Another attempt to locate the exact position of "A Harvest of Death".

Tom Elmore

1st Lieutenant
Member of the Year
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Jan 16, 2015
I noticed that about the trees on the map too.

If you scroll up and look at my modern photos I think you can still see discolored land where that road ran.
Just checked GoogleEarth and you are spot on, the old road does appear faintly in overhead imagery. That road would parallel the southern east-west fence, and in fact I suppose the latter fence was immediately adjacent to that road when it was built. One might even imagine that fence (dismantled) on the ground in the distance in the fuzzy 1863 image, and if that's the case, the dead located between that fence and the viewer would also likely have belonged to the 151st Pennsylvania.

I would also guess that it is just this very fence issue that led Scott Hartwig to locate the image position a bit further south, but of course he would be faced with a similar problem of a missing parallel fence in the 1863 image that should be lying closer to the Chambersburg Pike. The image facing northeast being somewhat sharper than the one facing south, his case is more difficult to make, in my view.
 
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speedylee

Corporal
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
I have a question for the collective wisdom of CWT. Watching the various videos and reading the web pages, there is the presumption that these men are Union dead. Is there anything about the cut of the uniforms or something else that indicates that to be the case? I have to admit my ignorance on the details of the clothing. The reason I ask is that I know there are plenty of photos that were once thought to be of Union dead that have since been proven to have been Confederates, leaves me wondering what is different about these fellows?
After viewing the images in this string, I looked at the famous image of the three Confederate prisoners from Gettysburg. While I realize that each Confed state was responsible for supplying uniforms for its regiments and that there were differences from state to state, the Confed uniforms in that image do not look like the uniforms of the dead in the images considered above. For that reason, sketchy as it is, I believe these are Union soldiers.

One other point on attempting to match historic images with current day topography: When building a modern street, road or highway, constructors can't just pour asphalt on the ground. There is some leveling work and the like to prepare the ground and then the material that goes beneath the asphalt has to be spread and leveled. I'm no construction guy, but that prep work is going to change the ground. I can't argue with Scott Hartwig; he's a real smart guy and he knows more than I do. Modern images of an area that include a modern road are going to have undulations in the ground where the road was built that might not have been there in previous eras. So, if Hartwig says the ground "mostly" matches the historic image, he's probably right about the location where the historic image was produced.
 

dahenry

Private
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Here is Scott Hartwig's theory (from the Blog of Gettysburg National Park, May 27, 2011):


image #1 - Library of Congress.jpg
Modern view of Image #1, looking toward the northeast.Image #2 - Looking south along eastern M...jpg


The only problem that I see are the trees north of the Chambersburg Pike, according to most maps, there weren't any trees in that location during the battle.
 

dahenry

Private
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Here is a map of the first day's action (2:30-3:00 p.m.) from the inaugural issue of Gettysburg Magazine, page 22, July 1989:
 

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dahenry

Private
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
For a complete picture of Hartwig's theory, here is the view looking in (roughly) the opposite direction, from the Blog of Gettysburg National Park:

image-21.jpg
image-2-modern.jpg
 
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