Black Armed irregular resistance to theConfederacy

Caracofe71

Cadet
Joined
Aug 10, 2017
Should the Union Army have supported the practice by sending weapons and supplies to the irregulars?
I think looking back at the limited effect it had for the British during the 1st Revolution the Union think tank probably thought their time and resources were better spent on other endeavours... In some respects I wish they had, I'd be interested to see the comparison of how it worked for them compared to the British.
 

Canadian

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 24, 2017
Fascinating thread. So much great research.

I can understand why some of the maroons " would rather be shot than took." It would have come as a surprise to some of the "reluctant liberators " that these commmunities existed. It as news to me until very recently. We tend to get a picture of slavery that has the enslaved people being passive until liberated by Whites.
 

Rebforever

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Oct 26, 2012
Williams exaggerates the effect of the "resistance" much like Stephanie McCurry with her book Confederate Reckoning. Most of these marauders ("resistance") cared for no one but themselves. They mainly made war on the civilian population (the easier target) and had no effect on the outcome of the war.
Also note that the Union Army stated away from them.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Some of the black armed irregulars in the Southern states should be considered brave people fighting for their freedom and the freedom of their families. Some should be considered people loyal to the Union. Some should be considered little more than criminals taking anything they could from civilians. I am not sure it would be fair to call them traitors against their state. It does that some courage to take up arms against the Confederate government, so I guess I could call them brave on a certain level. this may greatly depend on the forum member's view of the Civil War in general.

The next question is how effective they were. This is open to debate. They very fact they were no longer working for their masters impacted the Confederate war effort. Armed black irregulars can not be used to either support the Confederate economy or to support the Confederate Army. They did tie up some Confederate forces, but not too many front line troops. Exactly how much these armed irregulars influenced the outcome of the war is difficult to know.
 

Dedej

Retired User
Joined
Mar 17, 2017
Some of the black armed irregulars in the Southern states should be considered brave people fighting for their freedom and the freedom of their families. Some should be considered people loyal to the Union. Some should be considered little more than criminals taking anything they could from civilians. I am not sure it would be fair to call them traitors against their state. It does that some courage to take up arms against the Confederate government, so I guess I could call them brave on a certain level. this may greatly depend on the forum member's view of the Civil War in general.

The next question is how effective they were. This is open to debate. They very fact they were no longer working for their masters impacted the Confederate war effort. Armed black irregulars can not be used to either support the Confederate economy or to support the Confederate Army. They did tie up some Confederate forces, but not too many front line troops. Exactly how much these armed irregulars influenced the outcome of the war is difficult to know.

To the Maroons - I would imagine they really didn't care what people thought of them. Or if they were honorable, criminals, traitors in anyone's eyes - especially not those who wish to keep them enslaved. They were once enslaved people who did whatever they could do to not be.

Maroons were fugitive slaves aka runaway slaves - so some were disconnected from what was going on - as some rarely left their areas and were not connected to society.

They were only concerned about themselves and their loved ones. They did whatever they could do to protect their areas and their families from whites in general. It wasn't about Confederates, Union, fighting or gaining freedom for all. It was about survival while being free from being someone's property.

Some Maroons knew of the war and joined the Union Army and some supported the army in terms of fighting the Confederate soldiers off if they [Confederates] came into their areas --- but they were not officially apart of the Union - nor did they want to be. It was always about protection of self and family -- and to not be enslaved.

And remember these communities were ongoing since the beginning of slavery in America - they were constantly being found but being built back up. But, because they are called runaway slaves or fugitive slaves - they weren't really respected via in history as communities of resistance or "maroons."

Marronage was a consistent resistance to slavery. Many of the enslaved continued to flee their plantations and enslavers to feel what freedom felt like. Some were caught and killed and some were caught and continued to run away again and again - until they got it right - and remained free.
 
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leftyhunter

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
May 27, 2011
Location
los angeles ca
What the same hill is THAT!
My good friend many times in the past you have asserted as have certain others that black slaves were delighted to be slaves and were loyal to their masters. Here myself and other posters especially @Dedej have posted evidence that that assertion ain't necessarily so. You love sources and we got but good.
Enjoy!
Leftyhunter
 

Rebforever

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Oct 26, 2012
My good friend many times in the past you have asserted as have certain others that black slaves were delighted to be slaves and were loyal to their masters. Here myself and other posters especially @Dedej have posted evidence that that assertion ain't necessarily so. You love sources and we got but good.
Enjoy!
Leftyhunter
Why oh why don't you read what I posted correctly? Read what I hilited in your post.
 

Rebforever

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Oct 26, 2012
I stand by what I wrote. If you say that blacks hated being slaves and fought against slave owners to the best of their ability or at least many did then I will retract my post.
Leftyhunter
*I didn't say no such thing. Please show me where I posted what you say I posted.
 
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