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Best Civil War Sniper Rifle

Discussion in 'Civil War Weapons and Ammunition' started by OldBrainsHalleck, Mar 10, 2017.

  1. Jobe Holiday

    Jobe Holiday First Sergeant

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    Zburkett - Can you reference the "sabot Whitworth"? I am curious as to what it is.
    J.
     

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  3. zburkett

    zburkett Corporal

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    I have a little bit of a time crunch (bad weather, new calves) but it is my understanding that with the round bullet a sabot rather than a conventional patch was used to induce spin. It was probably in Edwards' "Guns of the Civil War." I know I ran across it on the internet looking up the Whitworth.
     
  4. Jobe Holiday

    Jobe Holiday First Sergeant

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    The Cylindrical Projectile had a narrow hollow base which extended into the bullet for about 3/8th of an inch. This assisted in sealing the gases behind the bullet immediately upon firing and upsetting the base of the bullet into the hexagonal bore quickly. The heavy powder charge then completed the obturation of the cylindrical bullet into the flats of the bore. There was no sabot. The rear sight is graduated differently on both sides of the ladder due to the ballistics of each projectile being different from one another. One side is marked "H" for the hexagonal mechanically fitted bullet, and the other leg is marked "C" for the cylindrical smooth sided bullet.

    However, there was a Whitworth projectile with a sabot, and I'll bet that is the one you have confused with the Civil War era muzzle loading Whitworth. The Whitworth projectile for the British Breech Loading "Monkey Tail Rifles and Carbines" used a Whitworth bullet with a felt lubricating wad attached to the back of the bullet! That is most likely what you had seen.
    J.
     
  5. ResearchPress

    ResearchPress Private

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    There may be some confusion with the Whitworth short cartridge. The hexagonal bullet and its wads are encased in a card tube. The tube was held in the muzzle countersink to align the bullet and the bullet and wads then pushed down through the tube by the rammer. The tube is not however a sabot.

    The Westley Richards 'Monkey Tail' had octagonal rifling, not hexagonal as Whitworth. Insofar as I know it used a cylindrical bullet.

    David
     
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  6. Jobe Holiday

    Jobe Holiday First Sergeant

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    If David says that is the way it is....then that's the way it is and I shall cheerfully stand corrected! (Now I have to go back and figure out where I came up with what I had!)
    J.
     
  7. ResearchPress

    ResearchPress Private

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    The barrels of Westley Richards 'Monkey Tail' rifles were stamped 'Whitworth Patent', which may have been a source for confusion. Westley Richards manufactured the early Whitworths, duirng the original trials.

    David
     
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  8. Jobe Holiday

    Jobe Holiday First Sergeant

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    Thank you, I'm sure that had a hand in my confusion!
    J.
     
  9. thomas aagaard

    thomas aagaard Sergeant Major

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    When shooting up or down using Pythagoras is the easy way to judge how much "shorter" you need to aim.

    When on a 400m "hill". Shooting down into a valley.
    The direct range is 700m, then the angle is 35degrees.
    Then you need the sights set at 574m

    If you are firing down at 45 degree (and I think some fights during the war had that) then you need the sights set at 70% of the direct range.
    With the low velocity of rifled muskets, this can make you hit pretty high even at rather close range.

    http://www.rifleshootermag.com/network-topics/tips-tactics-network/hitting-a-high-or-low-angle-shot/
     

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