Adams Express office

Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
7,862
Location
Pipestem,WV
#1
02124v.jpg


Chattanooga, Tennessee. Adams Express office, the Crutchfield house with Cameron Hill in the distance.
CREATED/PUBLISHED
[1864]
NOTES
Caption from negative sleeve: Adams Express Office (Chattanooga, Tenn.).
The Crutchfield House, Cameron Hillin distance, Chattanooga, Tenn.
Two plates form left (LC-B811-2658A) and right (LC-B811-2658B) halves of a stereograph pair.
Corresponding print is in LOT 4165-F.
Forms part of Civil War glass negative collection (Library of Congress).
 

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Joined
Oct 22, 2012
Messages
7,746
#10
I wonder if the big building in the back is a train shop, some kind of manufacturing building or row homes....​
it may be the back side of the Cruchfield house.

http://www.americanroads.net/ReedHouse.html
tmh10, Today at 1:56 AM
#6
Definitely the Crutchfield House. A very impressive structure for that time and place. I'm counting 14 chimneys, extra wide. Probably three flues each servicing fireplaces on each of three floors. And shutters on all of the windows - not a manufacturing facility, but a place where people sleep. The horse looks hitched backwards, head at the wagon. Was he being fed? Great picture!
 

Story

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Messages
1,436
Location
SE PA
#11
This seems to be the only pre-existing thread that's close enough to add to.

Brick building at Fourth and Market was among city's earliest stores, then was Civil War prison and later a seat of government
A three-story brick building at the southwest corner of Market Street at Fourth was another of the business interests of Samuel and George Williams.
According to the Williams lawsuit that was found last year in an old building, it was built for them by Thomas Crutchfield, a master brickmason who arrived in Chattanooga at an early date. He also built a fine two-story home for Col. James A. Whiteside on Poplar Street. However, Crutchfield himself curiously lived in a collection of log - not brick - buildings at Ninth Street that were known as "The Cabins." His sons, William and Tom Crutchfield,joined with him in erecting the Crutchfield House hotel that was nearby across from the Union Station. William Crutchfield was a member of Congress and a "water witch" who famously challenged Confederate leader Jefferson Davis at the family hotel. A later descendant, Ward Crutchfield, was a prominent politician.


Photo of building at URL
https://www.chattanoogan.com/2019/3/13/384050/Brick-Store-That-Later-Served-As-Civil.aspx
 

uaskme

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Messages
1,813
#13
Definitely the Crutchfield House. A very impressive structure for that time and place. I'm counting 14 chimneys, extra wide. Probably three flues each servicing fireplaces on each of three floors. And shutters on all of the windows - not a manufacturing facility, but a place where people sleep. The horse looks hitched backwards, head at the wagon. Was he being fed? Great picture!
It is the Crutchfield House. Same place where Mr. Crutchfield threatened to kill Jeff Davis when he stayed there. Davis did a whirlwind tour of the South pre War. Needless to say,Tom Crutchfield was a Unionist.

Picture must be Early 64. Federals have enough support in town that they eventually rebuild the Railroad. By the time they get to Atlanta, Confederates are ripping up the rails. It just saves the Federals time. They are replacing them anyway. They map the bridges. Know the measurement and such. Prefabricate the timbers. Ship them South, and rebuild the bridges. Have a garrison 10k Troops and who knows how many Pioneers? Have never heard the number. Nashville was 120 miles or so North. Endless supply of Mechanics and material there.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 26, 2019
Messages
94
#15
Thanks for posting the photo. I had forgotten the original height of Cameron Hill. It's more like a molehill now. All those fine homes and history gone long ago. The Crutchfield House was once renowned as one of the finest hotels in the South. It was used as a headquarters and also a Union hospital during the Civil War. It burned to the ground in 1867 and the famous Read House was built on the site several years later. One of Ward Crutchfield's daughters "Missy" lived on my street several years ago.
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2019
Messages
94
#16
This seems to be the only pre-existing thread that's close enough to add to.

Brick building at Fourth and Market was among city's earliest stores, then was Civil War prison and later a seat of government
A three-story brick building at the southwest corner of Market Street at Fourth was another of the business interests of Samuel and George Williams.
According to the Williams lawsuit that was found last year in an old building, it was built for them by Thomas Crutchfield, a master brickmason who arrived in Chattanooga at an early date. He also built a fine two-story home for Col. James A. Whiteside on Poplar Street. However, Crutchfield himself curiously lived in a collection of log - not brick - buildings at Ninth Street that were known as "The Cabins." His sons, William and Tom Crutchfield,joined with him in erecting the Crutchfield House hotel that was nearby across from the Union Station. William Crutchfield was a member of Congress and a "water witch" who famously challenged Confederate leader Jefferson Davis at the family hotel. A later descendant, Ward Crutchfield, was a prominent politician.


Photo of building at URL
https://www.chattanoogan.com/2019/3/13/384050/Brick-Store-That-Later-Served-As-Civil.aspx
I think this was the same jail that several of the Andrew's Raiders were housed before being moved to the privately owned Swain Jail on Lookout St. One of Ward Crutchfield's daughters "Missy" lived on my street several years ago.
 



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