Black History/Black Resistance

ForeverFree

Major
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Location
District of Columbia
That was a very powerful speech by Rev Turner. It touches my heart and reminds me of the tie that binds black and white southerners together, our shared faith even if our better angels do not always prevail.
I am surprised that you say this "reminds me of the tie that binds black and white southerners together, our shared faith even if our better angels do not always prevail." Turner's comments were written out of anger and frustration with pernicious racial prejudice... it shook his faith. And clearly white legislators expressed no sentimental ties to their expelled/former colleagues. Eventually, the black legislators were given their seats back, after the federal government intervened... the better angels had no influence at all on white legislators.

Turner became an advocate for emigration to Africa, although he did not settle there himself:

Turner believed that Emancipation was the first Exodus for African-Americans and leaving the South would be the second. While many in the black community shared Turner's views on the limits of freedom in the South, most chose to remain in the United States instead of migrating to Africa. Turner's insistence on linking missionary work in Africa with mass emigration to the continent made him a divisive figure in the AME (African Methodist Episcopalian) Church. At the same time, his four trips to Africa showed him the dignity of a people uncowed by slavery.​

Turner died in Windsor, Ontario.

- Alan
 
Last edited:

atlantis

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 12, 2016
I am surprised that you say this "reminds me of the tie that binds black and white southerners together, our shared faith even if our better angels do not always prevail." Turner's comments were written out of anger and frustration with pernicious racial prejudice... it shook his faith. And clearly white legislators expressed no sentimental ties to their expelled/former colleagues. Eventually, the black legislators were given their seats back, after the federal government intervened... the better angels had no influence at all on white legislators.

Turner became an advocate for emigration to Africa, although he did not settle there himself:

Turner believed that Emancipation was the first Exodus for African-Americans and leaving the South would be the second. While many in the black community shared Turner's views on the limits of freedom in the South, most chose to remain in the United States instead of migrating to Africa. Turner's insistence on linking missionary work in Africa with mass emigration to the continent made him a divisive figure in the AME (African Methodist Episcopalian) Church. At the same time, his four trips to Africa showed him the dignity of a people uncowed by slavery.​

Turner died in Windsor, Ontario.

- Alan
It shook and tested his faith but it did not destroy it. There has been much, way too much in southern history to shake the faith of southerners yet a remnant across racial lines still hold dear a belief in the golden rule at the core of Christian teaching.
 

ForeverFree

Major
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Location
District of Columbia
It shook and tested his faith but it did not destroy it. There has been much, way too much in southern history to shake the faith of southerners yet a remnant across racial lines still hold dear a belief in the golden rule at the core of Christian teaching.
Turner never lost his faith in God, but he did lose faith in white Americans. He believed that whites ~ both North and South ~ would never treat African Americans with dignity and respect. Hence, his support for emigration to Africa.

This is getting way beyond the topic at hand. But it has been noted that slavery and Jim Crow were propagated by people who identified as Christian... their Christian belief did not translate into a practice of human equality. Indeed, throughout American history Christian belief has been explicitly used to justify discrimination and hierarchy based on ancestry and appearance. Of course, this is not to deny that there have always been white Christian southerners who have embraced human equality by reason of faith, but they were not in the majority.
----

This is from the Texas secession declaration:
DECLARATION OF CAUSES: February 2, 1861; A declaration of the causes which impel the State of Texas to secede from the Federal Union:​

...We hold as undeniable truths that the governments of the various States, and of the confederacy [i.e., the USA] itself, were established exclusively by the white race, for themselves and their posterity; that the African race had no agency in their establishment; that they were rightfully held and regarded as an inferior and dependent race, and in that condition only could their existence in this country be rendered beneficial or tolerable.​
That in this free government all white men are and of right ought to be entitled to equal civil and political rights; that the servitude of the African race, as existing in these States, is mutually beneficial to both bond and free, and is abundantly authorized and justified by the experience of mankind, and the revealed will of the Almighty Creator, as recognized by all Christian nations; while the destruction of the existing relations between the two races, as advocated by our sectional enemies, would bring inevitable calamities upon both and desolation upon the fifteen slave-holding States.​
By the secession of six of the slave-holding States, and the certainty that others will speedily do likewise, Texas has no alternative but to remain in an isolated connection with the North, or unite her destinies with the South.​

- Alan
 
Last edited:
Top