Atlanta Cyclorama being Moved!!!

CheathamHill

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Oct 4, 2013
Good move. Hopefully the Texas and the remainder of the "museum" artifacts will move with the painting and be merged into the History Center's existing collection.
The Texas Will be acquiesced and used accordingly by Marta. The color scheme is said to be the same Orange and Silver though there are hints of an upgrade.
 

28thNewYork

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Feb 21, 2014
Location
Atlanta
The Texas Will be acquiesced and used accordingly by Marta. The color scheme is said to be the same Orange and Silver though there are hints of an upgrade.
Used to work downtown near Five Points and rode the bus (pre-MARTA) from Virginia-Highlands. The train was better than sliced bread when it started. Currently, the Texas might be an improvement.
 

Chattahooch33

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Cobb's Legion Country - Bowdon, Ga.
OK so I know it wasn't named after 'that' Grant, but I still loved that the Atlanta Civil War Museum was in a park with the same name that beat the Confederacy.

'This" Grant is Lemuel P. Grant. He was a founding father of Atlanta and a principal business man. He owned tons of strategic land around Atlanta and made big money selling it. When the war came he was in charge of planning and overseeing the building of the defensive works of Atlanta. His compass and the original map that I posted below are on display. After the war Grant donated the land that became Grant Park and his house, a shell of its former self, still stands.

th.jpg


civilwar-2.jpg


This is the first draft of the defenses but not totally what was built. They realized that the northwest quadrant, though on better ground, was too close to the city and cannon fire could easily (easier that it was) fire into the rail works. The extended the line out to connect the outlier forts V,W,X,Y, and Z. Fort X became Fort Hood that is seen in all the Ponder House pictures. To the bottom right is Fort R which is now Fort Walker in Grant Park. Fort S just to the northwest would be right in his house's front yard.
Fort U is basically under Turner Field.





Fort D is where this photo was taken:

7aa2164742039c482a867ae22cf6e9ea.jpg





Fort I looking west basically from the entrance to Bobby Dodd stadium at Georgia Tech:

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This picture is the frontside (northwest face) of Fort Hood (X) showing where the Marietta Rd passes through the works. The Ponder House can be seen in the far right.
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I got a little carried away..........
 

robert hayden

Private
Joined
Jul 27, 2011
Location
White Pine, Tennessee
Agreed, I stared at it awhile wondering "am I supposed to understand this and just not getting it or what?"

I visited the Cyclorama about 90 days ago. There was a young black man in a Abraham Lincoln costume that served
as the narrator to the unfolding scenes as the painting revolved. I'm thinking it was maybe a 12 minute performance
that most likely had been scripted for him. He was an excellent performer, sharing his script in a clear concise tone that
was unhurried yet easily kept pace with the changing scenes. He was a positive aspect that I hope will remain with that
presentation.

Incidently, the Cyclorama discouraged taking photographs in the building, although almost everyone did on the sly.
The Texas was displayed in a rather confined space, making it difficult to get a good shot of the entire exhibit. Perhaps
the new location can remedy those limitations.
 

James N.

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I visited the Cyclorama about 90 days ago. There was a young black man in a Abraham Lincoln costume that served
as the narrator to the unfolding scenes as the painting revolved. I'm thinking it was maybe a 12 minute performance that most likely had been scripted for him. He was an excellent performer, sharing his script in a clear concise tone that was unhurried yet easily kept pace with the changing scenes. He was a positive aspect that I hope will remain with that presentation.

He was there last year in May when I visited too, though sans costume; I didn't care for him much but imagine he's good to keep the wandering minds of schoolkids more focused on the experience.
 

Joe Walker

Private
Joined
Mar 6, 2013
As boy in the 1950's I loved the way they painting was narrated by Victor Jory. Plus, you walked up on to a round balcony the middle of the rotundra, a view as if you were standing on a water tank on the railroad running through the battlefield. The painting was lit up in 20 degree increments per the narration. Your eyes and mind began playing tricks on you as the painting and the diorama merged. The diorama figures were made out of proportion from head to toe to make the effect work since you were looking "down" on them. When I returned from the Navy in 1970 they had completely screwed it up. You only see 20% of the painting at a time (the seats/middle rotate) and you sit on seats that go higher each row......ruining the effects. You must sit higher than half way up to "get the perspective". I understand they are attempting to return to the pre-1970 ruination. In fact, perhaps to the 1920's. I would hate to see the Texas not be at the Cyclorama..........it was there I learned after seeing the movie "The Great Locomotive Chase" that Davy Crockett was a yankee!! (apology to Fess Parker).
 

robert hayden

Private
Joined
Jul 27, 2011
Location
White Pine, Tennessee
As boy in the 1950's I loved the way they painting was narrated by Victor Jory. Plus, you walked up on to a round balcony the middle of the rotundra, a view as if you were standing on a water tank on the railroad running through the battlefield. The painting was lit up in 20 degree increments per the narration. Your eyes and mind began playing tricks on you as the painting and the diorama merged. The diorama figures were made out of proportion from head to toe to make the effect work since you were looking "down" on them. When I returned from the Navy in 1970 they had completely screwed it up. You only see 20% of the painting at a time (the seats/middle rotate) and you sit on seats that go higher each row......ruining the effects. You must sit higher than half way up to "get the perspective". I understand they are attempting to return to the pre-1970 ruination. In fact, perhaps to the 1920's. I would hate to see the Texas not be at the Cyclorama..........it was there I learned after seeing the movie "The Great Locomotive Chase" that Davy Crockett was a yankee!! (apology to Fess Parker).

meaning Fess Parker was a yankee ?? and not Davy Crockett, the Backwoods gentleman from Tennessee ?
 
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