Tell me more! Austrian M1849 "Kammerbushe"

Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Location
Texas
Hey folks, I got some questions about this rifle. The M1849 Kammerbusche always fascinated me, it stands out amongst the Springfields, Enfields, and Lorenzs of the War. What I like most about it is that is a bigger caliber, .71, and it's slightly shorter than the usual rifled muskets of the day. It's not exactly a carbine, but it's not that long either, does this serve a purpose? How many we're used? We're they liked? I've also seen an M1844 model "Kammerbushe," are these the same thing?

https://www.trans-mississippirelics.com/product-page/austrian-m1849-jeagerbushe-rifle
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Location
Texas
The Muster 1844 has the same general dimensions as the M1849, but it is easily differentiated by its use of three brass barrel bands to secure the barrel. Other differences are seen in the shape of the triggerguard, as well as the sights, and the presence of a Laukart bayonet clasp under the barrel. Some examples are found sliding wood covered patchboxes.

It seems no distinction was made by US ordnance officials in separating the guns based on model and that the M1844 and M1849 were both lumped together when inventoried. As with most European arms with bores larger than standard US calibers, their accuracy suffered from improperly sized ammunition.
Length wise, they are generally comparable with most other period "rifles" regardless of origin. The nominally 33 inch barrel length was pretty standard for use in short rifles intended to arm riflemen, or "Jaegers" as the Austrians might say. More well known rifles with similar lengths include the British Pattern 1856/58/60/61 Rifles, and the US Model 1841 and Model 1855 Rifles.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Location
Texas
The Muster 1844 has the same general dimensions as the M1849, but it is easily differentiated by its use of three brass barrel bands to secure the barrel. Other differences are seen in the shape of the triggerguard, as well as the sights, and the presence of a Laukart bayonet clasp under the barrel. Some examples are found sliding wood covered patchboxes.

It seems no distinction was made by US ordnance officials in separating the guns based on model and that the M1844 and M1849 were both lumped together when inventoried. As with most European arms with bores larger than standard US calibers, their accuracy suffered from improperly sized ammunition.
Length wise, they are generally comparable with most other period "rifles" regardless of origin. The nominally 33 inch barrel length was pretty standard for use in short rifles intended to arm riflemen, or "Jaegers" as the Austrians might say. More well known rifles with similar lengths include the British Pattern 1856/58/60/61 Rifles, and the US Model 1841 and Model 1855 Rifles.
"It seems no distinction was made by US ordnance officials in separating the guns based on model and that the M1844 and M1849 were both lumped together when inventoried. As with most European arms with bores larger than standard US calibers, their accuracy suffered from improperly sized ammunition."

Were they using the .58 cal Minnie from the Springfield? They weren't using the .71 cal bullet?

"Length wise, they are generally comparable with most other period "rifles" regardless of origin. The nominally 33 inch barrel length was pretty standard for use in short rifles intended to arm riflemen, or "Jaegers" as the Austrians might say. More well known rifles with similar lengths include the British Pattern 1856/58/60/61 Rifles, and the US Model 1841 and Model 1855 Rifles."

Yuh know it's interesting, I saw the M1849 held up against the 1853 Enfield and it just seemed so short.
 
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