Discussion Baseball in the Civil War

Grant's Tomb

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The one constant through all the years has been baseball. Delivered so well by James Earl Jones

The Yankees and the White Sox were scheduled to play a game at that field this year. Did you know that Shoeless Joe Jackson had been taught how to bat by a Confederate veteran who had learned his baseball from Union soldiers in a northern prison camp? He had initially wanted to be a pitcher but he broke his catcher's arm with a wild pitch.
 

hoosier

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The Field of Dreams game is still scheduled to be played, but since there is no room in the abbreviated schedule for games between Eastern and Central Division teams, the Cardinals have been named as the White Sox' opponent. The game is to take place on August 13.
 

Grant's Tomb

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Here's a clip from the film Eight Men Out about the Black Sox scandal. Shoeless Joe comes to bat in what's the last game of the 1919 season. It's interesting that pitcher Lefty Williams is portrayed by James Read who played George Hazard in the North and South miniseries. Williams and Jackson were southerners and they hung out together. When Williams agreed to be part of the scheme to throw the World Series, Jackson went along with him, although shortstop Swede Risberg had to talk him in to joining the others.
 

Booklady

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Probably stating what's well known, but Grant's Tomb's post makes me think of degrees of separation. Field of Dreams includes scenes from "Chisolm, Minnesota" that were filmed in Galena, Illinois, the site of two homes of US Grant.

Galena is a very cool town to visit. I was there two years ago and climbed up and, after walking past Grant's first home, later descended all those steps in the Ray Kinsella - Doc Graham scene. My calves hurt for days but it was worth it. About time to watch that movie again. I'm sad that Mookie Betts' outlandish new contract has finally put me off the modern game.
 

KianGaf

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Here's a clip from the film Eight Men Out about the Black Sox scandal. Shoeless Joe comes to bat in what's the last game of the 1919 season. It's interesting that pitcher Lefty Williams is portrayed by James Read who played George Hazard in the North and South miniseries. Williams and Jackson were southerners and they hung out together. When Williams agreed to be part of the scheme to throw the World Series, Jackson went along with him, although shortstop Swede Risberg had to talk him in to joining the others.

That’s a good movie, John Mahoney plays a good role as does David Strathairn.
 

KianGaf

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Probably stating what's well known, but Grant's Tomb's post makes me think of degrees of separation. Field of Dreams includes scenes from "Chisolm, Minnesota" that were filmed in Galena, Illinois, the site of two homes of US Grant.

Galena is a very cool town to visit. I was there two years ago and climbed up and, after walking past Grant's first home, later descended all those steps in the Ray Kinsella - Doc Graham scene. My calves hurt for days but it was worth it. About time to watch that movie again. I'm sad that Mookie Betts' outlandish new contract has finally put me off the modern game.

Id be inclined to feel the same way about overpriced sports stars. The only thing is Mookie Betts will come and go , so if you enjoy a ball game just watch one on tv or go to one (when you can) . The MLB has been quite entertaining this week aswell for a variety of on & off field events.
 

Booklady

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I live on Cape Cod. We are missing the Cape League this year. I haven't tuned in to the Red Sox because I am just so disgusted about that nearly $400,000,000. And I love Mookie. But that's outrageous at any time, let alone when so many are out of work. I'll probably get over it but not for a while.
 

KianGaf

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I live on Cape Cod. We are missing the Cape League this year. I haven't tuned in to the Red Sox because I am just so disgusted about that nearly $400,000,000. And I love Mookie. But that's outrageous at any time, let alone when so many are out of work. I'll probably get over it but not for a while.

Id totally agree that those kind of figures are obscene. They are even more so when the ordinary fans pay for it via high ticket prices , more expensive hot dogs and beers in the ballpark etc. It was mentioned earlier in the thread that the minors seems to be where folk can have a good night out for reasonable prices and not break the bank.
 

Grant's Tomb

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I live on Cape Cod. We are missing the Cape League this year. I haven't tuned in to the Red Sox because I am just so disgusted about that nearly $400,000,000. And I love Mookie. But that's outrageous at any time, let alone when so many are out of work. I'll probably get over it but not for a while.
Ever seen the film Summer Catch?
 
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
Having wandered here because of the ostensible topic (baseball in the Civil War), I thought I'd mention that during the long lull between naval engagements during the Port Hudson campaign (spring-summer 1863), the tars of the USS Essex formed baseball teams, fifteen to a side, and played frequently and earnestly on Prophet's Island, where the ironclad was anchored. Amateurs all, with only the joy of the game for compensation.
 

Booklady

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I have a whole bookcase full of baseball fiction and nonfiction, and Kate's post gently reminding us of the thread topic sent me over there to take a look for Civil War era titles. I found the novel " Perfect Silence," by Jeff Hutton, which I had forgotten about. It's the story of a Southern farm boy who loves to play baseball. He and a friend join the Confederate army in 1864. He gets wounded, is left for dead, and rescues a wounded Union soldier and saves that man's letter to his sweetheart. He ends up in a prison camp, and later a great player, though damaged human being. Baseball and that letter's recipient save him.
 

Joshism

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Baseball has no significant point of origin.

Ken Burns documentary gives credit to the New York Knickerbockers Base Ball Club. They seem to deserve as much credit as anyone, if not necessarily sole credit.

This is always kicked down to the fans who pay big money into games then have to pay a high cost for food and drink inside.

Professional sports has fallen into the supply & demand trap. Capitalism dictates as long as enough people will pay to see the games the price isn't too high. Deflating ticket prices and player salaries would require price controls and other things that would be...very controversial.
 
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