Discussion An Obit from a 1915 Confederate Veteran Magazine

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NH Civil War Gal

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I was rootling around tonight and somehow wandered into a 1915 edition of the Confederate Veteran and was reading their obits. I found this one very interesting:

He died in Nebraska so I wonder if the further you went away from the east, the easier it was for vets from both sides to mingle? I dunno know. But I thought it worthy to share and I like to think they were able to share stories and experiences because they certainly went through things no one else did.

JAMES VAN BUREN MCDONALD James Van Buren McDonald died at his home in Pierce Nebr on September 30 1915 in his eighty second year He was born in Smyth County Va in 1833 A descendant of Scotch Irish ancestry his people were among the earliest settlers of Southwestern Virginia He was married to Emeline A Gannaway in 1857 and they were the parents of a large family In 1882 he went to Nebraska with his family and resided there until his death His loyalty to his native State and the Confederacy was proved by his services in the War between the States He was lieutenant in Company E Derrick's Battalion Floyd's Brigade during his first year's service Afterwards he was in Johnson's Cavalry Brigade until Lee's surrender A beautiful mark of the esteem in which he was held by the community was shown in the pallbearers all being members of the GAR
 

NH Civil War Gal

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And here's another great one - about a woman who was often on the firing line! We've never read about these women!

Mas LUCY FRANCES CREEL CLARK Mrs Lucy Frances Creel Clark widow of Marcellus Clark died in California on March 20 1914 Funeral services were held in Parkersburg W Va where she was laid to rest beside her husband She is survived by two daughters and two grandchildren Mrs Clark was the daughter of Bushrod Creel one of the pioneer settlers of West Virginia She was born in Davisville Wood County October 16 1835 and spent her life in Parkersburg with the exception of the last two years which she spent with her daughter Mrs MB Blood in Los Angeles A loyal and true Southern woman was Mrs Clark Early in the war her husband enlisted in Company A _36th Virginia infantry which figured prominently in numerous campaigns He was made lieutenant and then captain of his company soon after his enlistment Mrs Clark accompanied him throughout the war and was always at the front at times even on the firing line She was tireless in her efforts to help and saved several fighting relatives from capture Her courage and resourcefulness in the hard days after the war never failed and she was always ready with her sympathy and support in any undertaking aiding the cause of the South She was a devout Christian and her beautiful life radiated kindness gentleness thoughtfulness of others and was an inspiration to all who knew her
 

16thVA

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And here's another great one - about a woman who was often on the firing line! We've never read about these women!

Mas LUCY FRANCES CREEL CLARK Mrs Lucy Frances Creel Clark widow of Marcellus Clark died in California on March 20 1914 Funeral services were held in Parkersburg W Va where she was laid to rest beside her husband She is survived by two daughters and two grandchildren Mrs Clark was the daughter of Bushrod Creel one of the pioneer settlers of West Virginia She was born in Davisville Wood County October 16 1835 and spent her life in Parkersburg with the exception of the last two years which she spent with her daughter Mrs MB Blood in Los Angeles A loyal and true Southern woman was Mrs Clark Early in the war her husband enlisted in Company A _36th Virginia infantry which figured prominently in numerous campaigns He was made lieutenant and then captain of his company soon after his enlistment Mrs Clark accompanied him throughout the war and was always at the front at times even on the firing line She was tireless in her efforts to help and saved several fighting relatives from capture Her courage and resourcefulness in the hard days after the war never failed and she was always ready with her sympathy and support in any undertaking aiding the cause of the South She was a devout Christian and her beautiful life radiated kindness gentleness thoughtfulness of others and was an inspiration to all who knew her


I looked on my database to see if any of Mrs. Clark's relatives had been arrested and sent to Camp Chase, and I found John C. Creel of Wood County, arrested at his home on Aug. 27, 1862, and was released on Sept. 12, 1862, though it didn't give cause or circumstances of his release. I couldn't find any Clarks from Wood County.
 
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archieclement

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I was rootling around tonight and somehow wandered into a 1915 edition of the Confederate Veteran and was reading their obits. I found this one very interesting:

He died in Nebraska so I wonder if the further you went away from the east, the easier it was for vets from both sides to mingle? I dunno know. But I thought it worthy to share and I like to think they were able to share stories and experiences because they certainly went through things no one else did.

JAMES VAN BUREN MCDONALD James Van Buren McDonald died at his home in Pierce Nebr on September 30 1915 in his eighty second year He was born in Smyth County Va in 1833 A descendant of Scotch Irish ancestry his people were among the earliest settlers of Southwestern Virginia He was married to Emeline A Gannaway in 1857 and they were the parents of a large family In 1882 he went to Nebraska with his family and resided there until his death His loyalty to his native State and the Confederacy was proved by his services in the War between the States He was lieutenant in Company E Derrick's Battalion Floyd's Brigade during his first year's service Afterwards he was in Johnson's Cavalry Brigade until Lee's surrender A beautiful mark of the esteem in which he was held by the community was shown in the pallbearers all being members of the GAR
I would think in part it is 1915.......Would hope animosities would have had faded in 50 years
 
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I was rootling around tonight and somehow wandered into a 1915 edition of the Confederate Veteran and was reading their obits. I found this one very interesting:

He died in Nebraska so I wonder if the further you went away from the east, the easier it was for vets from both sides to mingle? I dunno know. But I thought it worthy to share and I like to think they were able to share stories and experiences because they certainly went through things no one else did.

JAMES VAN BUREN MCDONALD James Van Buren McDonald died at his home in Pierce Nebr on September 30 1915 in his eighty second year He was born in Smyth County Va in 1833 A descendant of Scotch Irish ancestry his people were among the earliest settlers of Southwestern Virginia He was married to Emeline A Gannaway in 1857 and they were the parents of a large family In 1882 he went to Nebraska with his family and resided there until his death His loyalty to his native State and the Confederacy was proved by his services in the War between the States He was lieutenant in Company E Derrick's Battalion Floyd's Brigade during his first year's service Afterwards he was in Johnson's Cavalry Brigade until Lee's surrender A beautiful mark of the esteem in which he was held by the community was shown in the pallbearers all being members of the GAR
Thanks for posting, McDonald served in the 23rd Virginia Infantry Battalion, and 21st VirginiaCavalry. He was from Smith County, in S.W. Virginia and a neighbor to East Tennessee so to speak. Many former Confederates from East Tennessee and I also imagine SW Virginia left the area altogether to escape the animosity of area Unionists following the war. Most went south, a few adventured to go west. Nebraska territory furnished half a dozen or so regiments to the Union Army, but they remained out there and fought Indians. There probably would have been little or no bad feelings between McDonald and these men, especially by 1915, probably a good deal of respect, if not downright friendship.
 
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She was tireless in her efforts to help and saved several fighting relatives from capture
Also served in East Tennessee & SW. Virginia. I count 13 men with the Clark surname in this regiment! The only officer was Lieutenant Marcellus Clark of Company A. He was slightly wounded at Fort Donelson, and captured in March 1865. He was also a veteran of the Mexican War and worked for the B&O Railroad. Died in 1903.
 
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NH Civil War Gal

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Thanks for posting, McDonald served in the 23rd Virginia Infantry Battalion, and 21st VirginiaCavalry. He was from Smith County, in S.W. Virginia and a neighbor to East Tennessee so to speak. Many former Confederates from East Tennessee and I also imagine SW Virginia left the area altogether to escape the animosity of area Unionists following the war. Most went south, a few adventured to go west. Nebraska territory furnished half a dozen or so regiments to the Union Army, but they remained out there and fought Indians. There probably would have been little or no bad feelings between McDonald and these men, especially by 1915, probably a good deal of respect, if not downright friendship.
Thank you for add further information and enlightenment on this and the probable move. I had wondered why the move to Nebraska or at least out of the Virginia area.

Like I needed a new hobby but I sort have founded one reading obits in the Confederate Veteran! Does anyone know if the GAR published something similar?
 
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Thank you for add further information and enlightenment on this and the probable move. I had wondered why the move to Nebraska or at least out of the Virginia area.

Like I needed a new hobby but I sort have founded one reading obits in the Confederate Veteran! Does anyone know if the GAR published something similar?
Not sure, but I believe they must have.
 
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16thVA

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What does that mean, "she later joined the men in Monroe County?" To live or fight or what?
I'm assuming as the Union tightened control over Calhoun she went southeast to Monroe County, which was still under Confederate control, generally. From what I've found she died on Nov. 29, 1865.

I also found a letter on Family Search at the beginning of 1865, though it is only partial.

https://www.familysearch.org/photos/artifacts/45334458/amie-e-sexton-hays-letter-to-louisa-a-a-sexton-hays-15-january-1865-page-2-transcribed-by-mary-siegrist
 
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