Alexandria lecture highlights highest-ranking Confederate general - VA

CMWinkler

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Alexandria lecture highlights highest-ranking Confederate general
Few probably know the name of Samuel Cooper, but he was the South’s highest-ranking general, and his work for the Confederate States of America was critically important. On May 15 at 7:30 p.m., at the historic Lloyd House, in Alexandria, Va., Cooper’s great-great-granddaughter, Marion Dawson will discuss her relative’s personal life and service in the United States and Confederate armies.

For the rest: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/house-divided/wp/2014/05/12/alexandria-lecture-highlights-highest-ranking-confederate-general/
 

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M E Wolf

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Funny how he has been lost to history. His contributions went quite a ways to the field armies success.
Even more remarkable, he served as Adjutant-General for both the Union Army and Confederacy. When Virginia went to the Confederacy, he did also.

Name COOPER, Samuel
Born
June 12 1798, Hackensack NJ
Died December 3 1876, Alexandria VA
Pre-War Profession Graduated West Point 1815, Seminole War, 1852 Adjutant General
War Service March 1861 Brig. Gen. (Regular) in Confederate Army, Adjutant General and Inspector General, August 1861 General.
Post War Career Farmer
Notes At the end of the War, handed all records intact to Federal authorities.

It is also interesting that there is little notice that General Cooper turned a lot of Richmond's military papers over to Halleck, who then crated up tons of papers to which we (in a general sense), all enjoy by reading the "Official Records of the Rebellion."

M. E. Wolf
 

Pat Young

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Even more remarkable, he served as Adjutant-General for both the Union Army and Confederacy. When Virginia went to the Confederacy, he did also.

Name COOPER, Samuel
Born June 12 1798, Hackensack NJ
Died December 3 1876, Alexandria VA
Pre-War Profession Graduated West Point 1815, Seminole War, 1852 Adjutant General
War Service March 1861 Brig. Gen. (Regular) in Confederate Army, Adjutant General and Inspector General, August 1861 General.
Post War Career Farmer
Notes At the end of the War, handed all records intact to Federal authorities.

It is also interesting that there is little notice that General Cooper turned a lot of Richmond's military papers over to Halleck, who then crated up tons of papers to which we (in a general sense), all enjoy by reading the "Official Records of the Rebellion."

M. E. Wolf
I wonder if anyone in Hackensack has heard of him. A boy from the Jersey swamps was he.
 

marinegrunt

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Even more remarkable, he served as Adjutant-General for both the Union Army and Confederacy. When Virginia went to the Confederacy, he did also.

Name COOPER, Samuel
Born June 12 1798, Hackensack NJ
Died December 3 1876, Alexandria VA
Pre-War Profession Graduated West Point 1815, Seminole War, 1852 Adjutant General
War Service March 1861 Brig. Gen. (Regular) in Confederate Army, Adjutant General and Inspector General, August 1861 General.
Post War Career Farmer
Notes At the end of the War, handed all records intact to Federal authorities.

It is also interesting that there is little notice that General Cooper turned a lot of Richmond's military papers over to Halleck, who then crated up tons of papers to which we (in a general sense), all enjoy by reading the "Official Records of the Rebellion."

M. E. Wolf
Wonder if he had any family in Jersey. Anytime I read of someone who sided against his state I think of George Thomas. His family in Virginia never forgave him nor acknowledged he was alive again.
 

M E Wolf

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Where Colonel Sam Cooper lived was called "Shooter's Hill" and later called "Traitor's Hill." It was then turned into Fort Ellsworth, in Alexandria's Fortress ring. Built on the footprint of Fort Elsworth is the George Washington Masonic Temple. On the top one can look down and still, to this day see the impression of the boundary of the fort.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarens_(Alexandria,_Virginia)
Clarens or the Clarens Estate is a 19th-century Federal-style mansion in Alexandria, Virginia.[1][2] Clarens is best known as the residence of James Murray Mason (3 November 1798–28 April 1871),[3][4] a United States Representative and United States Senator from Virginia and grandson of George Mason, a Founding Father of the United States.

While it was formerly located within Fairfax County, Virginia, Clarens is presently located inside the boundaries of the independent city of Alexandria at 318 North Quaker Lane.[5][6]

[excerpt]
After the war, James Murray Mason selected Clarens as the estate at which he planned to retire.[1] On 24 September 1869, Mason officially took possession of Clarens.[1] While residing at Clarens, one of Mason's chief occupations was his correspondences.[1] Former Confederate President Jefferson Davis visited Clarens in 1870 for his final meeting with Mason and Confederate Army General Samuel Cooper.[6] Confederate Army General Robert E. Lee also visited Mason at Clarens after the war.[6] Mason died at Clarens on 28 April 1871.[1]

------------
  • Cameron ................. 12 ..... factor, importer of goods, and a resident.

  • [PDF]
    City of Alexandria Office of Historic A...
    https://www.alexandriava.gov/.../info/.../OHAOralHistorySmucker.pdf

    May 24, 2006 ... 6 Current Residence. 15. 192. 7 Changes in ... Smucker on North Quaker Lane, Alexandria, Virginia, to conduct an oral history interview. ... which was built on the site of the house of General Samuel Cooper that had been torn ...

    [ More results from www.alexandriava.gov ]
-------------------------------
http://www.civilwarreference.com/people/index.php?peopleID=298

[excerpt]




SideConfederate
StateVirginia
Born
June 12, 1798
New Hackensack, New York
DiedDecember 3, 1876
Alexandria, Virginia
BuriedChrist Church Episcopal Cemetery
Alexandria, Virginia




General Samuel Cooper, adjutant and inspector general of the Confederate army, was born at Hackensack, New Jersey, June 12, 1798. His father, of the same name, a resident of Duchess county, New York, was an officer of the revolutionary army. General Cooper entered the United States military academy at fifteen years of age, and received his commission as brevet second-lieutenant of artillery in 1815. He obtained full rank of lieutenancy in 1817, and soon after the reorganization of the army in 1821, became first-lieutenant. In 1828-36 he was aide-de-camp to General Macomb, general in chief, and in 1836 was commissioned captain of the Fourth artillery. He was on staff duty at army headquarters as assistant adjutant-general during the Florida war; was chief of staff to Colonel William J. Worth; brevetted colonel of the staff for meritorious conduct particularly relating to the prosecution of the Mexican war, and finally in 1852 became adjutant-general of the United States army. He held this rank until 1861, for a short time during this period being secretary of war ad interim. In March, 1861, he resigned his commission, and went immediately to Montgomery and tendered his services to President Davis, by whom he was the next day appointed adjutant-general of the Confederate army, of which he was the ranking officer, standing first on the list of generals. After the war he lived in retirement near Alexandria until his death December, 1876.
Confederate Military History
 

M E Wolf

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This is also a nice link:

http://www.ourarchives.wikispaces.net/Finding+Leaders

Table of Contents
From Union to Confederate Officer
Rear Adm. Raphael Semmes, ca. 1865
From Leather Merchant to President
An Irreplaceable Loss
Stuart Recommended for Promotion
Virginia Governor John Lechter, ca. 1865
Former Schoolmates Clash
General Johnston Relieved of Duties
Replacement Order Received
Johnston Restored
Resignation Letters
BG J.E. Johnston
Lt Gen. James Longstreet, ca. 1865
Maj. Gen. James E.B. Stuart, 1863
Gen. Robert E. Lee
Cdt. J.A. Alexander
Cdt. C.H.Conner
Cdt. John A. West
Cdt. Samuel C. Williams
Maj. Theophilus H. Holmes
Colonel Albert S. Johnston
Richard S. Ewell
George E. Pickett
Henry Heth
Robert B. Garnett
Robert S. Garnett
P.G.T. Beauregard
Ambrose P. Hill
Lieut. William L. Maury
Mid. Charles W. Read
Lieut. C. Manigualt Morris
Capt. Thomas M. Newell
Mid John Grimball
Lieut. J.B. Huger
Lieut. J.R. Eggleston
1st Lieut. R.F. Tattnall, U.S.M.C
Promoted by Election
Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, ca. 1863
Replacing his Replacement
Brig. Gen. Richard Delafield, ca. 1865
Gen. Pierre G.T. Beauregard
President Jefferson Davis, ca. 1865
Rewarding Jobs well done
Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, ca. 1865
Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, ca. 1865
Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, ca. 1865
Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan, ca. 1865
Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, ca. 1865
Unidentified regimental headquarter, ca. 1863
Eager to Serve
Filling in the Gaps
An experienced general retires
Lincoln’s difficult general
Friends then Foes
Robert Anderson
Abraham Lincoln
Spotty Lincoln
Patent for the Future President
Supreme Performance
Albert Sydney Johnston
Johnston Falls
Leonidas Polk
Polk’s Death
Jefferson Davis
Secretary Davis
Back on the Hill
Robert Edward Lee
Counting the Chairs
Return the Arsenal or Else
Joesph Eggleston Johnston
Highest Ranking Officer to Resign
Joseph Hooker
John Sedgwick
John Clifford Pemberton
Jubel Anderson Early
Braxton Bragg
Advising and Consenting
Lewis Addison Armistead
Ducking the Charges
Service Runs in the Family
George Gordan Meade
Irvin McDowell
Pierre G.T. Beauregard
Keeping the Mississippi Rolling
Shooting at his Teacher
Shortest Tenure on Record
William Joesph Hardee
Rifle and Infantry Tactics
Rifle and Infantry Tactics, version 2.0
Henry Wager Halleck

Edward Otho Cresap Ord
Return to top
William Tecumseh Sherman
Gold!
Richard Stoddert Ewell
George Henry Thomas
John Fulton Reynolds
Gettysburg a Skirmish?
Richard Brooke Garrett
Don Carlos Buell
Abner Doubleday
Layfayette McLaws
Earl Van Dorn
Foresst gets a Larger Command
William Starke Rosecrans
Better Illumination
Building a Better Scale
John Pope
Daniel Harvey Hill
James Longstreet
Ulysses S. Grant
Winfield Scott Hancock
Executing the Lincoln Conspirators
Simon Boliver Buckner
Thomas Jonathan Jackson

A “melancholy duty”
George Pickett
George Brinton McClellan
Edmund Kirby Smith
“Sword and services to my state”
Ambrose Powell Hill
Ambrose Everett Burnside

Burnside's Rifle
John Bell Hood
Phillip Henry Sheridan
John McAllister Schofield
Award Long Overdue
James Birdseye McPherson
James Ewell Brown Stuart
Securing His Saber
Oliver Otis Howard
Long Overdue Recognition
Integrating Freed Slaves into Society
George Washington Curtis Lee
Future Confederates
Beginning Lifelong Friendships
Capturing Mexico City and the Glory
Stacking the Deck
3rd Artillery Friendships
Filling Unexpected Vacancies
“The Regulars” in Mexico
West Point “Cottonbalers”
Longstreet and Pickett
Adjutants during the Mexican War
Mapping Mexico
Future Generals

A Tale of Two Ambroses
West Pointers in the 3rd Artillery
Jackson’s Class Standing
Counting Noses
Roommates Battle in Tennessee
Report Card
From Highest to Lowest
Choosing a Branch and a Regiment
Like Father Like Son
Class Standing
Missing the War
 


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