Alabama Iron Business, 1864

Lubliner

Captain
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
As is the usual case with the Department involving the confederacy, the lack of manpower tops the list. At that junction they were unaware of how much time was left for any operations to produce profitably. Which comes to another point of pay, and no case is shown for how these 'acquired' workmen are to be benefitted by a bankrupt account. As in most situations, all means are either waylaid or diverted to some other cause, not realizing the whole is already lost! Thanks for the thread, @DaveBrt.
Lubliner.
 

DaveBrt

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Location
Charlotte, NC
As is the usual case with the Department involving the confederacy, the lack of manpower tops the list. At that junction they were unaware of how much time was left for any operations to produce profitably. Which comes to another point of pay, and no case is shown for how these 'acquired' workmen are to be benefitted by a bankrupt account. As in most situations, all means are either waylaid or diverted to some other cause, not realizing the whole is already lost! Thanks for the thread, @DaveBrt.
Lubliner.
To my knowledge, the only foreign workers imported were engravers to make bank notes and bonds. These men demanded pay in gold, monthly, and exemption from all military service. The government had trouble living up to both demands. I'm sure it would have been the same if hundreds of iron workers had been imported.
 

Lubliner

Captain
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
As is the usual case with the Department involving the confederacy, the lack of manpower tops the list. At that junction they were unaware of how much time was left for any operations to produce profitably. Which comes to another point of pay, and no case is shown for how these 'acquired' workmen are to be benefitted by a bankrupt account. As in most situations, all means are either waylaid or diverted to some other cause, not realizing the whole is already lost! Thanks for the thread, @DaveBrt.

To my knowledge, the only foreign workers imported were engravers to make bank notes and bonds. These men demanded pay in gold, monthly, and exemption from all military service. The government had trouble living up to both demands. I'm sure it would have been the same if hundreds of iron workers had been imported.
I can hardly imagine trying to run the blockade with a cargo of Irish or hired immigrants. I wonder how the Union Navy would react with a confiscation of skilled laborers such as that; give them a better deal, or send them home empty?
Lubliner.
 

USS ALASKA

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 16, 2016
Wow - the language usage in that document. "We would not go among them to find criminals nor law-breakers." Lyrical? Is that the word I'm looking for?

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
 

USS ALASKA

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 16, 2016
I wonder how the Union Navy would react with a confiscation of skilled laborers such as that; give them a better deal, or send them home empty?
Lubliner.
Mostly likely one or two weeks of 'hospitality' in the most fashionable of detention centers then back home with other foreign captains and crewmembers of captured runners. That is an interesting question...how DID they get back home? Who took them, where did they disembark, who paid for this...? I hate this place...more work now...dang...

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
 

Story

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Location
SE PA
I lost mental track of the number of entries on Confederate files in FOLD3, where they were pleading that their mechanical skills would better serve the Confederacy in manufacturing that lugging a musket around.
 

Lubliner

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Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
@USS ALASKA they have just won a free ticket home, courtesy of the Federal Government!:D
But I believe it possible if some had a valid occupation and could serve the war effort the Union would absorb them.
Lubliner.
 
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