Limited All the attention is on Forrest, but....

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
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Jan 12, 2016
Location
South Carolina
... Union Admiral David Farragut has also been removed from the Tennessee capital.

https://www.wbir.com/article/entert...useum/51-0b07979e-3273-40ee-a780-a2108de78bdf

A protest was held Saturday over a State Capitol Commission decision to move the statue of Admiral David Farragut from the capitol building in Nashville to the Tennessee State Museum.​
Demonstrators gathered near the Farragut Town Hall. They said that they wanted Farragut's bust to be placed in the Farragut Folklife Museum instead of the Tennessee State Museum. They also said they disagreed with grouping Farragut in with Nathan Bedford Forrest.​
The state commission voted to remove busts of Nathan Bedford Forrest, Admiral David Farragut and Admiral Albert Greaves from the State House Thursday. The vote came after decades of controversy around having Forrest, a former Ku Klux Klan leader and Confederate general, displayed in the capitol.​
 
... Union Admiral David Farragut has also been removed from the Tennessee capital.

https://www.wbir.com/article/entert...useum/51-0b07979e-3273-40ee-a780-a2108de78bdf

A protest was held Saturday over a State Capitol Commission decision to move the statue of Admiral David Farragut from the capitol building in Nashville to the Tennessee State Museum.​
Demonstrators gathered near the Farragut Town Hall. They said that they wanted Farragut's bust to be placed in the Farragut Folklife Museum instead of the Tennessee State Museum. They also said they disagreed with grouping Farragut in with Nathan Bedford Forrest.​
The state commission voted to remove busts of Nathan Bedford Forrest, Admiral David Farragut and Admiral Albert Greaves from the State House Thursday. The vote came after decades of controversy around having Forrest, a former Ku Klux Klan leader and Confederate general, displayed in the capitol.​
Commissioners said they voted to move the bust because it's important for people to see Tennessee's history in full context, without erasing history. By placing the busts in a museum, they said they hope people will get a better understanding of the figures' roles in Tennessee's history

Why does Farragut need to be contextualized?
 

Cycom

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 19, 2021
Location
Los Angeles, California
None are safe.

Not Confederates. Not Federals. Not former Presidents. Not missionaries.

These…people (I have more specific words in mind) and the people that support the defacement, removal, and disinterment of our dead and their legacies, either through lawlessness or “democratic” methods, are truly pathetic. No an ounce of shame in their actions.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
Some have protested Farragut's removal. The statue toppling will end when more understand Cycom's wise words above that its about our shared history.

Sadly though it is indeed fair, there's a rather basic question of if Americans can be publicly noted. Unless one wants endless squabbles over my guy or that guy by various heritage/history groups, the simplist solution if some Americans can't be noted, will be to note none.
 

jcaesar

Private
Joined
Aug 28, 2020
Sadly though it is indeed fair, there's a rather basic question of if Americans can be publicly noted. Unless one wants endless squabbles over my guy or that guy by various heritage/history groups, the simplist solution if some Americans can't be noted, will be to note none.

The pattern below is fairly locked in which has enabled the statue destruction movement from the very start.

Anti-statue forces come for Lee statue.

Southern heritage folks: Help.

Union preservation society: I am fine with this. Lee was a racist who owned slaves. Grant was an anti-racist who freed slaves. The land of traitors and alligators is getting what they deserve.

Statue falls... anti-statue forces finished with Lee's statue come for Grant.

Union preservation society: What are you doing Grant was anti-racist! Grant was anti-racist!

Anti-statue forces- He owned a slave.

Union preservation society- But, he felt really bad about it and freed he the slave.

Anti-statue forces- The southern heritage groups said the same thing about Lee. It didn't matter. He was a slave owning racist and his statues will fall.

Union preservation society- Southern heritage folks please help!

Southern heritage folks- you are on your own.
 

Pete Longstreet

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Forum Host
Silver Patron
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Mar 3, 2020
Location
Hartford, CT
A Farragut bust was next to a Forrest bust, so therefore Farragut has to go too... honestly, I'm just confused. There is absolutely no ryhme or reason for what is going on today. First it was Lee, then anything Confederate, then Lincoln, Grant, Farragut, etc, etc. I wonder what statue or busts will take the place of all that have fallen...
 

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
The pattern below is fairly locked in which has enabled the statue destruction movement from the very start.

Anti-statue forces come for Lee statue.

Southern heritage folks: Help.

Union preservation society: I am fine with this. Lee was a racist who owned slaves. Grant was an anti-racist who freed slaves. The land of traitors and alligators is getting what they deserve.

Statue falls... anti-statue forces finished with Lee's statue come for Grant.

Union preservation society: What are you doing Grant was anti-racist! Grant was anti-racist!

Anti-statue forces- He owned a slave.

Union preservation society- But, he felt really bad about it and freed he the slave.

Anti-statue forces- The southern heritage groups said the same thing about Lee. It didn't matter. He was a slave owning racist and his statues will fall.

Union preservation society- Southern heritage folks please help!

Southern heritage folks- you are on your own.
I doubt it was the "anti-statue forces" that pushed for Farragut to be removed. It was probably connected to the Forrest removal in order to appease the southern heritage crowd.
 

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
As a Tennessean who was here when the Forrest bust was installed & have lived long enough to see it removed, I can provide some perspective.

The bust was placed in the capitol as a blatant symbol of white supremacy. To them, Forrest was just a handy symbol; Kluxer, slave trader, rebel, the man was a footnote, if at all. There was no pretense of sanitized Southern Heritage at that time. Hooded Kluxers celebrated the instillation.

Forrest the brilliant light cavalry commander that CW folks admire has little or nothing to do with what present day Tennesseans think of when they hear his name or see his image. Whatever Forrest might have believed is irrelevant. He is a symbol of prejudice, violence & cruelty. It would be profoundly false to pretend otherwise.

My black friends & family members can’t stand the mention of Forrest’s name… assuming they have any reaction at all. However, Forrest the white supremacist icon is universally despised.

So, here we are in 2021, after every kind of Southern Heritage argument imaginable & contrived official review, Forrest is staring out blankly somewhere in the new TN State Museum next to Admiral Farragut, of all people. Next time I take my great granddaughter & son I will stop & take a photo… I sincerely doubt they will give it a second glance.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
I suppose the appreciation of Forrest has something to do with his adversaries...

"To those who submit to the rightful law and authority, all gentleness and forbearance; but to the petulant and persistent secessionists, why, death is mercy, and the quicker he or she is disposed of the better." -Sherman, 1863

"I have fell on a plan to stir up the people against these monsters [guerillas] and to pitch in and help us clean the country out. Blood and fire is the medicine I use. I shoot the men who are friendly with and harbour the bushwhackers and burn their houses." -General Milroy, 1865

"Burn and kill! Burn and kill!...till the whole rebel race is exterminated." -Governor Brownlow, 1866.
 

19thGeorgia

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
I suppose the appreciation of Forrest has something to do with his adversaries...

"To those who submit to the rightful law and authority, all gentleness and forbearance; but to the petulant and persistent secessionists, why, death is mercy, and the quicker he or she is disposed of the better." -Sherman, 1863

"I have fell on a plan to stir up the people against these monsters [guerillas] and to pitch in and help us clean the country out. Blood and fire is the medicine I use. I shoot the men who are friendly with and harbour the bushwhackers and burn their houses." -General Milroy, 1865

"Burn and kill! Burn and kill!...till the whole rebel race is exterminated." -Governor Brownlow, 1866.
Add Eleazer Paine to that list...

Milroy: “General Paine was in command here (Tullahoma, Tennessee) before me. He has killed some 200 men before I arrived.
He brought no charges against them, made no reports, he simply took them out and shot them. You would never know they had been killed unless you happen on their bodies out in the woods, as I do when I go out riding for exercise.”

1627332797737.png

https://emergingcivilwar.com/2011/10/17/eleazer-paine-the-man-the-myth-the-hair/
 

Rhea Cole

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
I suppose the appreciation of Forrest has something to do with his adversaries...

"To those who submit to the rightful law and authority, all gentleness and forbearance; but to the petulant and persistent secessionists, why, death is mercy, and the quicker he or she is disposed of the better." -Sherman, 1863

"I have fell on a plan to stir up the people against these monsters [guerillas] and to pitch in and help us clean the country out. Blood and fire is the medicine I use. I shoot the men who are friendly with and harbour the bushwhackers and burn their houses." -General Milroy, 1865

"Burn and kill! Burn and kill!...till the whole rebel race is exterminated." -Governor Brownlow, 1866.
You should get Dr Michael Bradley’s book ‘With Blood & Fire, Life Behind the Lines in Middle Tennessee’ on Milroy’s campaign to protect the N&CRR. He was Provost here in Murfreesboro. It was a genuine murder squad operation.

You might want to reconsider that opponent quip. Milroy soundly defeated Forrest at the Battle of the Cedars in Nov. 1864. Forrest came very close to being captured or killed. Out numbered, Milroy wisely withdrew into Fortress Rosecrans.

Score: Milroy 1 - Forrest 0.

The Battle of the Cedars is the theme of a program at Stones River NB as part of our lead up to the anniversary programs at New Years. Ed Bearss named it the Battle of the Cedars. It is also called the 3rd Battle of Murfreesboro. Forrest worshippers ignore this defeat which accounts for the misplaced reference.
 
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