Research Black Confederates, how many ?

DanSBHawk

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Location
Wisconsin
We can't know their thoughts unless they left some record.
I don't believe the SCV has ever placed a marker on a grave without permission from the descendants.
And sometimes the descendants are sold a bill of goods. And sometimes there are descendants who disagree with the SCV, and remove the confederate markers on their own. Silas Chandler being one example.
 

Viper21

Brigadier General
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Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
And sometimes the descendants are sold a bill of goods. And sometimes there are descendants who disagree with the SCV, and remove the confederate markers on their own. Silas Chandler being one example.
The example of Silas Chandler's descendants is a unique case. They wouldn't be the first family members to have disagreements.

I would be willing to bet, the descendants who removed Silas' marker, had some prodding from outside sources as well....
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
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Location
Wisconsin
The example of Silas Chandler's descendants is a unique case. They wouldn't be the first family members to have disagreements.

I would be willing to bet, the descendants who removed Silas' marker, had some prodding from outside sources as well....
From what I remember, parts of the family had never bought into Silas being a black confederate. They didn't need much prodding.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
this is what Wikipedia tell us:
The Native Guards regiment was affected by this law. It was forced to disband on February 15, 1862, when the new law took effect...

The La native guard was disbanded when the state implemented the csa militia law.

Notice in New Orleans newspaper, February 20, 1862:

"Meschacebe Native Guard.
La compagnie reprendra ses exercises d'ecole de battallion lundi prochain....par ordre du capitaine"

Translation: The company will resume its battalion school exercises next Monday....

(Sorry for the poor quality of the scan)

meschacebe.jpg
 
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DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
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Location
Wisconsin
They said nothing at the time. It was about 20 years later when someone objected.
You know this for a fact? My understanding is that out of Silas' six great-grandchildren, only two attended the 1994 ceremony. The rest of the great-grandchildren refused to attend and knew it was BS that Silas served the confederacy willingly.
 

thomas aagaard

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Location
Denmark
Notice in New Orleans newspaper, February 20, 1862:

"Meschacebe Native Guard.
La compagnie reprendra ses exercises d'ecole de battallion lundi prochain....par ordre du capitaine"

Translation: The company will resume its battalion school exercises next Monday....

(Sorry for the poor quality of the scan)

View attachment 389605
Thanks for the scan.

The obvious question is how they where disbanded.
The new State law clearly made their militia unlawful. So the authorities had to do something... to at least look like they disbanded it.
But the arms and uniforms where owned by the men...
And local authorities do appear to have been willing to let them serve if the situation required it.

So it make a lot of sense that they officially disbanded... but still gathered to do drill. (maybe without arms. since they are not really needed to learn the basic of battalion drill) And no one stopped them from doing so.

This is still a very good example of how the question of race was way more complicated in the former frence and Spanish areas then in Congress in Richmond.


And the fact that the newspaper its not in English also add to this point.
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Thanks for the scan.

The obvious question is how they where disbanded.
The new State law clearly made their militia unlawful. So the authorities had to do something... to at least look like they disbanded it.
But the arms and uniforms where owned by the men...
And local authorities do appear to have been willing to let them serve if the situation required it.

So it make a lot of sense that they officially disbanded... but still gathered to do drill. (maybe without arms. since they are not really needed to learn the basic of battalion drill) And no one stopped them from doing so.

This is still a very good example of how the question of race was way more complicated in the former frence and Spanish areas then in Congress in Richmond.


And the fact that the newspaper its not in English also add to this point.
The wiki article says they were disbanded again, for good, a couple months later.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Thanks for the scan.

The obvious question is how they where disbanded.
The new State law clearly made their militia unlawful. So the authorities had to do something... to at least look like they disbanded it.
But the arms and uniforms where owned by the men...
And local authorities do appear to have been willing to let them serve if the situation required it.

So it make a lot of sense that they officially disbanded... but still gathered to do drill. (maybe without arms. since they are not really needed to learn the basic of battalion drill) And no one stopped them from doing so.

This is still a very good example of how the question of race was way more complicated in the former frence and Spanish areas then in Congress in Richmond.


And the fact that the newspaper its not in English also add to this point.
Technically you might say they "disbanded" but only to begin an immediate re-organization.

Elected or Appointed February 15, 1862
Accepted February 26 "
Commission Issued March 13 "
To rank from May 29, 1861

1612218857545.png
 
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C.W. Roden

Formerly: SouthernFriedOtaku
Joined
Dec 3, 2019
Location
South Carolina, USA, Earth
And sometimes the descendants are sold a bill of goods. And sometimes there are descendants who disagree with the SCV, and remove the confederate markers on their own. Silas Chandler being one example.
The fact that there are Confederate descendants who despise their ancestry for whatever reasons is no shock at this point. Why should this one be any more significant than the thousands of others who disgracefully reject a piece of their identities.
 

C.W. Roden

Formerly: SouthernFriedOtaku
Joined
Dec 3, 2019
Location
South Carolina, USA, Earth
I think it's reasonable to assume that more people have come across Levins writing or quotes.
And promptly forgot all about them as they moved on to some celebrity scandal after scrolling away.
I doubt many people outside of the Civil War community even know his name -- for that matter I don't think half the people in it even know who he is. He's no McPherson or Foote even if he like to crow that he is.
 

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
South Carolina
Notice in New Orleans newspaper, February 20, 1862:

"Meschacebe Native Guard.
La compagnie reprendra ses exercises d'ecole de battallion lundi prochain....par ordre du capitaine"

Translation: The company will resume its battalion school exercises next Monday....

(Sorry for the poor quality of the scan)

View attachment 389605

Do you have the newspaper name and date for this? I'd like to add it to my collection or articles.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
And promptly forgot all about them as they moved on to some celebrity scandal after scrolling away.
I doubt many people outside of the Civil War community even know his name -- for that matter I don't think half the people in it even know who he is. He's no McPherson or Foote even if he like to crow that he is.
Levin's schtick is basically politics with a history facade.
 
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