ACW Naval papers

USS ALASKA

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#1
Collection; Master of Military Art and Science Theses
Title;
Analysis of the relationship between technology and strategy and how they shaped the Confederate States Navy.
Author;
Brown, Wesley A.

Abstract; This
study investigates the use of technology by the Confederate States of America to develop naval strategy and ultimately the Navy during the American Civil War. The study concentrates on the building and use of: ironclads to break the blockade and coastal defense, torpedoes (mines) for coastal defense, and Submarines to help break the blockade at Charleston. The use of technology had a significant influence on the Confederate Navy not only on the strategic, but also on the operational and the tactical levels of war. Operational campaigns were planned and executed around the presence or absence of confederate ironclads by both the North and the South. Battles were won, lost, or never fought due to the presence of confederate torpedoes laid in Southern harbors. The threat of Confederate submarines caused Union blockading squadrons to reduce the capabilities of catching runners by moving the fleet out of the submarines tactical range. Today's Navy, in its quest for new technology, faces a similar situation as the Confederate Navy did in 1861. The Navy must seek new technology to enhance warfighting skills and not simply look for the "ultimate weapon" as the Confederate Navy first thought of the ironclad.

Series; Command and General Staff College (CGSC) MMAS thesis
Publisher;
Fort Leavenworth, KS : U.S. Army Command and General Staff College,
Date; Original
1999-06-04
Date; Digital
1999-06-04
Call; number ADA 367701
Release statement; Approved for public release; Distribution is unlimited. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student-authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College or any other governmental agency. (References to these studies should include the foregoing statement.)
Repository; Combined Arms Research Library
Library; Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library
Date created;
2006-08-24

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USS ALASKA

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#3
Collection; Master of Military Art and Science Theses
Title;
Admiral David Glasgow Farragut: a study of the criteria used to select the Commander of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron.
Author;
Ritchie, Steven C.

Abstract; This
study examines the life and career of Admiral David G. Farragut. Specifically, this paper addresses the primary question: Why was Farragut chosen to command the West Gulf Blockading Squadron? This study seeks to establish the criteria used in Farragut’s selection. This thesis breaks down the criteria into three areas. First, the study examines significant events in Farragut’s career leading up to his selection. Second, this study analyzes Farragut’s loyalty to the Union and its effect on his selection. Last, Farragut’s political and family connections are examined to determine their effect on his selection. Research shows that career performance and seniority, loyalty to country, and political connections were all factors in Farragut’s appointment to command. By analyzing these factors and the selection process, this study contributes to the knowledge and understanding of how commanders were appointed during the Civil War.

Series; Command and General Staff College (CGSC) MMAS thesis
Publisher;
Fort Leavenworth, KS : U.S. Army Command and General Staff College,
Date; Original
1999-06-04
Date; Digital
1999-06-04
Call number; ADA 367620
Release statement; Approved for public release; Distribution is unlimited. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student-authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College or any other governmental agency. (References to these studies should include the foregoing statement.)
Repository; Combined Arms Research Library
Library; Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library
Date created;
2006-09-14
45

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#4
This looks very familiar, but I can't find a copy in my files, so I must assume I haven't read it .
Now I am looking forward to jumping in!
I got into it today. There is some interesting stuff here, but unfortunately, the chapter "Submarine Warfare" is wrought with inaccuracies. Not the author's fault. There is more up-to-date material out now.
 

DaveBrt

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#5
I got into it today. There is some interesting stuff here, but unfortunately, the chapter "Submarine Warfare" is wrought with inaccuracies. Not the author's fault. There is more up-to-date material out now.
I have found that true of a lot of these papers from the 90's. Since most do no original research, they are relying on material published in the early 90's or before -- ie 25+ years old. The digitizing of the National Archives and numerous university special collections, and placing them on the web, has brought out a tremendous amount of material that the MA student would never have had time to find "in the old days."
 

rebelatsea

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#6
I have found that true of a lot of these papers from the 90's. Since most do no original research, they are relying on material published in the early 90's or before -- ie 25+ years old. The digitizing of the National Archives and numerous university special collections, and placing them on the web, has brought out a tremendous amount of material that the MA student would never have had time to find "in the old days."
How true that is as I have found out to my cost, and sometimes embarrassment !
 

USS ALASKA

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#8
Collection; Master of Military Art and Science Theses
Title; How the success of the CSS Hunley inspired the development of the United States naval submarine force.
Author; Petty, Jesse P.
Branch/Country; United States Navy

Abstract; The entire nation took notice the moment the news broke of the CSS Hunley's historic sinking of the slope of war Housatonic. More to the point, the hearts and minds of inventors and engineers the world over were captured, and an era of development and innovation had begun. The evening of February17, 1864, shaped the naval policies and government viewpoints regarding submarine warfare over the course of the next three decades. Extraordinary individuals such as Simon Lake, John Holland, and Thorsten Nordenfeldt were inspired by the events of the American Civil War and developed some of the most technologically advanced machines of the time. These innovators, along with many others, sought to motivate the naval powers of the time to implement this new and unique form of warfare. However, misguided engineers and tragic accidents led to skepticism and delays to innovation. Undaunted, these engineers continued to gain momentum and notoriety for their designs, resulting in the United States Naval Department commissioning the nation's first submarine, the USS Holland.

Series; Command and General Staff College (CGSC) MMAS thesis
Focus Program; Military History
Publisher; Fort Leavenworth, KS : US Army Command and General Staff College
Date; Original 2017-06-09
Date; Digital 2017-06-09
Release statement; Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student-authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College or any other governmental agency. (References to these studies should include the foregoing statement.)
Repository; Combined Arms Research Library
Library; Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library
Date created; 2017-07-25
125

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USS ALASKA

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#9
Naval War College Review
Volume 54
Number 1Winter Article 8
2001
The Confederate Naval Buildup
David G. Surdam

This Article is brought to you for free and open access by the Journals at U.S. Naval War College Digital Commons. It has been accepted for inclusion in Naval War College Review by an authorized editor of U.S. Naval War College Digital Commons. For more information, please contact repository.inquiries@usnwc.edu.

The Union navy’s control of the American waters was a decisive element in the outcome of the Civil War. The Federal government’s naval superiority allowed it to project power along thousands of miles of coastline and rivers, subsist large armies in Virginia, and slowly strangle the southern economy by stymieing imports of European and northern manufactures and foodstuffs, as well as of exports of southern staples, primarily raw cotton.

The infant Confederate government quickly established a naval organization. Jefferson Davis chose Stephen Mallory as Secretary of the Navy. Mr. Mallory confronted an unenviable task. The seceding states possessed no vessels capable of fighting against the best frigates in the Federal navy, nor did those states possess most of the necessary raw materials and industries needed to build modern warships.

Despite the Confederacy’s handicaps in creating a navy, its embryonic fleet came tantalizingly close to upsetting the Federal navy’s superiority in March and April of 1862. The Confederate ironclad Virginia temporarily terrorized a formidable Union fleet in Hampton Roads during March. The Virginia’s success panicked some of Lincoln’s cabinet members; fortunately for the North, the USS Monitor arrived before the Virginia could wreak further havoc upon the fleet. The Monitor neutralized the Virginia, and the Federal fleet in the Chesapeake was never again seriously challenged. A month later, despite fears that the Confederates would have three ironclads waiting for then-Captain David Farragut’s fleet, the Federal fleet captured New Orleans before the two largest Confederate ironclads became fully operational. Had the two large ironclads, the Louisiana and the Mississippi, been ready, the attack on New Orleans might have had a different ending. Even the Arkansas, an uncompleted warship, created consternation in two Union fleets on the Mississippi in mid-1862. Thereafter, Confederate naval efforts would continue to be insufficient and too late.

Could the Confederate government have fielded an even stronger navy, a navy strong enough to at least break the blockade? Did the Confederate navy make the best use of its time and resources? What were the important issues facing Mallory and the Confederacy in creating their navy? Did Mallory and the Confederate government make decisions that retarded the buildup of the Confederate navy?

https://digital-commons.usnwc.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2394&context=nwc-review
157

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#11
Collection; Master of Military Art and Science Theses
Title; Effect of new technology on the operational and strategic levels of war: the development of steam propulsion in the United States Navy prior to 1860.
Author; Gray, Robert P.


Abstract; This study uses the development of steam propulsion in the United States Navy as a case study for how new technology affects the strategy of the United States at the operational and strategic levels. Using the modern paradigms of operational and strategic levels of war as delineated in current joint publications, this study shows that the link between technology and strategic and operations design is critical to the application of new technology. Though the period of the study is before the Civil War, significant use of steam propulsion in the United States allows detailed analysis of the application of technology without the influence of other nations. This study shows that, during this period, there is a significant strategic effect of steam technology, whereas steam technology's effect on the operational level of war is difficult to conceptualize. The study shows that certain patterns that relate to steam's application can be applied to modern technological advancement.

Series; Command and General Staff College (CGSC) MMAS thesis
Publisher; Fort Leavenworth, KS : US Army Command and General Staff College
Date; Original 1993-06-03
Date; Digital 2007
Call number; ADA273954
Release statement; Approved for public release; Distribution is unlimited. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student-authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College or any other governmental agency. (References to these studies should include the foregoing statement.)
Repository; Combined Arms Research Library
Library; Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library
Date created; 2007-11-07

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#13
Finnish Sailors and Soldiers in the American Civil War
by Mika Roinila

The involvement of Finns in the American Civil War (1861–1865) has received very little attention. The American Civil War, as we know, was the result of disagreements involving the issue of slavery between the northern and southern states of the Union. While the South favoured slavery, the North was against it. Literature which deals with the involvement of Finnish soldiers and sailors is limited to one major contribution (Ilmonen, 1919). In his book on Finnish-American history, a number of individuals -- particularly sailors -- are noted, who fought on the side of the Northern Union. In this brief article, I present some findings of individuals who participated on both sides
of the Civil War. A list of soldiers and sailors is also presented from data collected from Ilmonen (1919), from archival sources obtained from the U.S. National Archives in Washington DC as well as from the Sailor’s Snug Harbour facility which was the home for many retired Finnish sailors following the Civil War.


http://www.migrationinstitute.fi/fi...rs_and_soldiers_in_the_american_civil_war.pdf
233

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#14
Collection; Master of Military Art and Science Theses
Title; Union and Confederate secretaries of the Navy: a comparative study of the secretaries during the Civil War.
Author; Smith, Royce L.

Abstract; This study investigates why Secretaries Gideon Welles and Stephen Mallory were able to remain in office for the entire span of the Civil War, while most of their contemporaries did not last their full term. The study explores Secretaries Mallory's and Welles' approach to their jobs and their Departmental policies that contributed to their success and failures. Naval warfare played a key role during the Civil War, for without the efforts of the Navy Secretaries, the war's outcome could have been significantly different. This study explores their backgrounds, actions taken during the war, and personal relationships between them and others within the administration. This study explains that the longevity of Mallory and Welles can be attributed to their departmental policy decisions and by roles and played within the administration of their respective Presidents. Both Secretaries demonstrated high levels of initiative and effectiveness with their administrative methods, departmental policies, and approach to naval warfare. It was these strengths that significantly contributed to their longevity.

Series; Command and General Staff College (CGSC) MMAS thesis
Publisher; Fort Leavenworth, KS : US Army Command and General Staff College,
Date; Original 1995-06-02
Date; Digital 2007
Call number; ADA 299859
Release statement; Approved for public release; Distribution is unlimited. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student-authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College or any other governmental agency. (References to these studies should include the foregoing statement.)
Repository; Combined Arms Research Library
Library; Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library
Date created; 2007-06-27
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#15
Accession Number : ADA395177
Title : Naval Strategy During the American Civil War
Corporate Author : AIR WAR COLL MAXWELL AFB AL
Personal Author(s) : Murphy, David J
Report Date : Apr 1999

Abstract : The objective of the research project is to examine how the Union and Confederate naval strategies and new naval technologies affected the conduct of the American Civil War. With regard to the Union Navy's strategy, the effectiveness of the blockade, Western River Campaign, and amphibious operations were examined. Discussions on the Union blockade also touch on the effectiveness on Confederate blockade runners. The Confederate strategies of using privateers and commerce raiders are examined. Confederate coastal and river defenses are examined within the context of new technology, specifically with respect to ironclad ships and the use of mines, torpedoes, and submarines.

Subject Categories : Humanities and History
Military Forces and Organizations
Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics
Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
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#16
Colonel Murphy might have done more with this subject. The US progressed rapidly from the broad brush strokes of General Scott's plan of blockade and river control, to a plan that utilized coastal information, census information, and informal intelligence, to control the potential river cities of the Confederacy, and its best potential port: Baltimore.
From that starting point they instituted a plan to control costs, and to capture and destroy Confederate Naval assets, especially in the Gulf of Mexico. The navy kept tabs on developments at Norfolk, and missed by just a day having an effective ironclad response to the Virginia.
Lincoln supported these naval efforts, including getting the mortar scows to both the outlets of the Mississippi and to the contested part of the middle Mississippi.
For a country lawyer with no naval background, supporting 3 early effective naval operations was impressive.
But of course the naval plan was constructed by professionals and implemented by professionals.
A close analysis of the New Orleans operation would inform us of a operational plan and a tactical daring that the army would eventually copy at Vicksburg.
 
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#17
How could the US navy, with its limited patrol resources locate and sink the Alabama? The British had a world wide naval intelligence system at that time and they would have known of the Alabama's captures and location. If there were a few hints and suggestions passed along to US officers, its not the kind of thing that would appear in a log or a letter. :bounce:
 

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#18
Collection; Master of Military Art and Science Theses
Title; Adaptation of the vessels of the Western Gunboat Flotilla to the circumstances of riverine warfare during the American Civil War.
Author; Budd, Nicholas F.

Abstract; This study investigates the adaptation and purpose-built construction of the vessels used by the Federal government to conduct riverine warfare on the waters of the American Mississippi River drainage basin. The study concentrates on the technology, geography, hydrography, and convention which shaped the construction of the vessels comprising the Federal Western Gunboat Flotilla; an organization which after October 1862 became the United States Navy Mississippi Squadron. The ability of an organization to adapt its equipment to conditions encountered during wartime is often a contributing factor in ultimate victory or defeat. During the Civil War, the process adopted by the Navy to adapt and furnish vessels for its riverine force was flawed. This study emphasizes these facts and explores the response of the Navy chain of command to lessons learned in combat about the vulnerabilities of the vessels of the Western Gunboat Flotilla. The study is not intended as a treatise on tactics or the organization of the United States Navy. However, it does address both with regard to their effect on the performance and adaptation of the vessels of the Western Gunboat Flotilla.

Series; Command and General Staff College (CGSC) MMAS thesis
Publisher; Fort Leavenworth, KS : US Army Command and General Staff College,
Date; Original 1997-06-06
Date; Digital 2007
Call number; ADA 331530
Release statement; Approved for public release; Distribution is unlimited. The opinions and conclusions expressed herein are those of the student-authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College or any other governmental agency. (References to these studies should include the foregoing statement.)
Repository; Combined Arms Research Library
Library; Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library
Date created; 2007-04-20
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#19
DigitalCommons@UNO
Student Work
6-1-1968

A study of the activities of James Dunwoody Bulloch: Confederate naval agent in Great Britain
by Michael T. Young

University of Nebraska at Omaha
This Thesis is brought to you for free and open access by DigitalCommons@UNO. It has been accepted for inclusion in Student Work by an authorized administrator of DigitalCommons@UNO. For more information, please contact unodigitalcommons@unomaha.edu.

https://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1483&context=studentwork

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USS ALASKA

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#20
One to go with @DaveBrt 's thread - https://civilwartalk.com/threads/css-pee-dee-cannons-raised.120006/ ...

University of South Carolina
Scholar Commons
Presentations Maritime Research Division
4-1-2012

Mars Bluff Navy Yard
by Christopher F. Amer

University of South Carolina - Columbia
This Presentation is brought to you for free and open access by the Maritime Research Division at Scholar Commons. It has been accepted for inclusion in Presentations by an authorized administrator of Scholar Commons. For more information, please contact SCHOLARC@mailbox.sc.edu.

THE MARS BLUFF NAVY YARD - Being a Brief Accounting of the Confederate Mars Bluff Navy Yard on the Great Pee Dee River, the Ships, Boats, and Vessels Built There, a Brief History of Underwater Archaeology Conducted at the Site, and Future Archaeological Plans.
Christopher F. Amer (MRD-SCIAA/USC)
Ted Gragg (SC Civil War Museum, PDRART)
Bob Butler (SCRART)
Presented to the S.C.V. Camp 1963, May 3, 2012


https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&context=mrd_prsn

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