time (30 April 1865).
 

Andersonh1

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The writer here discusses S. E. White's monument to "the faithful slaves" and calls commemorating them "a patriotic deed."

Fort Mill times. (Fort Mill, S.C.) 1892-current, August 19, 1915
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Andersonh1

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A Confederate Veterans reunion in South Carolina included a former servant, Wash Barksdale, named as "our colored survivor", who always attended reunions.

The herald and news. [volume] (Newberry S.C.) 1903-1937, May 02, 1916
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Andersonh1

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This is a report of an audit of a single Mississippi county in 1916, and there are still seven former servants still receiving Confederate pensions, 51 years after the war ended.

The Hattiesburg news. (Hattiesburg, Miss.) 1908-1917, September 29, 1916
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Andersonh1

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Josh Robinson had his Southern Cross of Honor questioned five years earlier, but was unanmously voted to keep it as detailed here: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/bl...st-war-newspapers.165002/page-15#post-2373555

He was not the only black man to receive the Southern Cross of Honor (Preston Roberts was another, https://civilwartalk.com/threads/bl...st-war-newspapers.165002/page-11#post-2297394 ), nor was he the only black man to draw a Confederate pension, as we've seen, but many of these men have been described as the "only" example. Evidence perhaps of both the rarity of black Confederate veterans at this point and journalists who can't be bothered to do some background research.

Alexandria gazette. (Alexandria, D.C.) 1834-1974, March 21, 1917
4BPwRu8.jpg
 

19thGeorgia

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Josh Robinson had his Southern Cross of Honor questioned five years earlier, but was unanmously voted to keep it as detailed here: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/bl...st-war-newspapers.165002/page-15#post-2373555

He was not the only black man to receive the Southern Cross of Honor (Preston Roberts was another, https://civilwartalk.com/threads/bl...st-war-newspapers.165002/page-11#post-2297394 ), nor was he the only black man to draw a Confederate pension, as we've seen, but many of these men have been described as the "only" example. Evidence perhaps of both the rarity of black Confederate veterans at this point and journalists who can't be bothered to do some background research.

Alexandria gazette. (Alexandria, D.C.) 1834-1974, March 21, 1917
That's at least three we know of-
Caleb Glover
Josh Robinson
Preston Roberts
 

Andersonh1

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Back to 1917, where Josh Robinson got a much longer and more detailed account of his wartime experiences. Again, note how he's the "only" black man to which several things apply according to this paper, even though we've seen other black pensioners and a few other black men with the Southern Cross. In his own words he "shouldered a musket", was wounded, took charge of the horses and was often under fire while doing so, and had to fight off a Union soldier trying to take them.

Hopkinsville Kentuckian. (Hopkinsville, Ky.) 1889-1918, March 22, 1917
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