Archaeologists Search for Victims killed in Thibodaux Massacre in Louisiana

Pat Young

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#1
The Thibodaux Massacre in Louisiana in 1887 is one of the lesser known violent events of Reconstruction. Local white paramilitaries reportedly killed three dozen African Americans, many of whom had been participating in a massive strike.

Now a team of archaeologists and students are searching for the remains of some of the massacre victims. Work is just getting under way. If there are finds, I'll let you know.

http://www.wdtn.com/news/national/g...n-hunt-for-dead-in-racial-massacre/1185767363
 

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#3
I think there was a relatively recent thread on this. Anyway, it will be interesting to see if they find anything.

BTW, Thibodaux is prounced with a silent “h”, and known for a couple of things: the beautiful plantation house Rienzi with double outside stairway on the front elevation.
46CBE7D9-370F-4B57-A683-5939EAED4AE1.jpeg


and Jerry Reed’s “Amos Moses” that uses ‘45 minutes southeast of Thibodaux, Louisiana in the refrain throughout the song.

 
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Pat Young

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#4
I think there was a relatively recent thread on this. Anyway, it will be interesting to see if they find anything.

BTW, Thibodaux is prounced with a silent “h”, and known for a couple of things: the beautiful plantation house Rienzi with double outside stairway on the front elevation.
View attachment 188567

and Jerry Reed’s “Amos Moses” that uses ‘45 minutes southeast of Thibodaux, Louisiana in the refrain throughout the song.

I think you may be referring to this thread:

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/th...-1887-thibodaux-massacre-in-louisiana.140441/

And thanks for the pronunciation guidance. I definitely would not have guessed at that.
 
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#5
I think you may be referring to this thread:

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/th...-1887-thibodaux-massacre-in-louisiana.140441/

And thanks for the pronunciation guidance. I definitely would not have guessed at that.
Here is an interesting tidbit about Thibodaux from Wiki that I wasn’t aware of regarding the sugar workers there during the Civil War. When the area came under Union control the slaves were freed, organized in to a labor union and paid wages by their former owners.
__________________________

Once the area was under Union control, they ordered the slaves freed and to be paid wages. Planters in Thibodaux complained about having to negotiate labor contracts for the black workers. Alexander F. Pugh, a large sugar planter near Thibodaux, complained that:

"Negroes and federal officers took up too much time in negotiating new labor contracts. Part of the delay was occasioned by the fact that the Negroes were dissatisfied with the settlements from the past year, and additional delays were brought about because of changes in labor rules and regulations."[8] Pugh wrote in his diary: "I have agreed with the Negroes today to pay them monthly wages. It was very distasteful to me, but I could do no better. Everybody else in the neighborhood has agreed to pay the same, and mine [laborers] would listen to nothing else."[9]

1249EEA7-DCEB-4D3E-8FF8-C77587F69932.jpeg
 

Pat Young

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#6
Here is an interesting tidbit about Thibodaux from Wiki that I wasn’t aware of regarding the sugar workers there during the Civil War. When the area came under Union control the slaves were freed, organized in to a labor union and paid wages by their former owners.
__________________________

Once the area was under Union control, they ordered the slaves freed and to be paid wages. Planters in Thibodaux complained about having to negotiate labor contracts for the black workers. Alexander F. Pugh, a large sugar planter near Thibodaux, complained that:

"Negroes and federal officers took up too much time in negotiating new labor contracts. Part of the delay was occasioned by the fact that the Negroes were dissatisfied with the settlements from the past year, and additional delays were brought about because of changes in labor rules and regulations."[8] Pugh wrote in his diary: "I have agreed with the Negroes today to pay them monthly wages. It was very distasteful to me, but I could do no better. Everybody else in the neighborhood has agreed to pay the same, and mine [laborers] would listen to nothing else."[9]

View attachment 188583
Thanks for the info.
 



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