Discussion Battle at Panther Creek, Kentucky.

Taylin

Corporal
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Location
Rolling hills of southern Indiana
Historical Marker
PCB.jpgNow admittedly, this marker doesn't do a great deal of justice. A few google searches doesn't turn much up apart from the marker itself, fortunately though we have newspapers and reports from the Indiana Legion to read and enjoy, I will transcribe below the newspaper and reports, as well as other things I think are worth mentioning.

From "Union Army in the Civil War : Indiana Legion reports of brigade and regimental officers, 1st-4th brigades" There are plenty of spelling errors, I will do what I can to correct but some are difficult to understand.


"Headquarters Fourth Regiment,

Rockport, December 2, 1862.

Major-General Love, Commanding’ Indiana Legion ,

, Indianapolis , Indiana :

General: — In obedience to orders, I have the honor to report
the following as pertaining to my command:

Owing to the excitement between Evansville and Cannelton
during the past summer, the duties of my command were very
heavy. During the months of July, August, September, and until
the 6th of October, we had not less than a score of alarms. You
*’ill see by the accompanying papers, the state of excitement in
and about the town of Owensboro, Ky., how urgently they appealed
for assistance, and how much they relied upon the Fourth Regiment of the Legion for protection. I was called to their relief not less than six times, taking my entire command, with many citizens besides. In fact I can say that the Legion of Spencer literally defended the town of Owensboro, and the camp of troops under Colonel Netter, for the space of ninety days. lie told me but for our assistance in time of need, he would have to burn his stores and abandon the place. That the Indianians with their muskets and artillery were his only salvation. With my assurance that the entire fighting population of our county would fly to their relief, if needed, the loyal portion of Davies county, Ky., took a high Union stand, and have finally succeeded in establishing a tolerably, and only a tolerably, healthy sentiment. They had much to contend with, for I am quite certain it was not excelled in disloyalty by any county in the State of Kentucky.

Thus things went on until the morning of the 19th of September, 1862, when the town, of Owensboro was attacked and taken by the rebels, the Colonel in command killed, and his forces rendered useless for good. Upon receiving notice of this disaster, and a call for assistance, I immediately threw across the river,
below the city, under the protection of our ordinance and their camp, from five to six hundred of my command, driving the rebels from the place, and taking possession of the town.

Learning that night that the rebels were encamped about eight miles out, we organized a force for the purpose of giving them battle. Most of my men were much fatigued, many of them having marched over twenty miles, yet they set out with an alacrity and eagerness unexampled. W e arrived in front of the enemy between sunrise and daylight next morning. My command consisted of three hundred and fifty of the Spencer Legion, some five or eight citizens of Davies county, and sixty of better’s mounted men. The enemy’s forces consisted of a battalion of five hundred under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Martin of the rebel army. We had with us one 6-pounder cannon ; they had a 4-pounder piece.

They opened the battle by dispersing our cavalry, who had incautiously gone beyond supporting distance, and who were lost to your service t lie balance of the day. Hearing the engagement of the cavalry, we hastened forward, put our cannon in position, and at the third round dismounted it by bursting up the trunnion caps*(By my understanding, this means the side protrusions that hold a cannon in place on its mount), which resulted in sending it to the rear. We now saw no alternative but to close in with the infantry, which was done in a style that would have been commendable to veterans. The engagement lasted one hour and a half, the enemy playing upon us his small cannon, charged with sacks of small Minie balls, all the while. The deadly aim of our backwoodsmen, however, proved too hot ; observing their wavering lines, we made a charge, scattering them in the wildest confusion.

Our casualties were three killed and thirty-five wounded. The cavalry had two wounded and eight of the men taken prisoners, who were paroled the same evening. The enemy’s loss was thirty- six killed, between seventy and eighty wounded, and sixteen taken prisoners. We also captured twelve or fifteen horses, one hundred and thirty -five or forty small arms, and a great many blankets, sabers, etc..

It is needless to say that all did well; both officers and men seemed to vie with each other in deeds of daring. Thus terminated the battle of Panther creek.

Subsequent to this, you will ob-n v~* (Observe?), by accompanying papers, another very urgent request to return to Owensboro with my command. The rebels had threatened to return with reinforcements, and visit the place with retribution for their Panther creek discomfiture, which kept the public mind, and especially the troops at that point, in the wildest state of excitement.

On the morning of the 6th of October, I again had between four and five hundred men opposite Owensboro, on this side of the river. By this time my men began to complain; “the citizens would not defend themselves; more than half of the town were rebel sympathizers; they had lost their friends at Panther creek in defending a people who would not fight for themselves; their crops were suffering, tobacco in particular, the only thing they expected to realize a remunerative price for.” Although the last man would have crossed the river if I had said so, I was charitable enough to heed their murmurings. I put two pieces of artillery in position: sent Major Holman, who was then in command, a note declining to cross the river; that 1 proposed to defend his camp and town from this side of the river; “that he should give the citizens of Owensboro notice that just, as soon as the women and children could escape, after the attack was made upon him, or the town taken
possession of by the rebels, I should commence shelling it from this side, a thing I was amply prepared to perform.” His answer to this you will see in the closing paragraph of his note of the 6th of October. No attach was made , at that time , either upon the camp or city, nor have they had any trouble on the border of Davies county , Kentucky, since.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN W. CROOKS,

Colonel Fourth Regiment Indiana Legion."

Note: The Col Netter that was killed was named Gabriel Netter, haven't had time to look deep but looks like he was in the 15th KY, Union
News paper transcriptions will be in my followup post(s)
 
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Taylin

Corporal
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Location
Rolling hills of southern Indiana
Evansville Daily Journal, issue on September 24th, 1862. Page 2/4 on NewspaperArchive.

"Rockport, September 21, 1862.
Eds. Journal: I take great pleasure in giving you the particulars of a brilliant victory which we achieved over the rebels yesterday, (Saturday), eight miles from Owensboro. The report that reached here at 10 o'clock that Owensboro had been captured, Col. Netter killed, and that his forces were in danger of being captured by superior numbers. All kinds of business was immediately suspended, and the militia rallied. At 4 o'clock 400 had rendezvoused at Larkin's Ferry three miles below Owensboro, from which place they were conveyed by the John T. McCombs to Netter's camp. We were marched to Owensboro and occupied the Court House. At 11 o'clock Col. Wm F. Wood, of the First Indiana Cavalry, arrived and took command, and at 3 o'clock we left Owensboro to hunt the rebels who were encamped seven miles from that place. We took the Livermore road, and just before sun-rise cam up with them. They were apprised of our coming, having heard us cross a bridge over Panther Creek, one mile from their encampment. The road we were marching on was flanked on each side by a deep ditch and an almost impenetrable thicket of briers and underbrush. One company of Netter's cavalry had the advance and at the first fire they turned their horses and fled down the road, compelling us to plunge into the briers or be run down by their riderless and unmanageable horses. We were scattered in all directions on both sides of the road and in utter confusion. After the cavalry had passed to the rear, (where they took good care to stay during the entire action, except about six who abandoned their horses and fought bravely,) our brave and gallant officers called on us to rally in line on the left of the road, which we soon did. After resting ten minutes and finding that the enemy were not disposed to take advantage of the cavalry rout and attack us we filed into the road and advanced. It was a strange and exciting position for us, raw militia as we were, just from our stores and plows, their cannon booming in our front and the rattle of musketry as the advanced engaged each other. We advanced up the road on the "double-quick," and soon entered a lane with a field on the right in the shape of a V, the point of the V some four hundred yards in front of where we entered, touching the road. When we had reached about two-thirds of the way up the lane, the enemy opened fire on us, having complete command of the entire lane from the point of the V along the string of fence and brush to the broad end of the V. We jumped into the ditches on both sides of the road, and from there and from trees and fences returned the fire. Cols Wood and Crooks of this county soon commenced pushing us up the road on the left hand side, passing the point of the V, which compelled them to leave the fence and take to the trees. But we kept advancing slowly, and soon they fled towards their cannon, which was posted on a hill in a field about two hundred yards behind their first position. As they ran up the hill, our men followed and shot them down as they would hogs. They skedaddled all over the hill taking with them their cannon, which the cavalry could have captured if they had come up.
-They left 38 dead on the field and about 35 wounded. We captured about 50 shotguns, muskets and rifles; also twelve horses and mules, saddles, bridles, pistols, blankets etc. Col Wood alone charged into an old building, occupied by some of the enemy, ran his bayonet through one and captured seven. I do not know how many prisoners in all were taken, but I have heard from ten to twenty. James Wilson, the man who fought the rebels at Rumsey, was in the battle and killed six. He was armed with a Henry Rifle. He is a brave Kentuckian. I cannot say as much for the rest, as there were not more than twelve in the fight. The cavalry officers and men, with a few exceptions among the men, acted in the most cowardly and shameful manner. One of the cavalry Majors, after the battle was over, rode up to one of the companies that had carried a flag through the fight and asked to be allowed to carry it. On getting possession of it he rode on a mile in advance of the company, telling the ladies along the road that "There was the flag we didn't let go down," when the pusillanimous popinjay was not in the fight at all.
-Upon returning to town Col. Crooks, with some others, proceeded to Netter's camp. The Colonel was suffering severely from neuralgia in the eyes-in fact, nearly blind-and after resting, informed the officer in command, one Freeman, that he desired to be passed out, as he wished to get home early. After considerable swearing and bluster, he gave his consent that the Colonel might go. Colonel C. then told him that he had a friend who he wished to take along to attend him if he needed anything. His reply was: "By G-d, sir, if you talk that way you shall not go. I'll order you back." That made the Colonel mad. He told the puppy in emphatic language that he had 400 Indianians in town, and he would send for them and they would come down and take him and his whole d---d camp. Upon that information a decided change took place in his demeanor. You never saw a dirty coward more obsequious, He knew the Colonel's men would fight, but he did not see it, not him; and so fearful was he of arousing their anger, that he fawned like a whipped Spaniel; informed his friend where he could take the Colonel to, and went himself and passed them out.
-But I must bring this letter to a close, as the boys all agree in saying we had "lots of fun." We lost three killed and about thirty wounded. I append a partial list below. The rebels left a surgeon to take care of their wounded, and he informed Colonel Wood that their force numbered 800. The engagement lasted an hour and a half. I could write much more about our campaign but I have not time. Spencer county alone was represented in the fight, with the exception before mentioned, of about twelve or probably as many as twenty, but not more, Kentuckians. Nearly every man stood up to the work and did his duty. Colonel's Wood and Crooks, Lieut. Col. Parker of this county, and Lieut. Scammanhorn, Capt. Stuteville, Capt. Paul Jones, in fact all the officers, acted bravely and were constantly exposed to the enemy's fire.
-I had nearly forgotten to mention our treatment by the citizens of Owensboro. We had one bucket to furnish water to three or four companies, and carry the water ourselves. On Friday, when we arrived there, we had eaten neither dinner or supper. We were furnished bakers and raw ham from the camp, and crackers and cheese by some German citizens. But I suppose that was good enough for common men, who had gone there to drive the enemy from their town.

Our killed are Isaac Farner, Sandford Parmer and K. Lamar. Wounded-Lieutenant Scammahorn, severely; Anderson Kearney, severely; Elihu Jones, severely; Joseph Copon, 60 years old; John Stevens, in leg; O. R. Brown, slightly; Robt. Richards, Dr. Furguson, ---- Razgr, ----Barnet, H. Jones and others. Quill."

K. Lamar is probably James C Lamar 1841-1862
Sanford Parmer is probably Sanford E. Parmer, but he must have lived as he enlisted into the 1st Indiana cavalry in 1864.
Can't find much on Isaac Farner.
 
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Taylin

Corporal
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Location
Rolling hills of southern Indiana
Will upload newspaper clippings from now on unless I find the paper hard to read, at which point I will transcribe. I would transcribe from here on out but I feel that the text in the above two post serves enough to interest anyone researching this particular engagement.From Evansville Daily Journal, Sept. 27th page 2/4. Lt. Col. Wm F. Wood's report to the Governor

201806092019099961.jpg
 

Taylin

Corporal
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Location
Rolling hills of southern Indiana
Another report by Col. Crooks. He list the dead and wounded, which all seems to be accurate. "Curtis Lamar" is James C Lamar, Isaac Varner is accurate, but Simpson Palmer I cannot account for. In this report he says that his forces number 365 during the engagement and that the enemy had not less than 500. The original union force was 420ish but with the forward cavalry being routed with only few exceptions, the remaining force during the balance of the battle was 365. Anyways, below is the report from pages 292-293: "Indiana in the War of the Rebellion: Official Report of W. H. H. Terrel"

Sir:-- I have the honor to report that on Friday, the 19th inst., our gallant young townsman, Hugh Hales, a member of Colonel Netter's command, swam across the Ohio River below Owensboro, bearing the intelligence that their camp had been attacked on that morning, their Colonel (Netter) killed, and that the rebels had possession of Owensboro; and that the camp would be compelled to surrender unless speedily reinforced. I immediately dispatched the same messenger urging them to hold out a few hours, that we would be on hand, and requested them to take possession and hold some available point on the River where they could protect a crossing for us, and to indicate that point to me either by messenger or signal, which was promptly done.
The news of their disaster spread as if by magic, the entire border of our country was in a few hours aroused and on their way to the scene of action. In less than eight hours from the first intelligence, I had four hundred and fifty of our Spencer boys in the camp at Owensboro--others kept arriving during the night, until my command was increased to five hundred and fifty men. Much confusion prevailed in camp consequent upon the dead of the gallant Netter.
Most of the rebels fled at our approach. Learning, however, that there were a few squads scattered over the city arresting and paroling Union men, I detached one hundred of my men under Major Towne, for the purpose of suppressing such conduct, which was promptly done.
Such other disposition of my men as in the opinion of the commanding officers exigencies of the case seemed to require.
About this time, eight o'clock. P.M., Lieutenant Colonel Wood, of the First Indiana Cavalry, arrived on the ground and very properly assumed command, infusing confidence and restoring order.
Shortly after, reliable evidence reach our quarters that the rebels were in camp eight miles out on Livermore Road, and an attack was determined on. Accordingly a command was organized under the supervision of Colonel Wood, which left Owensboro at two o'clock next morning. This command consisted of one 6-pound gun, sixty of Netter's mounted men, and three hundred and fifty of my infantry. Major Towne was assigned to the cavalry, the gun to Sergeant J. C. Finch, of the Indiana Legion, I assumed command of my infantry, Colonel Wood commanding the whole.
We arrived in front of their encampment between daylight and sunrise. Whether by accident or imprudent design, the cavalry became engaged with the entire force of the enemy, before either our gun or infantry were in supporting distance. Two blast's from the enemy's cannon and a round of small arms put them to confused flight, no more to be heard from till long after the battle was over.
Nine of the cavalry were captured and paroled by the enemy, two or three wounded. among whom was William J. Hale, of our place, now a member of Netter's command ; he was paroled and arrived in camp the same evening. On hearing the engagement opened by our cavalry we advanced rapidly till in range of our gun, which was immediately brought to bear on the enemy charged with canister. At the third round it was disabled and taken to the rear. No alternative was now left but to close in with out infantry, which was done in beautiful style. Our men moved up with the steady tramp of veterans, under the booming of the enemy's cannon and volley's of musketry, to a point indicated, and returned fire with the deadly aim that only back-woodsmen know so well how to do.
The position attained by this rapid movement was an excellent one. We were screened by a fence with the advantage of a ditch made by throwing up a road not less than two feet deep, and doubtless accounts for our comparatively small loss. This position we held, pouring volley after volley of well-aimed musketry, until their lines began to waver and give way, when Colonel Wood, with a portion of the command, gallantly charged the heights they occupied, driving them in complete and perfect confusion. Thus terminated the battle of Panther Creek.
No troops could have done better. They bravely withstood the fire of the enemy for nearly one hour and a half without the least wavering, steadily pressing forward, driving the enemy inch by inch, until he was completely scattered in dismay. The enemy played upon us with a small cannon all the while, with sacks of minnie balls, but evidently over-shot very much, a mistake probably caused by their own altitude.
I cannot risk mentioning the names in detail for fear of doing injustice to some. It is sufficient to say that all did well. Knowing the material of which the Legion is composed, I thought well of it, but now my confidence is boundless.
I have taken some pains to ascertain the number of the enemy, and conviction is that he had no less than five hundred men, nor not materially over. Our command engaged did not exceed three hundred and sixty-five men including three or four of the cavalry that finally fell in with us together with three or four citizens of Owensboro.
I bear willing testimony to the gallant conduct of Lieutenant Colonel William F. Wood, of the First Indiana Cavalry. He is a brace and accomplished officer. Nor can I refrain from speaking in terms of commendation of Lieutenant L. C. Parker, of the Legion, who was at all times where duty called, calm and collected.
To Dr. J. S. Hougland, I hereby return my hearty thanks ; he was on hand in the fight and kindly volunteered his professional services in taking care of the wounded.
The loss of the enemy, was killed and counted on the field thirty-six, wounded and found upon the field some fifteen, besides the enemy took away two wagon loads of their wounded during the engagement. The entire loss of the enemy in killed and wounded is acknowledged by them to be between seventy-five and eighty, and we took sixteen prisoners, besides a large number of guns, pistols, sabers, saddles, blankets and horses. Our loss, three killed and thirty-five wounded as follows :
Killed--Simpson Palmer, Isaac Varner, Curtis Lamar.
Wounded--James Naney, right arm badly ; Peter McCradie, three places badly ; Joel Shrusbery, neck badly ; J. W. Ferguson, thigh slightly ; B. M. Miller, ankle slightly ; Simon Barns, slightly ; J. A. Ferguson, leg badly ; W. Y. Kencaid, leg slightly ; J. M. Anderson, thigh badly ; John Stevens, thigh slightly ; Frank Woods, thigh slightly ; Charles Ray, in cheek slightly ; John Scamahorn, shoulder badly ; W. A. Karney, in neck severely ; George Medcalf, leg badly ; B. F. Brady, slightly ; Samuel Tenant, slightly ; W. Huff, shoulder slightly ; William Haines, in foot slightly ; Dan bellville, chest slightly ; Samuel Jones, breast slightly ; John Cahoon, thigh severely ; Jerry Sidwell, leg badly ; Sebron Jones, shoulder slightly ; Dave Bingle, nose slightly ; Stephen Parker, hand badly ; Levi Haines, hip and heel ; Lewis Meeks, leg slightly ; S. R. Rice, in shoulder slightly ; A. J. Whitehouse, shoulder ; J. M. Howland, in thigh ; O. R. Brown, slightly ; Andrew Rasor, thigh slightly ; Cal Rasor, spent ball on head ; John Jones, in head, slightly.

Yours trully
J. W. Crooks,
Colonel Commanding Legion.
 

Taylin

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Rolling hills of southern Indiana
As a side note, I have found that many if not all the wounded men applied for pensions, but obviously not being a part the federal service had a hard time. It seems they all eventually got their pension, at least, that was implied by an article I read where Samuel Tennant got his. Also found a pension application by a minor, under Isaac Varner, who was killed. It was accepted it seems.
 

Taylin

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Evansville Daily Journal, August 20th 1871. Page 2/4. Story begins first towards the bottom of the 1st column, the battle is described in good detail with a flanking maneuver mentioned that has previously gone omitted. Sutherland's (A. C. Sutherland) farm is mentioned as being the battlefield, on the 1876 atlas for daviess county he owns the plot on the eastern side of the road, which is interesting because the historical marker and a DoC marker are on the opposite side of the road. But he could have owned a large portion of the area, and the description of the heights that the cannon was on fits more in line with where the markers are. Anyways, enjoy.
201806130626035216.jpg

I just happened to notice that the second and third (this) newspaper clippings are a bit hard to read when you're looking at them in full size, this isn't the case for me when they are on my computer but I'm betting it's the file type and being scrunched into the forum etc etc, here they are in better quality -
Evansville Daily Journal, Sept 22
Evansville Daily Journal August 20 1871
 
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Taylin

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Can't believe I didn't look into this sooner, as in the second newspaper clipping describes the confederates being a part of "Colonel Johnson's regiment of hospital plunderers." Yeah, it's that Johnson. Stovepipe Johnson. So it would seem the battle was between the 4th Regiment Indiana Legion and the 10th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry (Johnson's) under the command of Robert Martin, possibly Robert Maxwell Martin who has quite the story to tell but that's not for this thread.

It looks like two companies of the 10th were largely from Daviess County, this explains the attitude of the citizens of Owensboro towards the Legion.
 
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Taylin

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Rolling hills of southern Indiana
Taken from "The Partisan Rangers of the Confederate States Army" Pages 348 and 349.

Colonel Martin now advanced upon the beautiful city of Owensboro at daylight, September 19, 1862, and found there Colonel Netter with about four hundred men and one piece of artillery. They were camped in the fair grounds below the town. The Confederates captured a few soldiers who were found in the town, and so far as the city itself was concerned, they had it all their own way. Martin sent in a demand for the surrender of the camp to Colonel Netter, but was refused. Martin had previously sent the companies of Captain S. B. Taylor, J. S. Chapman, and Clay Merriwether below the camp, and thus had the enemy completely surrounded. Netter came out with a company to reconnoiter the force below his camp and see, it has been recently learned, if he could find any way to save his horses if he was compelled to surrender. This Federal commander was killed in a skirmish with this force, but the Confederates did not know it until the next day. Martin decided that it was not best to attack the Federals in the position they held as they had already captured in the town what they most needed --- ammunition. They quietly marched out and camped on the Sutherland farm ten miles out on the Halford Road, with the intention of attacking a regiment that was being formed by Colonel Shanks, to be called the Twelfth Kentucky Cavalry. It was heard next morning that the Indiana Legion had come across the river to Owensboro and would give the Confederates battle if they would wait for them. The next morning the Twelfth Kentucky charged the Confederate forces in great style, but upon being repulsed they retreated and appeared no more upon the scene.

Martin requested Owen to accompany him upon a reconnaissance of the Indiana forces. Riding through the woods parallel to the road, they came within sight of their Infantry and artillery a quarter of a mile beyond Panther creek upon the Owensboro Road. Both of these Confederate officers could not resist taking a pop at the nearest of the enemy, then galloped back to their camp, and much to their surprise their fire not being returned. Martin at once marched his regiment down to a level meadow, relinquishing the strong position they were occupying on the hill and ridge near the Sutherland residence. He formed his men about eighty yards from a heavy stake and rider fence running parallel to the big road and within a few feet of same, and there awaited an attack. There was a ditch between the fence and the road which Martin had failed to discover until too late to remedy the mistake, as the Yankees had crawled up that ditch and put the muzzle of their guns through the fence just above the bottom of the ground rails. Thus entirely shielded, they poured a murderous fire into the Confederate forces, killing a number of splendid men, among them James Keach, orderly sergeant of Captain Fisher's Company B; George Berry, of Company F; Richard Dunville, orderly sergeant of Company A, as well as many others, numbering thirty-six in all, killed and wounded. The Federals being much greater in numbers and shielded by their strong breastworks, the Confederates were compelled to withdraw after standing their ground bravely for some time. They were not followed more than a half a mile, then recrossing the river at Ashby's ferry, they camped for the remainder of the night on the opposite bank.
 

Taylin

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Rolling hills of southern Indiana
Newspaper Clipping, The Owensboro Monitor, Sep 24th 1862. Here we have some more details, the History of Daviess County Kentucky mostly uses this account of the skirmish. Some of the Confederate dead and wounded are listed here which is nice to have.
Panther Creek Owensboro.jpg

The NPS list this action as "Sutherland Farm" Sep 19th 1862.
 
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Taylin

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I have been fortunate enough to get in contact with someone at the Daviess County Historical Society who has provided me with more information regarding this engagement including some first hand accounts and a good deal about the action at Owensboro. She kindly took the time to scour at least 3 books that they have to provide me with this and has my thanks. They are in PDF format. Here are the pages. The first file is in the best detail, the second more or less giving a TL-DR account. The third describes the deeding of land to the UDC for a marker in 1940 as well as the ceremony that took place after.
 

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leftyhunter

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los angeles ca
I have been fortunate enough to get in contact with someone at the Daviess County Historical Society who has provided me with more information regarding this engagement including some first hand accounts and a good deal about the action at Owensboro. She kindly took the time to scour at least 3 books that they have to provide me with this and has my thanks. They are in PDF format. Here are the pages. The first file is in the best detail, the second more or less giving a TL-DR account. The third describes the deeding of land to the UDC for a marker in 1940 as well as the ceremony that took place after.
Interesting account. We often overlook the role of milita on the Civil War. Most of the time the milita is engaged in counterinsurgency warfare. The Battle of Panther Creek is a conspicuous exception of the rule.
Leftyhunter
 
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Interesting account. We often overlook the role of milita on the Civil War. Most of the time the milita is engaged in counterinsurgency warfare. The Battle of Panther Creek is a conspicuous exception of the rule.
Leftyhunter
In the civil war wasn't the bulk of both armies raised as State Militias? For example the 20th Maine was raised as the 20th Maine Volunteer Militia

I always took it Lincolns initial call for troops was answered solely by state militias.
 

leftyhunter

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In the civil war wasn't the bulk of both armies raised as State Militias? For example the 20th Maine was raised as the 20th Maine Volunteer Militia

I always took it Lincolns initial call for troops was answered solely by state militias.
No really. Originally Lincoln did call for 90 day militia. However the United States Volunteers were full time troops who aa time went in received a fair amount of training.
By definition milita men are part tine and generally receive very little training and their officers also are barely trained at best.
Has a rule milita men were not entitled to pensions although apparently the Indiana Legion had some political pull and got theirs.
The Missouri State Militia is a bit of a misnomer since they were full time and paid troops and some of them fought in other states i.e. Alabama and Arkansas.
Leftyhunter
 
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No really. Originally Lincoln did call for 90 day militia. However the United States Volunteers were full time troops who aa time went in received a fair amount of training.
By definition milita men are part tine and generally receive very little training and their officers also are barely trained at best.
Has a rule milita men were not entitled to pensions although apparently the Indiana Legion had some political pull and got theirs.
The Missouri State Militia is a bit of a misnomer since they were full time and paid troops and some of them fought in other states i.e. Alabama and Arkansas.
Leftyhunter
From what I read they didn't start "federalizing" the Militias until after the 90 day call

Even prewar volunteer militia that drilled part-time and unpaid, wasn't its existence so it could be activated and called up if needed?
 
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