Allen C. Redwood, Artist

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199thLIB

Cadet
Joined
Jan 2, 2019
Location
western North Carolina
Good morning all,

I have always been an admirer of the work of Confederate soldier Allen C. Redwood of the 55th Virginia Infantry. Is there a source where one may find all/most of his works instead of having to look through multiple publications, books, websites, etc.?

Also, he is buried near Asheville, NC (I have visited his grave in Riverside Cemetery) and I pass by a section in east Asheville called Redwood Estates, supposedly named for him.

Is there a biography on Redwood that would explain why he moved here in western North Carolina from Virginia? I have searched but never been able to find out why or where exactly he lived when he did relocate here.
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Good morning all,

I have always been an admirer of the work of Confederate soldier Allen C. Redwood of the 55th Virginia Infantry. Is there a source where one may find all/most of his works instead of having to look through multiple publications, books, websites, etc.?

Also, he is buried near Asheville, NC (I have visited his grave in Riverside Cemetery) and I pass by a section in east Asheville called Redwood Estates, supposedly named for him.

Is there a biography on Redwood that would explain why he moved here in western North Carolina from Virginia? I have searched but never been able to find out why or where exactly he lived when he did relocate here.
His brother, Henry lived in Ashville according to the article in Confederate Veteran Magazine. Allen never married. Perhaps he needed special care of some sort? As you can see, he had a very long service record. Wounded at least three times, and ended the war a P.O.W. That would probably affect his general health.

Allen Christian Redwood

Residence was not listed; a 17 year-old Student.

Enlisted on 7/24/1861 at Urbanna, VA as a Private.

On 7/24/1861 he mustered into "C" Co. VA 55th Infantry
He was transferred out on 1/12/1864

On 1/12/1864 he transferred into "C" Co. MD 1st Infantry
(date and method of discharge not given)


He was listed as:
* Wounded 6/26/1862 Mechanicsville, VA (Slightly wounded)
* Returned 7/15/1862 (place not stated) (Estimated day)
* POW 8/29/1862 2nd Manassas, VA
* Exchanged 9/21/1862 (place not stated)
* Detailed 11/15/1862 (place not stated) (Detailed w/regtl Commissary Dept)
* Returned 1/15/1863 (place not stated) (Estimated day)
* Detailed 1/20/1863 (place not stated) (Detailed as Regtl Sergt Major)
* Returned 4/15/1863 (place not stated)
* Wounded 5/2/1863 Chancellorsville, VA (Slighty wounded)
* Returned 5/15/1863 (place not stated) (Estimated day)
* Wounded 7/3/1863 Gettysburg, PA (Wounded in right elbow)
* Returned 10/15/1863 (place not stated)
* Horse shot 5/27/1864 Pollard's Farm, VA
* Detailed 9/15/1864 (place not stated) (Detailed, orderly to Maj Gnl L. Lomax)
* Detailed 10/4/1864 (place not stated) (Detailed, clerk to Lomax's adjutant)
* POW 4/7/1865 Somerton, VA
* Oath Allegiance 7/3/1865 (place not stated) (Released)


Other Information:
born 6/17/1844 in Prospect Hill Plant., Lancaste
died 12/24/1922 in Ashville, NC
Buried: Riverside Cemetery, Ashville, NC

(Parents: William Holman & Catherine Carter (Chowning)
Redwood. Postwar artist & writer, Baltimore &
N.Y..)

After the war, he lived in Port Conway, VA

- The Virginia Regimental Histories Series
- Confederate Veteran Magazine
 
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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Thank you for the reply! I was not aware that his brother lived here and that could explain the reason why he moved and died here. FYI here is an image of his grave. There is nothing indicative of his record or service. View attachment 342289
That is unusual but not uncommon in the upper south. Especially true here in East Tennessee.
 
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Saint Jude

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 15, 2018
Location
Heaven
The Book "Battles and Leaders" was originally published serially by Century Magazine. The illustration of this series was done by Redwood. It is said to be His crowning achievement.
With regard to Redwood’s illustrations, I would like to point out that his drawing “Stampede of the Eleventh Corps” shows that a perceptive artist can often convey more of the truth about a battle than a biased historian. In a recent book on the Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville, for example, James S. Pula tries to absolve the German element in the Eleventh Corps of any responsibility for the collapse of the right of Hooker’s line. He argues that the “rout” and “fllght”‘of the Eleventh Corps were an invention of the press and ridicules Redwood’s drawing because it depicts a fleeing Zouave. “There were no Zouaves in the Eleventh Corps,” he claims. The rout (yes, it really was a rout) began when von Gilsa’s brigade, which was posted at the far right of the Union line, was overrun by Stonewall Jackson and immediately took flight. (yes, there really was a flight) Of von Gilsa’s four regiments, the first to be hit was the 41st​ New York Infantry, which was made up almost entirely of Germans and was known as the DeKalb Zouaves. Between the drawing and the book, which more accurately depicts the truth?
 
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