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USS ALASKA

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An interesting addition to 'Memoirs of John A. Dahlgren, Rear Admiral, United States Navy' by Madeline Vinton Dahlgren...

Syracuse University
SURFACE
The Courier Libraries
Spring 1990

Intentional Omissions from the Published Civil War Diaries of Admiral John A. Dahlgren
by Robert J. Schneller Jr.

Part of the American Studies Commons, and the Military History Commons
This Article is brought to you for free and open access by the Libraries at SURFACE. It has been accepted for inclusion in The Courier by an authorized administrator of SURFACE. For more information, please contact surface@syr.edu.

Madeleine Dahlgren wrote Memoir of John A. Dahlgren with an eye to heighten her husband's reputation. It was not an easy job, for
Dahlgren was unpopular. He faced great difficulties as commander of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, not the least of which was Gillmore's accusatory book. His comrades entertained serious doubts about his ability to lead, and their doubts were not unfounded, as his own Civil War diaries give evidence. With her motives for writ, ing Memoir, it is not surprising that Madeleine Dahlgren eliminated some of that evidence. In general, the omitted passages deal with aspects of command-honor, social finesse, judgment about subordinates, the ability to redress grievances satisfactorily, and the maintenance of good morale. Although her deletions modify the final portrayal in Memoir, they do not entirely render it false. The Dahlgren that emerges from chapters 14 through 16 is not fundamentally different from the Dahlgren of the corresponding diaries. The editing merely softened the blow that he had already inflicted upon himself by his own words. Madeleine Dahlgren did not repaint her husband's portrait for posterity, but she did touch it up.


https://surface.syr.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1242&context=libassoc

File too large to attach - please see above link.
1297

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USS ALASKA

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Louisiana State University
LSU Digital Commons
LSU Historical Dissertations and Theses Graduate School
1999

Another New South: Patterns of Continuity in the Southern Naval Stores Industry.
by Robert Boone Outland III

Louisiana State University and Agricultural & Mechanical College
This Dissertation is brought to you for free and open access by the Graduate School at LSU Digital Commons. It has been accepted for inclusion in LSU Historical Dissertations and Theses by an authorized administrator of LSU Digital Commons. For more information, please contact gradetd@lsu.edu.

Abstract
Analysis of southern naval stores production, an industry in many respects more representative of southern economic development than cotton textiles, reveals a pattern of continuity between the antebellum and post-war South. Naval stores manufacturing began in the
colonial era but languished as a marginally-profitable business until the 1830s when new uses for spirits of turpentine resulted in increased demand and higher prices. Large turpentine operations developed almost exclusively in eastern North Carolina and the slaves, who performed most of the work, experienced distinct work patterns. By the 1850s, destructive gum-harvesting methods led to the depletion of North Carolina’s longleaf pine forests; producers determined to continue in the business moved their operations and slaves into fresh pine tracts in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama.


The antebellum industry’s trends—large-scale production, primitive harvesting methods that wounded the trees, and reliance on forced labor—continued after the Civil War. Producers continued moving into the deep South and solved the problem of labor shortages with convict leasing and peonage. Intensive work routines and difficult conditions in isolated forest camps also persisted, despite attacks on the industry’s labor practices in the early twentieth century. Moreover, producers continued to migrate through the South as gum collection devastated pine stands. Progressive-era initiatives did bring moderately successful efforts to introduce less destructive harvesting methods than those in use since the 1700s. However, two new problems plagued the industry in the first half of the century: the rapid rise of production costs and competition from both foreign gum naval stores producers and the rapidly growing wood naval stores industry. These rivals, combined with the economic and social changes that affected the South in the 1930s and 1940s, brought the gum naval stores industry to virtual collapse, despite federal assistance through New Deal farm programs. The wood naval stores industry, which relied on heavy mechanization and a small number of well-trained technicians, made gains at the expense of the gum industry. That naval stores production did not modernize until World War II, demonstrates that a significant portion of post-Civil War southern development represented a continuation of antebellum patterns.

https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=8116&context=gradschool_disstheses

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1395

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Bruce Vail

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The Confederacy was Green and the forerunner of the Earth Liberation Front (ELF) or practicing Ecotage before it was cool...just kidding... :wink:

Bridgewater State University
Virtual Commons - Bridgewater State University
Honors Program Theses and Projects Undergraduate Honors Program
5-9-2017

A Compact with the Whales: Confederate Commerce Raiders and New Bedford’s Whaling Industry 1861-1865
by Mark Mello

This item is available as part of Virtual Commons, the open-access institutional repository of Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, Massachusetts.

Many historians argue that the American Civil War was one of the leading causes of the decline of the American whaling industry, and perhaps the most destructive forces were Confederate commerce raiders. These did more to inflict damage upon this industry than any
other occurrence during the war. A case study focusing on the city of New Bedford is the clearest and most sensible way to illustrate this. Since New Bedford was the hub of whaling industry and the home of well over half of the whaling fleet, this city best represents the effectiveness of the commerce raiders on the industry as a whole. The CSS Sumter, CSS Alabama, and the CSS Shenandoah single-handedly did the most to lead the whaling industry into its dying days.


https://vc.bridgew.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1226&context=honors_proj

...and the whole oil revolution may have had something to do with it also...
672

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I visited the New Bedford whaling museum a couple of years back and really enjoyed it. I'm printing out this paper to study it closely...
 

USS ALASKA

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ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HAZARD SURVEY
CPRA EMERGENCY RESTORATION PROJECT
BAYOU BONFOUCA MARSH CREATION (PO-104)

ST. TAMMANY PARISH, LOUISIANA
Prepared For:Coastal Protection & Restoration Authority
Baton Rouge Office

Prepared By: C&C Technologies, Inc. Lafayette, LA August 2014 C&C Project No. 140619
Sean P. Comiskey Marine Geologist
Robert Westrick Senior Marine Archaeologist

The Coastal Protection & Restoration Authority (CPRA) contracted C & C Technologies, Inc. (C&C) to perform an Archaeological and Hazard Survey within the Bayou Bonfouca project area. This report assesses the geohazards and shallow subsurface seismic stratigraphy for future soil boring and dredging-related activities within the survey area. An Archaeological Assessment of the project area is provided in Section 2.0. The scope of the project and area of interest were specified by the CPRA.1.1.1 The purpose of the survey is to identify potential geological and man-made hazards, constraints to dredging related activities, locate any potential cultural resources, and determine the general seafloor and subbottom conditions within the survey area. Geological hazards within the survey area may include, but are not limited to features such as dredge spoils, mottled seafloor, and buried gas saturated zones. Potential man-made hazards may include archaeological resources, pipeline infrastructure, wells, and extraneous debris associated with oil and gas lease development and maritime activities. The survey fieldwork and reporting comply with the standards required by the CPRA.

ftp://ftp.coastal.la.gov/PO-104/Survey%20Report/2014/Expanded%20Borrow%20Area%20Report/Prelim_Arch_Hazard-140619.pdf

Pages 21-24 deal with Civil War era vessels.
1469

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East Texas Historical Journal
Volume 3 | Issue 1 Article 7
3-1965

Leon Smith: Confederate Mariner
by James M. Day

Part of the United States History Commons
This Article is brought to you for free and open access by SFA ScholarWorks. It has been accepted for inclusion in East Texas Historical Journal by an authorized administrator of SFA ScholarWorks. For more information, please contact cdsscholarworks@sfasu.edu.

"Gallant," "bold," "daring," "brave," these are adjectives used by the comrades-in-arms of Leon Smith in describing the man and his activities for the Confederate States Navy along the Gulf coast of Texas. To his opponents, Smith was something else again - "unscrupulous" "villain" "pirate", and "scoundrel," but even then his foes had to admit that he was a "man of enormous energy and capacity." By their own admission, then, it must have been so.

https://scholarworks.sfasu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1063&context=ethj
1584

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Belfoured

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Collection; Master of Military Art and Science Theses
Title; Adaptation of the vessels of the Western Gunboat Flotilla to the circumstances of riverine warfare during the American Civil War.
Author; Budd, Nicholas F.

Abstract; This study investigates the adaptation and purpose-built construction of the vessels used by the Federal government to conduct riverine warfare on the waters of the American Mississippi River drainage basin. The study concentrates on the technology, geography, hydrography, and convention which shaped the construction of the vessels comprising the Federal Western Gunboat Flotilla; an organization which after October 1862 became the United States Navy Mississippi Squadron. The ability of an organization to adapt its equipment to conditions encountered during wartime is often a contributing factor in ultimate victory or defeat. During the Civil War, the process adopted by the Navy to adapt and furnish vessels for its riverine force was flawed. This study emphasizes these facts and explores the response of the Navy chain of command to lessons learned in combat about the vulnerabilities of the vessels of the Western Gunboat Flotilla. The study is not intended as a treatise on tactics or the organization of the United States Navy. However, it does address both with regard to their effect on the performance and adaptation of the vessels of the Western Gunboat Flotilla.

Series; Command and General Staff College (CGSC) MMAS thesis
Publisher; Fort Leavenworth, KS : US Army Command and General Staff College,
Date; Original 1997-06-06
Date; Digital 2007
Call number; ADA 331530
Release statement; Approved for public release; Distribution is unlimited. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student-authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College or any other governmental agency. (References to these studies should include the foregoing statement.)
Repository; Combined Arms Research Library
Library; Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library
Date created; 2007-04-20
387

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More great info. Thanks.
 

rebelatsea

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Kent ,England.
From a post provided by @67th Tigers ... https://civilwartalk.com/threads/laird-rams-and-the-css-stonewall.113327/page-4#post-1470091

The Laird Rams: Warships in Transition 1862-1885

Submitted by Andrew Ramsey English, to the University of Exeter as a thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Maritime History, April 2016.

Please see this link... https://ore.exeter.ac.uk/repository/bitstream/handle/10871/24286/EnglishA.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

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USS ALASKA
This is a nicely written paper which accurately the describes the two vessels as equipped for RN service. It is a shame it omits any explanation of how they came to be and the evolution of the design to what we now recognise as "the Laird Rams".
 

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