Answered my own question of what happens to battle ground stuff after battle

NH Civil War Gal

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#1
I had another book come in the mail yesterday called "Days of Uncertainty and Dread" by Gerald R. Bennett. This is about the ordeal endured by the citizens of Gettysburg right after the battle. I literally opened the package and flipped through the pages and this caught my eye:

"... The battle field was literally covered with discarded tools of war. The initial wave of visitors contained a number of curiosity seekers who were eager to pick up a souvenir of the great battle. The abandoned war material was government property and strict rules against civilians removing it were quickly and rigorously enforced. People caught in the act of taking up or in possession of arms or accouterments were summarily arrested. Their penalty was several days of assisting in the battlefield cleanup; usually with the details disposing of the several thousand dead horses still rotting on the field. The army provost troops, assisted by these reluctant "volunteers," collected nearly twenty thousand rifles and almost as many sets of accouterments."

I'm not sure all battles had this enforcement but at least this is an idea of what the provost troops did.
 

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#4
General Early detailed the Battlefield at Cedar Mountain. After observing for a while he spotted Union Soldiers picking stuff up on the Battlefield. He sent a note to General Banks the winners sweep the Battlefields. General Banks ordered his soldiers to return everything they had picked up, and placing in neat piles for recovery by the Southern Army. So it seems to be standard the winner takes the goodies.

First and only time I have seen this happen.
 

Jimklag

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#7
I had another book come in the mail yesterday called "Days of Uncertainty and Dread" by Gerald R. Bennett. This is about the ordeal endured by the citizens of Gettysburg right after the battle. I literally opened the package and flipped through the pages and this caught my eye:

"... The battle field was literally covered with discarded tools of war. The initial wave of visitors contained a number of curiosity seekers who were eager to pick up a souvenir of the great battle. The abandoned war material was government property and strict rules against civilians removing it were quickly and rigorously enforced. People caught in the act of taking up or in possession of arms or accouterments were summarily arrested. Their penalty was several days of assisting in the battlefield cleanup; usually with the details disposing of the several thousand dead horses still rotting on the field. The army provost troops, assisted by these reluctant "volunteers," collected nearly twenty thousand rifles and almost as many sets of accouterments."

I'm not sure all battles had this enforcement but at least this is an idea of what the provost troops did.
Great question and answer Tina.
 

cash

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#8
I had another book come in the mail yesterday called "Days of Uncertainty and Dread" by Gerald R. Bennett. This is about the ordeal endured by the citizens of Gettysburg right after the battle. I literally opened the package and flipped through the pages and this caught my eye:

"... The battle field was literally covered with discarded tools of war. The initial wave of visitors contained a number of curiosity seekers who were eager to pick up a souvenir of the great battle. The abandoned war material was government property and strict rules against civilians removing it were quickly and rigorously enforced. People caught in the act of taking up or in possession of arms or accouterments were summarily arrested. Their penalty was several days of assisting in the battlefield cleanup; usually with the details disposing of the several thousand dead horses still rotting on the field. The army provost troops, assisted by these reluctant "volunteers," collected nearly twenty thousand rifles and almost as many sets of accouterments."

I'm not sure all battles had this enforcement but at least this is an idea of what the provost troops did.
Most excellent! You've reached the point where you can find the answers to many of your own questions! Now your learning will increase exponentially! Congratulations, Tina!
 



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