An "African Carpet-Bagger" First Black Man Elected to Congress

Pat Young

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#1
menard.JPG


John Menard​


John Menard's parents were People of Color from Louisiana who moved to Illinois, where John was born. He completed college in Illinois. In 1865 he moved back to Louisiana. In 1868 he was elected to Congress. Democrats opposed his being seated and he was ultimately denied his seat.


Daily Constitutionalist
Thursday, Dec 31, 1868
Augusta, GA
Vol: 25
Issue: 309

menard1.JPG

Page:1
 

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Pat Young

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Raw stuff.

The reference to Sing Sing is obscure. Did New York even maintain a prison at Sing Sing in 1868?
Yes. Sing Sing opened in 1826 and was nationally known by the time of the Civil War. As New York's highest security prison, it attracted attention because the most dangerous criminals were sent "up the river."
 

DRW

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It's a nice surprise to encounter John W. Menard here. Menard moved to Jacksonville in 1871 where he first worked in post office (that traditional patronage plum) and almost certainly worked with my avatar who was JAX post master for half of 1871. He was elected to the Florida House for one term in 1874 and was appointed a justice of the peace in Duval County. He was most noted as an author, newspaper editor and commentator on politics. By the mid-1870s, Menard advised Florida's black voters against blind loyalty to the Republican Party because of the sense that state Republican leadership was taking black votes for granted.
 

Pat Young

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It's a nice surprise to encounter John W. Menard here. Menard moved to Jacksonville in 1871 where he first worked in post office (that traditional patronage plum) and almost certainly worked with my avatar who was JAX post master for half of 1871. He was elected to the Florida House for one term in 1874 and was appointed a justice of the peace in Duval County. He was most noted as an author, newspaper editor and commentator on politics. By the mid-1870s, Menard advised Florida's black voters against blind loyalty to the Republican Party because of the sense that state Republican leadership was taking black votes for granted.
Good to know.
 

Pat Young

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The Atlanta Intelligencer seems to be so mighty concerned about "the colored troops who fought nobly, and ... the colored electorate who voted often," that it presumes to speak in their name.
Uuuh-huh!
This is pretty common in the anti-black Democratic papers. They would claim to their racist readers that they were protecting the interests of the freedmen while their real intent was to mock, demean, and sow division.
 



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