Book Review Andersonvilles of the North: The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners by James M. Gillispie

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
29,705
Location
Long Island, NY
#61
Collection; Master of Military Art and Science Theses
Title; Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, 1861-1865: a study of the Union's treatment of Confederate prisoners of war.
Author; Ivy, Jack M., Jr.

Abstract; Camp Chase, four miles southeast of Columbus, Ohio, began in May 1861 as a mustering center for units entering Union service during the American Civil War. By June 1861 it picked up additional responsibilities of housing Confederate prisoners captured by Ohio units during the earliest military actions of the war. It eventually expanded to hold 9,423 prisoners in January, 1865, which made it one of the larger Union prison camps. The earliest prisoners were afforded extraordinary leniency by state authorities until the Union government stepped in with rules and regulations. By October 1862, an effective system was in place to secure and care for prisoners. Success continued despite fluctuations in prison population, disease and a constant influx of captured wounded, until August 1864 when rations were reduced in retribution for Confederate treatment of Union captives. Ration reduction caused prisoners hardships but did not markedly increase mortality. Quality medical care and sanitation kept mortality below Union Army deaths from disease. As prison population soared during the last months of the war, increasing numbers of wounded, severely exposed and weakened captives joined Camp Chase. Reduced rations continued to pose hardships but ration reduction was offset by superb medical care and sanitation which continued to keep mortality below that experienced by the Union Army from disease. The study confirms William B. Hesseltine's study of prisons in his book, Civil War Prisons: A study in War Psychology, and examines Confederate prisoner of war mortality, comparing it to Union soldier mortality from disease. The thesis concludes that William B. Hesseltine's thesis is partially correct when applied to Camp Chase. Prisoners were well treated up to the time rations were reduced in retaliation for alleged Confederate cruelties to Union prisoners. In spite of this, Camp Chase officials continued to stress sanitation and provide clothing late in the war even though they were not obligated to do so. This demonstrated that officials at Camp Chase were successful in managing a prisoner of war camp, even during the period of Union retaliation.

Series; Command and General Staff College (CGSC) MMAS thesis
Publisher; Fort Leavenworth, KS : US Army Command and General Staff College,
Date, Original; 1990-06-01
Date, Digital; 2008
Call number; ADA 228997
Release statement; Approved for public release; Distribution is unlimited. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student-authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College or any other governmental agency. (References to these studies should include the foregoing statement.)
Repository; Combined Arms Research Library
Library; Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library
Date created; 2008-02-19
943

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
Thanks. I only read the abstract, but it looks interesting.
 

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)

USS ALASKA

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Mar 16, 2016
Messages
3,740
#62
Civil War Book Review
Summer 2009 Article 3
Published by LSU Digital Commons, 2009

Andersonvilles of the North: The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners
by Jeanne T. Heidler

Jeanne T. Heidler is Professor of History at the United States Air Force Academy. Along with David S. Heidler, she is the editor of the five-volume Encyclopedia of the American Civil War. She and David S. Heidler have recently completed a biography of Henry Clay that will be published by Random House later this year.

3 page review - https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2814&context=cwbr
1057

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
 

Attachments

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
29,705
Location
Long Island, NY
#63
Civil War Book Review
Summer 2009 Article 3
Published by LSU Digital Commons, 2009

Andersonvilles of the North: The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners
by Jeanne T. Heidler

Jeanne T. Heidler is Professor of History at the United States Air Force Academy. Along with David S. Heidler, she is the editor of the five-volume Encyclopedia of the American Civil War. She and David S. Heidler have recently completed a biography of Henry Clay that will be published by Random House later this year.

3 page review - https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2814&context=cwbr
1057

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
From the review:

Gillispie provides a welcome addition to Civil War scholarship. His understanding of how and why the myths surrounding northern policies came into being amounts to a convincing revision of existing interpretations that will be a standard source for years to come.
 

Similar threads




(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top