Discussion Are Fewer Women Interested In The Civil War? If So, Why?

alan polk

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#61
but sometimes when I’m trying to talk about it with a man (interested in it) they are sometimes suspicious of mine or any woman’s motives. I ran into this at Harpers Ferry with my sister standing next to me! The battlefield guide was so taken aback he came out and said it! Sigh.
I’m like @Mark F. Jenkins on this. That is odd and unfortunate. I might imagine myself being excited that a woman was interested in, say, battles or tactics, and I might ... I don’t know ... I might express that excitement a bit more than I would if it were a man; but I don’t think I would ever find myself being suspicious about a woman’s motives concerning that interest.

Just out of curiosity- and to make sure I never leave any such perception- what motives do they suspect? Do they come out and say that? or is it implied somehow? I’m certainly sorry that has happened to you or any other woman.
 

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Belle Montgomery

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#62

lelliott19

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#63
Ive also run into that kind of thing @NH Civil War Gal It's like they think its some kind of a test or something? Like we are engaging their services as a clandestine operation? Or maybe the park service has sent us as a test - and we are going to "report" them if they aren't attentive enough or, if they are too attentive? Or, even worse, we have plotted and planned exact questions that we intend to use to trip them up? It doesn't help when you have a published author <thinking it will be funny?> tell you to be sure and ask about this incident or that, and so you do. And it winds up being a huge touchy-point with the person guiding. :nah disagree:Especially since you literally had no idea and just want to know what happened where. :redface:

Also, I've noticed that most guides/interpreters assume that its my husband who is actually interested in the military minutia. He is interested on what I'd call a superficial level.....where was my 2x great grandfather's regiment? But they talk to him, rarely making eye contact with me, until I ask a question like - "I read about that battery in Falligant's memoirs- is that where his battery was? over there? And what regiments of Clingmans brigade were on the left that fell back?" And, "I read a letter from a guy in the 87th PA about this. How far up into Bloody Run did the 87th Pennsylvania get?" And then, yes, I'd say some interpret the questions with suspicion. And then Im disappointed, because it was an opportunity for me to engage in conversation with someone who knows way more than me, but Ive ruined it I guess, by asking for details. :sick:
 
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#64
I'm glad this topic came up because women don't seem to be very visible here outside the cooking-type topics.

I was not especially interested in any war until wars became part of my family history research, which I'm passionate about. In preparing to publish my great-great-grandfather's diary I started researching what his regiment did in the Civil War, and here I am!

I assume I've never been interested in wars because violence repulses me, and I assume being repulsed by violence is common among women. (Definitely not universal!) Yet I'm now immersed in the Red River Campaign and the battles of Pleasant Hill and Pilot Knob. Death, blood, gore, animal suffering. The treatment of soldiers--inhumane marches, delayed paychecks, lack of food. And military politics--incompetent leaders, drunkenness, lies, conflicting reports, unfairness. I've realized the Corps d'Afrique fought at Pleasant Hill but I have not been able to find a report from that brigade's commander and only ONE of the many other commanders' reports mentioned it. And just the tragedy of all the lives lost. And Americans fighting Americans! As you can see, I've become fascinated by the war and could go on and on.

Anyway, I'm thrilled to have found this site. I half-expected to be ignored or talked down to by men here, but that hasn't been the case at all and I appreciate it.
 

WJC

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#65
On the other hand my personal resistance to the idea of past lives may stem from a patent refusal to believe we have to come back and do this alllll over again. Just no. Worst cosmic practable joke ever if true.
Groundhog Day.
 

lelliott19

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#66
women don't seem to be very visible here outside the cooking-type topics.
Hi LSBusch. There are lots of us here and some of us do post in forums other than cooking. Join in and discuss with us! As a whole, the men here are awesome. They respect our opinions and are always willing to help.
I half-expected to be ignored or talked down to by men here
That may be why some women might be reluctant start threads? And so women are less visible? I dont know. But I have found that you can count on the men here to respond and help with details - especially the tactics, movements, and strategy stuff. This is a place where I dont think you have to worry about being ignored or talked down to. Maybe post up a thread about Pleasant Hill? with your questions? It's great to have another woman aboard and I'll be looking for your Red River campaign thread.:wink:
 
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#67
Just to be clear, folks who consider themselves to be an “old soul” don't necessarily believe in reincarnation. I’ve heard folks refer to someone as an “old soul” all my life. This simply meant the person was thoughtful and introspective, loved learning (always had their head in a book) and related best to folks that were older. Only children were (are) often characterized this way – myself included. Growing up as an only child I spent most of my time around older people and felt comfortable conversing and interacting with them.

When you define “old soul” in that way, I think a lot of history lovers would fit the definition. I’m sure there are members of CWT who connect being an “old soul” with having lived a past life. I respect that and don’t want any member here to feel disrespected for saying so.

@LSBusch, I'm so glad you shared your thoughts and I'm even more glad you have joined CWT! Like @lelliott19 said, we're here and we contribute in lots of places. I enjoy co-hosting the Mid-19th Century Life forum, but I frequently post in other forums. The ladies here are very supportive of one another and the gentlemen welcome and respect our participation. The guys who disagree with us (me) disagree with some of the fellows as well. I have never felt like my point of view was discounted because I'm female.


Edited to remove reference to a prior poster. :smile:
 
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Norm53

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#68
I consider human adult behavior to be a product of three developmental causes that operated from the first appearance of Homo to the present day: (1) genetics, (2) family environment, and (3) local culture. While these causes operate at an individual level, they explain the average differences in roles played by women and men in adult life, in general, and in particular with respect to differences in behavior towards ACW and participation in CWT forums.

With advances in science, technology, and more stable governments over millennia, including improvements in labor productivity, women were and are able to assume more and more non-domestic roles, which they have sought for a long time - perhaps ever since Homo appeared.

I can easily imagine that in the future, family environments and local cultures will continue changing so that women will assume all roles in society that are not restricted by genetics, although even that assessment can be challenged by current advances in that science and technolgy. I wouldn't be surprised that in the not-too-distant future, CWT will be owned by a female.
 

lelliott19

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#69
"I read about that battery in Falligant's memoirs- is that where his battery was? over there? And what regiments of Clingmans brigade were on the left that fell back?" And, "I read a letter from a guy in the 87th PA about this. How far up into Bloody Run did the 87th Pennsylvania get?"
IDK maybe I just ask too many questions? For me, it might be my only opportunity to visit that particular battlefield before I write the book, so I want to learn as much as possible during that visit. Do you guys think I need to hold back on my questions? I mean, I usually make it clear that I'm researching for a regimental, so I assume they know that I'm not looking for a casual overview.
I wouldn't be surprised that in the not-too-distant future, CWT will be owned by a female.
Ummmmh. Actually it is co-owned by Mrs. @civilwartalk . Her name is @ami :D
 

Zella

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#70
IDK maybe I just ask too many questions? For me, it might be my only opportunity to visit that particular battlefield before I write the book, so I want to learn as much as possible during that visit. Do you guys think I need to hold back on my questions? I mean, I usually make it clear that I'm researching for a regimental, so I assume they know that I'm not looking for a casual overview.
No, I don't think so at all. Them being uncomfortable and unprofessional about it is their problem, not yours.
 
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#71
My interest goes as far as watching my hubs shoot black powder competitively and the pretty art I have hanging in my walls.

In our first year married I was persuaded to try a re-enactment, it was 106 degrees and the air was a swimming pool. I declared never again. That was the Gettysburg of my discontent.

I am obviously invested in the forum, but more because I’m home and gave the time to do trivia and things. I gave even gleaned some knowledge by reading the trivia questions or perusing a thread before promoted. But The Civil War is not my passion.

I do know we gave many ladies here though, I hope that means good things for womens interest in the war!
“ The Gettysburg of my discontent “ is none of the greatest phrases I have ever heard.:thumbsup:
 

alan polk

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#73
IDK maybe I just ask too many questions? For me, it might be my only opportunity to visit that particular battlefield before I write the book, so I want to learn as much as possible during that visit. Do you guys think I need to hold back on my questions? I mean, I usually make it clear that I'm researching for a regimental, so I assume they know that I'm not looking for a casual overview.

Ummmmh. Actually it is co-owned by Mrs. @civilwartalk . Her name is @ami :D
I agree with @Zella. Never stop asking questions. Everyone knows what is reasonable and what is not. Your posts, along with all the other gals on this site, have always posted up great questions that are reasonable and emanate from genuine curiosity.

I, in turn, have asked similar type questions over in Ladies Tea. I suspect that @JPK Huson 1863 thinks I might suffer from some debilitating cognitive issue after having bombarded her about 19th Century clothing. I mean, I ended up asking her the same question about 5 different ways before I could finally understand. Her patience is merciful as much as it is kind. But if I had not asked, I would still be shuffling around in ignorance.

So, even if one thinks they might look stupid asking a question should not stop one from asking.

There is a quote I like that is attributed to the Stoic philosopher, Seneca the Younger:

“If you don’t know, ask. You will be a fool for the moment, but a wise man [or woman] for the rest of your life.”

We are all in this together, so don’t stop.
 
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#76
In regards to the comments regarding the numbers of female History majors: I wanted to major in History. My parents discouraged this because we lived in an economically depressed area that didn’t recover from the collapse of the steel industry decades earlier. My dad taught several high school subjects (including History), but his school district received several hundred applications for every full-time opening. My two sisters had to move to a different state to obtain their own teaching jobs. I knew that my parents wouldn’t be able to help me pay for grad school. So, I felt pressured to choose a career that I could start immediately after college and that paid decently. I ended up working in the corporate world. That’s one of the biggest reasons that I didn’t major in History.
 

NH Civil War Gal

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#77
Ive also run into that kind of thing @NH Civil War Gal It's like they think its some kind of a test or something? Like we are engaging their services as a clandestine operation? Or maybe the park service has sent us as a test - and we are going to "report" them if they aren't attentive enough or, if they are too attentive? Or, even worse, we have plotted and planned exact questions that we intend to use to trip them up? It doesn't help when you have a published author <thinking it will be funny?> tell you to be sure and ask about this incident or that, and so you do. And it winds up being a huge touchy-point with the person guiding. :nah disagree:Especially since you literally had no idea and just want to know what happened where. :redface:

Also, I've noticed that most guides/interpreters assume that its my husband who is actually interested in the military minutia. He is interested on what I'd call a superficial level.....where was my 2x great grandfather's regiment? But they talk to him, rarely making eye contact with me, until I ask a question like - "I read about that battery in Falligant's memoirs- is that where his battery was? over there? And what regiments of Clingmans brigade were on the left that fell back?" And, "I read a letter from a guy in the 87th PA about this. How far up into Bloody Run did the 87th Pennsylvania get?" And then, yes, I'd say some interpret the questions with suspicion. And then Im disappointed, because it was an opportunity for me to engage in conversation with someone who knows way more than me, but Ive ruined it I guess, by asking for details. :sick:
Like Like Like !!!!!!
 

NH Civil War Gal

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#78
I’m like @Mark F. Jenkins on this. That is odd and unfortunate. I might imagine myself being excited that a woman was interested in, say, battles or tactics, and I might ... I don’t know ... I might express that excitement a bit more than I would if it were a man; but I don’t think I would ever find myself being suspicious about a woman’s motives concerning that interest.

Just out of curiosity- and to make sure I never leave any such perception- what motives do they suspect? Do they come out and say that? or is it implied somehow? I’m certainly sorry that has happened to you or any other woman.
Well, Alan unless you are getting to slip me a card for err “private appointment” to talk further, when they wouldn’t talk at all except to say, “this is a reversal. Women don’t like this.” After he ascertains I’m traveling alone, :help: Believe me I wasn’t afraid. I could easily outrun him up the hills at Harpers Ferry and he’d have dropped dead of a heart attack. But it Should Not Be. It was stupid and icky and farcical all at the same time.
 

Desert Kid

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#79
From personal experience? I'm the only one in my own town. Our local historian died last month.

Girls I've dated found my interest in it strange, one considered it "borderline racist", and others were dismissive because war means killing and violence. So I have found it extremely hard to relate to others. Much of my family doesn't understand it nor try to.

When I was 5 years old in 1996, my grandfather used to bounce me on his knee re-telling stories of his time in the Pacific during World War II. He died in 2001. My grandmother on mom's side, who's mom was in the DAR and grandmother in the UDC and was old enough to remember her great-grandfather who was born during the Civil War in Texas, now has an onset of dementia. It's something that's only going to fade away.
 
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#80
I don't know if fewer women are interested in the Civil War or not.............

I do know this, I am very thankful for each and every female member we have here, for they are extremely knowledgeable, wise, and very helpful in all aspects of the Civil War.....................Thank you ladies of the forum !!!!

Without the guidance, leadership, and common sense, this would be just a forum with a bunch of old men like me, butting heads, pointing fingers, and sharing a lot of sarcasm..............and not learning a thing.

Respectfully,
William

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Two countries

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