Anti-secession Resolutions Of The New York Legislature, January 11, 1861

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trice

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ANTI-SECESSION RESOLUTIONS OF THE NEW YORK LEGISLATURE
Passed by the New York State Assembly, 11 January 1861
[Text located by Sean Rogers, Furman University. Transcribed by Lloyd Benson from the New York Times, 12 January 1861]


Whereas, The insurgent State of South Carolina, after seizing the Post-offices, Custom-House, moneys and fortifications of the Federal Government, has, by firing into a vessel ordered by the Government to convey troops and provisions to Fort Sumter, virtually declared war; and

Whereas, The forts and property of the United States Government in Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana have been unlawfully seized, with hostile intentions; and

Whereas, Their Senators in Congress avow and maintain their treasonable acts; therefore,

Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Legislature of New York is profoundly impressed with the value of the Union, and determined to preserve it unimpaired; that it greets with joy the recent firm, dignified and patriotic Special Message of the President of the United States, and that we tender to him through the Chief Magistrate of our own State, whatever aid in men and money may be required to enable him to enforce the laws and uphold the authority of the Federal Government; and that, in the defence of the Union, which has conferred prosperity and happiness upon the American people, renewing the pledge given and redeemed by our fathers, we are ready to devote our fortunes, our lives, and our sacred honor.

Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Union-loving citizens and representatives of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Missouri, and Tennessee, who labor with devoted courage and patriotism to withhold their States from the vortex of secession, are entitled to the gratitude and admiration of the whole people.

Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Government be respectfully requested to forward, forthwith, copies of the foregoing resolutions to the President of the Nation, and the Governors of all the States of the Union.
 

GwilymT

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ANTI-SECESSION RESOLUTIONS OF THE NEW YORK LEGISLATURE
Passed by the New York State Assembly, 11 January 1861
[Text located by Sean Rogers, Furman University. Transcribed by Lloyd Benson from the New York Times, 12 January 1861]


Whereas, The insurgent State of South Carolina, after seizing the Post-offices, Custom-House, moneys and fortifications of the Federal Government, has, by firing into a vessel ordered by the Government to convey troops and provisions to Fort Sumter, virtually declared war; and

Whereas, The forts and property of the United States Government in Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana have been unlawfully seized, with hostile intentions; and

Whereas, Their Senators in Congress avow and maintain their treasonable acts; therefore,

Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Legislature of New York is profoundly impressed with the value of the Union, and determined to preserve it unimpaired; that it greets with joy the recent firm, dignified and patriotic Special Message of the President of the United States, and that we tender to him through the Chief Magistrate of our own State, whatever aid in men and money may be required to enable him to enforce the laws and uphold the authority of the Federal Government; and that, in the defence of the Union, which has conferred prosperity and happiness upon the American people, renewing the pledge given and redeemed by our fathers, we are ready to devote our fortunes, our lives, and our sacred honor.

Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Union-loving citizens and representatives of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Missouri, and Tennessee, who labor with devoted courage and patriotism to withhold their States from the vortex of secession, are entitled to the gratitude and admiration of the whole people.

Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Government be respectfully requested to forward, forthwith, copies of the foregoing resolutions to the President of the Nation, and the Governors of all the States of the Union.
Great stuff. If only the secessionists would have realized that their theft of federal property wouldn’t go unchallenged.
 

trice

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Great stuff. If only the secessionists would have realized that their theft of federal property wouldn’t go unchallenged.
When you get to the bottom of it, no matter what the claimed issue about secession was, the general attitude of "the South" (as in "the people who drove secession") was essentially "my way or the highway". They were willing to compromise as long as "compromise" meant they got everything they demanded first -- after that, they would "compromise" on issues that did not matter to them. Anything less was an outrageous insult that would not be tolerated.

I used to have a business partner like that. He talked of constructing "win-win" deals with customers, but that always seemed to mean we had to get everything we wanted first before we conceded anything. Once we had everything he wanted, he actually was willing to compromise -- but I believe we lost a lot of work with customers who simply didn't want to put up with the contentious negotiations.

The secessionists were like that, unwilling to "compromise" on the matters they fervently proclaimed and believing that what they perceived as "aggression" by "the North" (as in "the rest of the country") against their "institutions" was justification for all the illegal acts they saw as required to protect their "independence".

Needing to stampede other Southerners (who perhaps would have recoiled from this crazy "secession" if given the time to ponder it), they whipped up emotions with wild talk. Serious discussion of just exactly what "the North" might do and what exactly that might cost "the South" in blood, treasure and suffering were not things to be entertained. Thus the need to act in a frenzy, to avoid the slow process of the legal or political systems.
 
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unionblue

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ANTI-SECESSION RESOLUTIONS OF THE NEW YORK LEGISLATURE
Passed by the New York State Assembly, 11 January 1861
[Text located by Sean Rogers, Furman University. Transcribed by Lloyd Benson from the New York Times, 12 January 1861]


Whereas, The insurgent State of South Carolina, after seizing the Post-offices, Custom-House, moneys and fortifications of the Federal Government, has, by firing into a vessel ordered by the Government to convey troops and provisions to Fort Sumter, virtually declared war; and

Whereas, The forts and property of the United States Government in Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana have been unlawfully seized, with hostile intentions; and

Whereas, Their Senators in Congress avow and maintain their treasonable acts; therefore,

Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Legislature of New York is profoundly impressed with the value of the Union, and determined to preserve it unimpaired; that it greets with joy the recent firm, dignified and patriotic Special Message of the President of the United States, and that we tender to him through the Chief Magistrate of our own State, whatever aid in men and money may be required to enable him to enforce the laws and uphold the authority of the Federal Government; and that, in the defence of the Union, which has conferred prosperity and happiness upon the American people, renewing the pledge given and redeemed by our fathers, we are ready to devote our fortunes, our lives, and our sacred honor.

Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Union-loving citizens and representatives of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Missouri, and Tennessee, who labor with devoted courage and patriotism to withhold their States from the vortex of secession, are entitled to the gratitude and admiration of the whole people.

Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Government be respectfully requested to forward, forthwith, copies of the foregoing resolutions to the President of the Nation, and the Governors of all the States of the Union.
@trice ,

What, no demand that the ruinus tariff be reinstated? :wink:

How strange,
Unionblue
 

NedBaldwin

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....
Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That the Legislature of New York is profoundly impressed with the value of the Union, and determined to preserve it unimpaired; that it greets with joy the recent firm, dignified and patriotic Special Message of the President of the United States, and that we tender to him through the Chief Magistrate of our own State, whatever aid in men and money may be required to enable him to enforce the laws and uphold the authority of the Federal Government; and that, in the defense of the Union, which has conferred prosperity and happiness upon the American people, renewing the pledge given and redeemed by our fathers, we are ready to devote our fortunes, our lives, and our sacred honor.
...
This is early January, almost 2 months before Lincoln takes office and 3 months before Sumter is fired on...

...and here is the Legislature of NY, with a free population 10 times that of South Carolina, basically putting its hand up and saying:
'ooh ooh, Mr President, call on me ... put me in coach ... I'm all out of bubblegum."

I think its an interesting message to consider when I see it claimed that before Sumter northern states weren't ready to fight
 

trice

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This is early January, almost 2 months before Lincoln takes office and 3 months before Sumter is fired on...

...and here is the Legislature of NY, with a free population 10 times that of South Carolina, basically putting its hand up and saying:
'ooh ooh, Mr President, call on me ... put me in coach ... I'm all out of bubblegum."

I think its an interesting message to consider when I see it claimed that before Sumter northern states weren't ready to fight
Massachusetts was also getting "ready to fight" under their newly elected Governor.

I think the point to pay attention to is that in "the North" (as in "the rest of the country"), getting "ready to fight" meant talking with one State actually voting some money for preparations, maybe a little more. In "the South", getting "ready to fight" meant raising troops, seizing forts, grabbing customs houses and ships, using armed force to take bullion/cash/weapons/equipment, occupying arsenals, counterfeiting US coins, firing on a US-flagged ship, attempting to subvert the loyalty of US States, etc.

Before the attack on Ft. Sumter:
  • the Federal government had not raised a single additional man for the Army nor voted any funds to prepare for the coming war.
  • no State in "the North" had raised any long-term troops nor called up any Militia unit.
  • neither Buchanan nor Lincoln had called for any Militia or other troops from the States
  • States in "the South have been preparing for up to a year (the South Carolina legislature, for example, had voted the money to arm 10,000 men a year before secession and so the Governor had it available to spend in November of 1860).
  • the Confederate Congress of "the South" had authorized a Regular Army of 10,000 men and begun recruiting it.
  • the Confederate Congress had authorized President Davis to call upon the Confederate States for an unlimited number of one-year volunteers (shortly after that they came to their senses and passed a new law a limiting the calling power to 100,000 men)
  • the individual Confederate States had each begun organizing a long-term Army for themselves (the Army of South Carolina, the Army of Mississippi, etc.) during the "Winter of Secession". It is hard to determine how many men were actually being raised, but in early March of 1861 I would guess it looks like 50-60,000 for the first seven seceding States. South Carolina had authorized 10,000 and had something like 8,800 signed up and organizing, but that doesn't count all the units raised already, nor some Militia that was called to duty -- there are probably 10,000+ in South Carolina when Ft. Sumter is attacked.
  • President Davis had already issued 2 calls totaling about 32,000 men for 1-year Volunteers to the States before he attacked Ft. Sumter (he called for another 32,000 the day after Lincoln issued his first call for 75,000 three-month Militia)
  • the States of "the South" were able to quickly respond to Davis calls because they were already raising their own State armies. They simply sent the units they were already forming to fill the calls from Davis. This is where the troops besieging Ft. Sumter and Ft. Pickens came from, as well as other troops in Confederate service at the time.
The differences between "the North" (as in "the rest of the country") getting "ready to fight" and "the South" getting "ready to fight" are massive. Since they are both of-a-kind activity, it probably isn't right to say it is an apples-and-oranges comparison. Maybe we should use a baseball analogy: "the North" has some guys talking about maybe getting a team together and playing if they have to, while "the South" already has their team in the middle of Spring Training.
 
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