Articles about Confederate monuments in African-American newspapers

19thGeorgia

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#21
So yes in an era if political terror that would last a long time black newspapers had very good reason to be deferential to white Southerners Confederate Monuments.
Leftyhunter
...even newspapers in Kansas and Ohio?


National Reflector (Wichita, KS), April 24, 1897-
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Cleveland Gazette, June 6, 1914 ("The monument is in the memory of the heroic men and women of the south")-

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#24
Why is a black newspaper giving train schedules for the attendance at the laying of a cornerstone for a Confederate monument?

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Because if enough African Americans pretend to show support for Confederate monuments maybe they won't get lynched next time. Remember terrorism does work more often than not.
Leftyhunter
 
#28
The old-fashioned respect for the dead?
Possibly. How about the possibility that as a business that wanted to make money, they wanted to have as many subscribers as possible. Just because they were a Black owned newspaper does not necessarily mean they had to appeal to only the Black community, IMHO.
 

uaskme

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#29
Possibly. How about the possibility that as a business that wanted to make money, they wanted to have as many subscribers as possible. Just because they were a Black owned newspaper does not necessarily mean they had to appeal to only the Black community, IMHO.
So, White People subscribed to Black Newspapers? Seriously?
 

archieclement

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#31
Possibly. How about the possibility that as a business that wanted to make money, they wanted to have as many subscribers as possible. Just because they were a Black owned newspaper does not necessarily mean they had to appeal to only the Black community, IMHO.
Possiby, how about the possibility some of their readers were interested in attending? At confederate dedications and reunions there's photos that show blacks attended. Despite the desire of some today to paint them all with one brush, they were divided also. There's ample evidence when when union troops passed through an area they didn't all run away, nor did all leave their former owners postwar. Nor did all only serve or identify with one side.........
 
#32
Possiby, how about the possibility some of their readers were interested in attending? At confederate dedications and reunions there's photos that show blacks attended. Despite the desire of some today to paint them all with one brush, they were divided also. There's ample evidence when when union troops passed through an area they didn't all run away, nor did all leave their former owners postwar. Nor did all only serve or identify with one side.........
That's also a possibility.
 
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#33
With regard to white attitudes toward blacks, don't assume there was monolithic disdain or hatred. Consider this 1901 article from a South Carolina newspaper. The Comptroller General received a letter protesting a Confederate pension for a black man in Abbeville County. The newspaper refers to this protest as "little minded".

The Batesburg advocate. [volume] (Batesburg, S.C.) 1901-1911, March 27, 1901
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#35
Can you give us examples of blacks who were killed because they didn't attend a Confederate monument ceremony?
This is what I'd like to see, actual evidence that black people went to monument dedications because they were afraid not to, rather than very broad unsupported assertions, based on assumption and opinion.
 
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#36
Very interesting, and they seem to be reported as a matter of course without editorial comment.
The installation of these monuments was news. I would assume they would report this news regardless of how they thought about it. Meanwhile, I don't know how wise it would be a black newspaper in the South to write negative comments about Confederate monuments.

- Alan
 
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#37
Can you give us examples of blacks who were killed because they didn't attend a Confederate monument ceremony?
Self preservation is a powerful motivation. Southern whites executed quite a few blacks to maintain white supremacy. This is during a time period when despite being at least thirteen percent of the population there would be no black elected officials until federal intervention. This was during a period when " blacks knew their place". When no white man ever went to jail for rape but a black man could go to prison for dating as white women.
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#39
Talking about lynching at all takes us away from the thread topic. But I do want to mention that one of the most famous antagonists of Jim Crow lynching was Ida B. Wells. As noted in wiki:

Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931), more commonly known as Ida B. Wells, was an African-American investigative journalist, educator, and an early leader in the Civil Rights Movement. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). She arguably became the most famous black woman in America, during a life that was centered on combating prejudice and violence.​
Wells was born into slavery in Holly Springs, Mississippi. She was freed by the Emancipation Proclamation during the American Civil War. At the age of 16, she lost both her parents and her infant brother in the 1878 yellow fever epidemic. She went to work and kept the rest of the family intact with the help of her grandmother. Wells moved with some of her siblings to Memphis, Tennessee, where she found better pay as a teacher. Soon she co-owned the newspaper, Memphis Free Speech and Headlight.​
In the 1890s, Wells documented lynching in the United States, investigating frequent claims of whites that lynchings were reserved for black criminals only. Wells exposed lynching as a barbaric practice of whites in the South used to intimidate and oppress African Americans, who created economic and political competition and a subsequent threat of loss of power for whites. A white mob destroyed her newspaper office and presses, as her investigative reporting was carried nationally in black-owned newspapers.
Subjected to continued threats, Wells left Memphis for Chicago.

Make no mistake about it, black newspapers in the Jim Crow South had to watch their P and Qs, to use an old expression. Jim Crow was not a time where African Americans had the freedom to say what they wanted. Indeed, by definition Jim Crow was a period when African Americans were denied the rights, privileges, and opportunities that were enjoyed by white Southerners.

Of course Jim Crow affected what black newspapers could write. I would hope that the audience for this forum doesn't need this to be proven to them.

- Alan
 
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