Discussion Battle at Panther Creek, Kentucky.

Taylin

Corporal
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Location
Rolling hills of southern Indiana
Has a rule milita men were not entitled to pensions although apparently the Indiana Legion had some political pull and got theirs.
Leftyhunter
Only those who were wounded it seems, or the family of those killed. I haven't found examples yet of any who served unharmed (aside from those Federalist i.e during Morgan's raid and etc)
Minor's pension for Isaac Varner as an example:
32959_033153-00413.jpg
 

leftyhunter

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
May 27, 2011
Location
los angeles ca
Only those who were wounded it seems, or the family of those killed. I haven't found examples yet of any who served unharmed (aside from those Federalist i.e during Morgan's raid and etc)
Minor's pension for Isaac Varner as an example: View attachment 196504
True. Even federal and state pensions ( which was a seperately administered pension) given to ex Confederate soldiers had to show that the applicant suffered some sort of harm due to the war. Some states granted pensions to men who were poverty stricken years after the war. The federal and possibly the state goverments had housing for homeless Civil War veterans.
Is Varners pension from the federal government or the State of Indiana?
Leftyhunter
 

leftyhunter

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
May 27, 2011
Location
los angeles ca
It looks like every other pension I've seen on Ancestry, I'm guessing Federal. I don't know if Indiana provided pensions out of it's own budget.
Some states such has Kentucky and Missouri did . I seem to recall Missouri gave pensions to both. If memory serves all the former Confederate states had pensions for Confederate vets but federal pensions were more.
Leftyhunter
 

Derrick

Cadet
Joined
Jul 29, 2018
Location
Kentucky
Hi Taylin!
I just stumbled across this thread by chance after someone suggested I look at the threads on Belgian rifles. I am finishing up a book on this very battle! I'm an Owensboro native and have always been frustrated with the lack of quality sources on the events here and decided to get it done on my own. I've pretty much come to the conclusion, after researching this like crazy, that Netter's simple refusal of surrender threw a wrench into the 10th Kentucky Partisan Rangers' late summer and fall Campaign. Everything had gone perfectly for them since the Newburgh Raid, and this was the first time they were dealt a severe blow.

The 4th Indiana Legion from Spencer County has been an interesting subject to research. On Friday I went to the state archives in Indianapolis and went through hundreds of original documents, all pertaining to the Spencer County Legion. It was a blast!

I am glad that someone else has put some thought into the battle! I was beginning to think that no one around here even knew that it had occurred!
 

Taylin

Corporal
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Location
Rolling hills of southern Indiana
The 4th Indiana Legion from Spencer County has been an interesting subject to research. On Friday I went to the state archives in Indianapolis and went through hundreds of original documents, all pertaining to the Spencer County Legion. It was a blast!
I would be very interested to know about their uniforms, I know that Legion companies could design their own uniform and there are some intriguing ones. I've put a good chunk of time researching this little engagement more or less by happenstance - I'm interested in the Legion and their role in the war overall. It's good to see that you are working on a book on this, you'll have to let me know when you're finished, I would love to read it. I too had been dissatisfied with the lack of easily accessible source/information on this skirmish and that basically translated into this thread.

I'm an Orange County Indiana native, was thinking about making a trip down to the historical marker sometime
 

Derrick

Cadet
Joined
Jul 29, 2018
Location
Kentucky
So far what I have found is that all of the companies were not uniformed. From their 1864 reports of each company, they all report that they are not in uniform. That doesn't necessarily mean that in 1862 they did not have uniforms, but I feel that it was probably the case though. There was an independent company, from Vincennes I believe, that uniformed and armed themselves and were pretty dashing looking according to the Evansville Daily Journal. The historical marker isn't much, and only tells part of the overall story. But Sutherland's Hill is still in pretty good shape, even with there being a few houses built on the northern side of the hill. The fighting on the 19th that killed Netter is on the current OZ Distillery property on the Ohio River.

A good book to read on the Legion is "The Indiana Legion: A Civil War Militia" by John P. Etter is a good read for anyone looking to learn more about the Legion. It isn't written in chronological order, but gives you a good overall impression of the different aspects of the Legion. He even puts in one of Col. Crooks' reports and mentions the battle at Panther Creek.
 

Taylin

Corporal
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Location
Rolling hills of southern Indiana
I'll have to stop by the distillery then if I head down that way. I want to go more or less just to be there and get a nice feel for the place. I have that book actually, it's a nice read. I had read maybe somewhere in the many postings here that the Spencer Legion wasn't uniformed but I'll take another look at it sometime.
 

heidir999

Cadet
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Another report by Col. Crooks. He list the dead and wounded, which all seems to be accurate. "Curtis Lamar" is James C Lamar, Isaac Varner is accurate, but Simpson Palmer I cannot account for. In this report he says that his forces number 365 during the engagement and that the enemy had not less than 500. The original union force was 420ish but with the forward cavalry being routed with only few exceptions, the remaining force during the balance of the battle was 365. Anyways, below is the report from pages 292-293: "Indiana in the War of the Rebellion: Official Report of W. H. H. Terrel"

Sir:-- I have the honor to report that on Friday, the 19th inst., our gallant young townsman, Hugh Hales, a member of Colonel Netter's command, swam across the Ohio River below Owensboro, bearing the intelligence that their camp had been attacked on that morning, their Colonel (Netter) killed, and that the rebels had possession of Owensboro; and that the camp would be compelled to surrender unless speedily reinforced. I immediately dispatched the same messenger urging them to hold out a few hours, that we would be on hand, and requested them to take possession and hold some available point on the River where they could protect a crossing for us, and to indicate that point to me either by messenger or signal, which was promptly done.
The news of their disaster spread as if by magic, the entire border of our country was in a few hours aroused and on their way to the scene of action. In less than eight hours from the first intelligence, I had four hundred and fifty of our Spencer boys in the camp at Owensboro--others kept arriving during the night, until my command was increased to five hundred and fifty men. Much confusion prevailed in camp consequent upon the dead of the gallant Netter.
Most of the rebels fled at our approach. Learning, however, that there were a few squads scattered over the city arresting and paroling Union men, I detached one hundred of my men under Major Towne, for the purpose of suppressing such conduct, which was promptly done.
Such other disposition of my men as in the opinion of the commanding officers exigencies of the case seemed to require.
About this time, eight o'clock. P.M., Lieutenant Colonel Wood, of the First Indiana Cavalry, arrived on the ground and very properly assumed command, infusing confidence and restoring order.
Shortly after, reliable evidence reach our quarters that the rebels were in camp eight miles out on Livermore Road, and an attack was determined on. Accordingly a command was organized under the supervision of Colonel Wood, which left Owensboro at two o'clock next morning. This command consisted of one 6-pound gun, sixty of Netter's mounted men, and three hundred and fifty of my infantry. Major Towne was assigned to the cavalry, the gun to Sergeant J. C. Finch, of the Indiana Legion, I assumed command of my infantry, Colonel Wood commanding the whole.
We arrived in front of their encampment between daylight and sunrise. Whether by accident or imprudent design, the cavalry became engaged with the entire force of the enemy, before either our gun or infantry were in supporting distance. Two blast's from the enemy's cannon and a round of small arms put them to confused flight, no more to be heard from till long after the battle was over.
Nine of the cavalry were captured and paroled by the enemy, two or three wounded. among whom was William J. Hale, of our place, now a member of Netter's command ; he was paroled and arrived in camp the same evening. On hearing the engagement opened by our cavalry we advanced rapidly till in range of our gun, which was immediately brought to bear on the enemy charged with canister. At the third round it was disabled and taken to the rear. No alternative was now left but to close in with out infantry, which was done in beautiful style. Our men moved up with the steady tramp of veterans, under the booming of the enemy's cannon and volley's of musketry, to a point indicated, and returned fire with the deadly aim that only back-woodsmen know so well how to do.
The position attained by this rapid movement was an excellent one. We were screened by a fence with the advantage of a ditch made by throwing up a road not less than two feet deep, and doubtless accounts for our comparatively small loss. This position we held, pouring volley after volley of well-aimed musketry, until their lines began to waver and give way, when Colonel Wood, with a portion of the command, gallantly charged the heights they occupied, driving them in complete and perfect confusion. Thus terminated the battle of Panther Creek.
No troops could have done better. They bravely withstood the fire of the enemy for nearly one hour and a half without the least wavering, steadily pressing forward, driving the enemy inch by inch, until he was completely scattered in dismay. The enemy played upon us with a small cannon all the while, with sacks of minnie balls, but evidently over-shot very much, a mistake probably caused by their own altitude.
I cannot risk mentioning the names in detail for fear of doing injustice to some. It is sufficient to say that all did well. Knowing the material of which the Legion is composed, I thought well of it, but now my confidence is boundless.
I have taken some pains to ascertain the number of the enemy, and conviction is that he had no less than five hundred men, nor not materially over. Our command engaged did not exceed three hundred and sixty-five men including three or four of the cavalry that finally fell in with us together with three or four citizens of Owensboro.
I bear willing testimony to the gallant conduct of Lieutenant Colonel William F. Wood, of the First Indiana Cavalry. He is a brace and accomplished officer. Nor can I refrain from speaking in terms of commendation of Lieutenant L. C. Parker, of the Legion, who was at all times where duty called, calm and collected.
To Dr. J. S. Hougland, I hereby return my hearty thanks ; he was on hand in the fight and kindly volunteered his professional services in taking care of the wounded.
The loss of the enemy, was killed and counted on the field thirty-six, wounded and found upon the field some fifteen, besides the enemy took away two wagon loads of their wounded during the engagement. The entire loss of the enemy in killed and wounded is acknowledged by them to be between seventy-five and eighty, and we took sixteen prisoners, besides a large number of guns, pistols, sabers, saddles, blankets and horses. Our loss, three killed and thirty-five wounded as follows :
Killed--Simpson Palmer, Isaac Varner, Curtis Lamar.
Wounded--James Naney, right arm badly ; Peter McCradie, three places badly ; Joel Shrusbery, neck badly ; J. W. Ferguson, thigh slightly ; B. M. Miller, ankle slightly ; Simon Barns, slightly ; J. A. Ferguson, leg badly ; W. Y. Kencaid, leg slightly ; J. M. Anderson, thigh badly ; John Stevens, thigh slightly ; Frank Woods, thigh slightly ; Charles Ray, in cheek slightly ; John Scamahorn, shoulder badly ; W. A. Karney, in neck severely ; George Medcalf, leg badly ; B. F. Brady, slightly ; Samuel Tenant, slightly ; W. Huff, shoulder slightly ; William Haines, in foot slightly ; Dan bellville, chest slightly ; Samuel Jones, breast slightly ; John Cahoon, thigh severely ; Jerry Sidwell, leg badly ; Sebron Jones, shoulder slightly ; Dave Bingle, nose slightly ; Stephen Parker, hand badly ; Levi Haines, hip and heel ; Lewis Meeks, leg slightly ; S. R. Rice, in shoulder slightly ; A. J. Whitehouse, shoulder ; J. M. Howland, in thigh ; O. R. Brown, slightly ; Andrew Rasor, thigh slightly ; Cal Rasor, spent ball on head ; John Jones, in head, slightly.

Yours trully
J. W. Crooks,
Colonel Commanding Legion.
Thank you for posting this! My ancestor is Richard Barnes from Spencer County Indiana. He went by R.S. Barnes and I have some evidence that his middle same was Simon. His second wife was Mary Ann Boyer and she applied for benefits. Do you think there is a possibility that the Simon Barns under the list of wounded could be my Richard Barnes. Do you know how I could find out?

Richard Barnes.JPG


Richard Barnes Civil War.jpg
 

mofederal

Major
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Jun 27, 2017
Location
Southeast Missouri
Militia members in Missouri did get Federal pensions after the war, and the state might have also given them some money. it makes sense seeing how they fought for the state during the war. Those injured while in the service of the state militia could apply for a pension in beginning in 1874, this included those who served in the Missouri State Guard, Home Guard, Missouri Militia, US Reserve Corps, EMM, Missouri State Militia, Provisional Enrolled Militia, Citizen Guards and the Missouri Militia of 1865, could apply for a state veterans pension. Others who served in the Missouri Militia during the war could apply for a pension around 1890, there were also extensions to the act in 1907 and 08. They eventually got a federal pension.
 

Taylin

Corporal
Joined
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Location
Rolling hills of southern Indiana
Thank you for posting this! My ancestor is Richard Barnes from Spencer County Indiana. He went by R.S. Barnes and I have some evidence that his middle same was Simon. His second wife was Mary Ann Boyer and she applied for benefits. Do you think there is a possibility that the Simon Barns under the list of wounded could be my Richard Barnes. Do you know how I could find out?

View attachment 216060

View attachment 216064
I've only found pensions for legion men that were wounded. I'd say you have a good shot, you can order his pension records from the national archives and you may find a statement or testimony identifying why he's applying. That will probably be your best shot. Give me his death date and location and I'll try to find something
 
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heidir999

Cadet
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Thank you for the information. He lived in Spencer County, Indiana, but I have not been able to find his date of death or where he is buried. All his children were born and died in Spencer and Warrick Counties in Indiana. His second wife, Mary Ann Boyer, filed for his pension in Sept 1890, so I am assuming he passed away before that date. Simon Barns is listed as slightly wounded in one of your documents. He went by Richard Barnes, R. S. Barnes and Simon Barnes. I have documents from his children using all 3 variations, but the most common was R. S. Barnes. Thank you so much for your help!
Heidi
 

Taylin

Corporal
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Location
Rolling hills of southern Indiana
Thank you for the information. He lived in Spencer County, Indiana, but I have not been able to find his date of death or where he is buried. All his children were born and died in Spencer and Warrick Counties in Indiana. His second wife, Mary Ann Boyer, filed for his pension in Sept 1890, so I am assuming he passed away before that date. Simon Barns is listed as slightly wounded in one of your documents. He went by Richard Barnes, R. S. Barnes and Simon Barnes. I have documents from his children using all 3 variations, but the most common was R. S. Barnes. Thank you so much for your help!
Heidi
Haven't found anything. Though I can't seem to find a Simon Barnes or Barns in Spencer County in 1860-63 so I'd say there's a good chance that it may well be Richard who was wounded. Seeing as how he has a pension file and his wife got a widow's pension. Again the best bet I feel is to order his pension files, I've done this for a guy I'm curious about I'm hoping that it will shed light on a mystery for me. You can order records here - https://eservices.archives.gov/ but it will take up to 4 months to recieve them.

This is my first time ordering pension records so I can't testify as to the contents but I'm in high hopes that there will be written testimony about why the individual deserves a pension which would include for you his possible injury inn the battle or in my case whether or not my guy deserted the Confederate army and joined the Union with his brothers in the closing months of the war
 

heidir999

Cadet
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Haven't found anything. Though I can't seem to find a Simon Barnes or Barns in Spencer County in 1860-63 so I'd say there's a good chance that it may well be Richard who was wounded. Seeing as how he has a pension file and his wife got a widow's pension. Again the best bet I feel is to order his pension files, I've done this for a guy I'm curious about I'm hoping that it will shed light on a mystery for me. You can order records here - https://eservices.archives.gov/ but it will take up to 4 months to recieve them.

This is my first time ordering pension records so I can't testify as to the contents but I'm in high hopes that there will be written testimony about why the individual deserves a pension which would include for you his possible injury inn the battle or in my case whether or not my guy deserted the Confederate army and joined the Union with his brothers in the closing months of the war
Thank you so much! I will order the records right away.
 

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