Ancestral Discovery

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,855
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
I recently discovered that my Great Grandfather Robert J Shurlock and Great Uncle Parkhurst Shurlock were with the 100th Pennsylvania Company D, the Roundheads. They mustered in 1861 out of Beaver PA.

View attachment 335242

View attachment 335243
Welcome! Also in the same regiment: 1st Lieutenant William C. Spurlock, Company I. He later transferred to the 51st PA, where he served as a Surgeon.

Screenshot (67).png

Screenshot (66).png

PENNSYLVANIA
100TH INFANTRY
(Three Years)

One-Hundredth Infantry.-Cols., Daniel Leasure, N. J.
Maxwell; Lieut.-Cols., James Armstrong, David A. Leckey,
Matthew M. Dawson, Joseph H. Pentecost, N. T. Maxwell, Charles
Wilson; Majs., David A: Leckey, Matthew M. Dawson, James
Armstrong, James H. Cline, T. J. Hamilton, David Critchlow, N.
J. Maxwell, James W. Bard. The 100th, known as the Round Head
regiment, was recruited in the southwestern part of the state
in Aug., 1861, and ordered to Washington on Sept. 2, where its
organization was completed add it was mustered into the U. S.
service for a three years, term. Twelve companies were
recruited but one was transferred to the 105th infantry. It
was next ordered to Fortress Monroe, where it embarked on what
proved to be an expedition to Port Royal. Here the fleet
arrived Nov. 7, and captured Forts Walker and Beauregard.
Beaufort was next occupied and the regiment remained in this
vicinity for several months, the men suffering very much from
sickness. The 100th, participated in the operations against
Charleston in June, 1862, and lost very heavily in the
engagement of June 16, near Secessionville. Returning to
Hilton Head and Beaufort in July, it was ordered to Virginia,
later being sent to Fredericksburg and attached to the 9th
corps of the Army of Northern Virginia. After various marches
during the month of August, the regiment met the enemy on the
Bull Run battlefield, where it saw hard service. After
engaging all day and losing heavily, a final charge was
ordered, from which only 198 out of 450 returned unhurt. It
was active at Chantilly and South mountain, but was held in
reserve at Antietam, owing to its crippled condition. It was
engaged at Fredericksburg and after the battle performed
important duty in covering the withdrawal of the troops, being
selected as "The most reliable skirmish regiment in the
brigade." In March, 1863, it was transferred to the
Department of the Ohio and sent to Lexington, Ky., from which
place it was ordered in June to the support of Gen. Grant at
Vicksburg. It participated in the fighting at Jackson, Miss.,
after the fall of Vicksburg, and lost many men from sickness
as well as from the enemy's fire. On its return north it was
ordered to East Tennessee though many of the men were not fit
for active service. It participated in an engagement at Blue
Springs and in the hardships of the siege of Knoxville, in
spite of which almost the entire regiment reenlisted on Jan.
1, 1864. At Annapolis, the rendezvous of the 9th corps, the
100th reported in March and became a part of the 2nd brigade,
1st division, attached to the Army of the Potomac. The 9th
corps was closely engaged at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania,
the North Anna river and Cold Harbor. Moving to Petersburg,
the 100th, was repeatedly in action, notably at the explosion
of the mine, the raid on the Weldon railroad, Poplar Spring
Church the Hatcher's run movements, and in the final assault
on Petersburg, April 2, 1865. The regiment was mustered out
at Washington on July 24, 1865.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 1​
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

nc native

Sergeant
Joined
Aug 30, 2011
Messages
592
Location
NC Piedmont
Congratulations! Ancestry and other genealogical websites are great sources for learning family history that would have taken much more time and effort in past periods. Before I started my genealogical research online several years ago, I only knew of one of my ancestors who fought in the Civil War and family lore had inflated his rank to brigadier general. (he was only a captain) Now, I have discovered
I have eight 2x and 3x great grandfathers who fought in some capacity in the Civil War and ties to several great uncles and many distant cousins (some who are famous) that fought in the Civil War.

My signature lists five of my 2x and 3x great grandfathers who fought for the Confederacy. I have two more who are not listed due to lack of space - Pvt. Nathaniel Jean - 47th North Carolina Infantry Company B and William H. Thomas - 8th N.C. Senior Reserves - Company A.
 

2rivcob73

Private
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 25, 2018
Messages
242
Location
West Warwick Rhode Island
I recently discovered that my Great Grandfather Robert J Shurlock and Great Uncle Parkhurst Shurlock were with the 100th Pennsylvania Company D, the Roundheads. They mustered in 1861 out of Beaver PA.

View attachment 335242

View attachment 335243
That is awesome! Welcome to the group, have you looked into any lineal organizations to help memorialize your ancestors service?
 

PTFreeman

Cadet
Joined
Oct 1, 2019
Messages
5
Welcome! Also in the same regiment: 1st Lieutenant William C. Spurlock, Company I. He later transferred to the 51st PA, where he served as a Surgeon.

View attachment 335265
View attachment 335266
PENNSYLVANIA
100TH INFANTRY
(Three Years)

One-Hundredth Infantry.-Cols., Daniel Leasure, N. J.
Maxwell; Lieut.-Cols., James Armstrong, David A. Leckey,
Matthew M. Dawson, Joseph H. Pentecost, N. T. Maxwell, Charles
Wilson; Majs., David A: Leckey, Matthew M. Dawson, James
Armstrong, James H. Cline, T. J. Hamilton, David Critchlow, N.
J. Maxwell, James W. Bard. The 100th, known as the Round Head
regiment, was recruited in the southwestern part of the state
in Aug., 1861, and ordered to Washington on Sept. 2, where its
organization was completed add it was mustered into the U. S.
service for a three years, term. Twelve companies were
recruited but one was transferred to the 105th infantry. It
was next ordered to Fortress Monroe, where it embarked on what
proved to be an expedition to Port Royal. Here the fleet
arrived Nov. 7, and captured Forts Walker and Beauregard.
Beaufort was next occupied and the regiment remained in this
vicinity for several months, the men suffering very much from
sickness. The 100th, participated in the operations against
Charleston in June, 1862, and lost very heavily in the
engagement of June 16, near Secessionville. Returning to
Hilton Head and Beaufort in July, it was ordered to Virginia,
later being sent to Fredericksburg and attached to the 9th
corps of the Army of Northern Virginia. After various marches
during the month of August, the regiment met the enemy on the
Bull Run battlefield, where it saw hard service. After
engaging all day and losing heavily, a final charge was
ordered, from which only 198 out of 450 returned unhurt. It
was active at Chantilly and South mountain, but was held in
reserve at Antietam, owing to its crippled condition. It was
engaged at Fredericksburg and after the battle performed
important duty in covering the withdrawal of the troops, being
selected as "The most reliable skirmish regiment in the
brigade." In March, 1863, it was transferred to the
Department of the Ohio and sent to Lexington, Ky., from which
place it was ordered in June to the support of Gen. Grant at
Vicksburg. It participated in the fighting at Jackson, Miss.,
after the fall of Vicksburg, and lost many men from sickness
as well as from the enemy's fire. On its return north it was
ordered to East Tennessee though many of the men were not fit
for active service. It participated in an engagement at Blue
Springs and in the hardships of the siege of Knoxville, in
spite of which almost the entire regiment reenlisted on Jan.
1, 1864. At Annapolis, the rendezvous of the 9th corps, the
100th reported in March and became a part of the 2nd brigade,
1st division, attached to the Army of the Potomac. The 9th
corps was closely engaged at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania,
the North Anna river and Cold Harbor. Moving to Petersburg,
the 100th, was repeatedly in action, notably at the explosion
of the mine, the raid on the Weldon railroad, Poplar Spring
Church the Hatcher's run movements, and in the final assault
on Petersburg, April 2, 1865. The regiment was mustered out
at Washington on July 24, 1865.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 1​
Thank you for all the info about the 100th. I am just beginning to gather info!!
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Messages
13,799
Location
Mississippi
I recently discovered that my Great Grandfather Robert J Shurlock and Great Uncle Parkhurst Shurlock were with the 100th Pennsylvania Company D, the Roundheads. They mustered in 1861 out of Beaver PA.
It's always exciting to find out these facts about our ancestors!

Keep us posted on what else you find.

By the way, welcome to the forums.
 

Lubliner

First Sergeant
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Messages
1,728
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Welcome from Tennessee. Ancestral Biographies always seem to prove interesting, even to the unattached, such as me. Maybe it is the close realization likened to, '...a friend of a friend of a friend...'.
Lubliner.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top