Act of Kindness 10 Years Later: Sword of E F Bishop, Adjutant 89th Illinois

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lelliott19

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Sword of Adjutant EF Bishop offered in Macon.JPG

Published in the Rome Tri-Weekly Courier, Jul. 27, 1875, page 4.
I assume the sword was captured. This offer to return it was made more than ten years after the war ended. I searched for an Adjutant named Bishop in the 87th Illinois, but was unable to locate one. Maybe someone else can locate him? Unfortunately, the name of the person offering to return the sword is not included in the article.

It bears the following inscription: "Presented to Adjutant E. F. Bishop, 87th Regiment Illinois Volunteers, September 3d, 1862."

 
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Blessmag

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There is not a name in the 87th listed with the last name Bishop. I just checked the 87th Ill roster to try and confirm the initials.

The adjutant is a John D. Martin and states he was in office the whole enlistment. Could the regiment number be wrong??
 
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Package4

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Lelliott19 - What a great news clip from the past! I suppose those of us who find this stuff so fascinating will now wonder if the sword was ever repatriated with Adjutant Bishop? And, the next question would be does anyone know of its whereabouts today?
J.
Yes, I wonder the same, it is a little perplexing that he was discharged prior to their heading into Georgia, I wonder if one of his fellow officers borrowed it upon his discharge...........I guess he could have misplaced it and it ended up with the baggage train in Georgia. No doubt he had a couple of swords. I guess it could have been captured in previous action in Tennessee?
 
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Package4

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View attachment 178040
Published in the Rome Tri-Weekly Courier, Jul. 27, 1875, page 4.
I assume the sword was captured. This offer to return it was made more than ten years after the war ended. I searched for an Adjutant named Bishop in the 87th Illinois, but was unable to locate one. Maybe someone else can locate him? Unfortunately, the name of the person offering to return the sword is not included in the article.

It bears the following inscription: "Presented to Adjutant E. F. Bishop, 87th Regiment Illinois Volunteers, September 3d, 1862."
This is really cool!
 
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lelliott19

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Bishop , Edward F.
BATTLE UNIT NAME:
89th Regiment, Illinois Infantry
BISHOP, Edward F Adjutant Chicago Aug 25, 1862 Aug 25, 1862 Discharged Dec 28, 1863
https://civilwar.illinoisgenweb.org/fs/089-fs.html

Thanks!!!!!

Lelliott19 - What a great news clip from the past! I suppose those of us who find this stuff so fascinating will now wonder if the sword was ever repatriated with Adjutant Bishop? And, the next question would be does anyone know of its whereabouts today?
J.
Indeed. My thoughts exactly!

Macon also in not listed in the county list for that regiment.
The article was from Macon (Georgia) and reprinted in the Rome (Georgia) Tri-Weekly so I assume the person who was offering to return it had captured it somewhere. Since you located E F Bishop in the 89th IL , one would need to know where the 89th IL might have been fighting prior to the Dec 28, 1863 discharge date? And at which of those places they might have faced off against a Georgia regiment that got the better of them?

This is really cool!
I knew you'd like it! Wonder if the sword resides in a private collection today? If so, Im sure the owner would LOVE to know about this article. :wavespin:

Yes, I wonder the same, it is a little perplexing that he was discharged prior to their heading into Georgia, I wonder if one of his fellow officers borrowed it upon his discharge...........I guess he could have misplaced it and it ended up with the baggage train in Georgia. No doubt he had a couple of swords. I guess it could have been captured in previous action in Tennessee?
Might not have been captured in Georgia. Might have been somewhere that a GA regiment got the best of the 89th IL prior to Bishop's discharge.
 
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It would appear as if you have unearthed a real hero and an incredibly fascinating man, no mention of the sword though:

The Tribune
26 March 1913

Col. E. F. Bishop

The papers announce this Feb. 26, 1913, the death of our veteran friend, Col. Bishop of Denver, a brother of Mrs. E. P. Peck of Omaha. Soon after the Pecks bought their summer home here, Mrs. Peck’s sister and family and Col. Bishop rented a place here in town for a few weeks in summer and when the colonel left for the west he left me some things from his chemical laboratory, our friendship, being renewed each time came on a visit to the Peck farm. He carried the mark of a sabre cut on his face received at Stone River.

From a letter written to us from Denver, August 28, 1906, we quote. After thanking us for certain information etc., he says:

“Dear Comrade—Many recollections are revived by your interesting information. I am something of a pioneer myself. I passed through Omaha for the wild and wooly west in 1867; staging from Ft. Sedwick to Denver. I had been in the 89th Illinois infantry, wounded at Stone River (or Murphreesboro) and Chickamauga and was restless under the restraints of civil life in Chicago, so I started with an old hunter and trapper for a year clothed in buckskin and living on game in the Rocky Mountains. During this time I had many interesting adventures with Indians and wild animals. I then went into the cattle business and was a cowboy in Wyoming seven years. I have seen fully one thousand antelopes at one time, to say nothing of Sioux, Arapahoe, and Cheyenne Indians. But those day are past and gone never to return and I am now living in the beautiful city of Denver, with 200,000 inhabitants, and lovely Omaha has grown from a frontier village to a wonderful and great city. I have been visiting my brother-in-law and dear sister, Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Peck, in their lovely country hoe and was much pleased with crops and scenery. Someday I should like to hear of your historical matter and may give a few stories and escapes from flood, etc. that will interest you.

With kind regards to you and all old army comrades and pioneers,

I am sincerely yours,
Edward F. Bishop

Denver Rocky Mountain News
24 February 1913

Col. Bishop, Famous Civil War Veteran and Pioneer Dies.

Denver Real Estate Dealer and friend of the late C.B. Kountze, banker who died yesterday in La Jolla, left big fortune.


Colonel Edward F. Bishop, aged68, who came to Colorado at the close of the civil war and whose life as a pioneer embraced all the varied experiences of early Western days, died yesterday in La Jolla, California, where he went from Denver four years ago for his health.

Colonel Bishop leaves an estate of more than $500,000. He owned Denver real estate worth approximately $250,000. He sold property valued in excess of that amount upon retiring from active business shortly before going to California Much of the estate is in the form of bonds.

Was Formerly Court Clerk.

Word of his death was received here by the family of his son, Edward A. Bishop, vice president of the Cass Investment company, one of the largest realty companies of the city.

He is survived also by a half-brother, Charles W. Bishop, clerk of the United States District court. Colonel Bishop was clerk of that court during most of the time Judge Moses Hallett sat on the federal bench in this city.

A soldier at 16, brevet colonel in the Union Army at 19, a trapper at 20 and in turn, a stock grower, real estate deal, banker, and club man. Colonel Bishop’s career was that of a true westerner. He was associated with the men who are frequently called the “Empire builders of the West.” He was an associate of Charles B. Kountz, David Moffat, and Walter Cheesman. He was also an intimate friend of Kountz, the late banker.

Kountz Meeting: Dramatic

Their first meeting was dramatic. They were riding to Denver over the old stage line, which operated between Denver and Cheyenne. It was in the early seventies (1870’s) before either man gained wealth or influence. Colonel Bishop was riding with the driver. About half way to Denver, the outfit was halted for rest and water. When ready to start, Colonel Bishop observed a new passenger in the act of climbing inside the coach among the mail pouches. With the idea of guarding the mail, Colonel Bishop abandoned his seat on top of the couch and joined the man inside. They chatted and became quite friendly before reaching Denver.

The first year of Colonel Bishop’s life in Colorado was spent in Estes Park. It was a virgin paradise of nature and had felt the feet of only half a dozen white men. His sole companion was an adventurous trapper. Together they hunted, living from the flesh of wild game, and bartering with the Indians. For twelve months they saw the face of no other man.


Goes Early to Cheyenne

Colonel Bishop went to Cheyenne when it as a mere village. There he engaged in the business of raising cattle with the husband of Mrs. Mary A. Miff, who later became the wife of the late Bishop Henry White Warren of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Colonel Bishop was married to Ellen Dates in 1874, about the time he came to Denver.

During his life in Cheyenne, Colonel Bishop was a leader in resisting the raids of Indians. H was the natural choice of the settlers in this warfare, because of his Civil War experience. He entered the Thirty-ninth Illinois regiment as an adjutant when the war started and was activity engaged in the fighting and maneuvers throughout the struggle.


While riding near the head of a column at the Battle of Chickamauga, Colonel Bishop was shot and nearly killed by a sharpshooter, who was hiding in a tree overhead. The bullet entered his skull just below the right temple and ranged downward the right temple into his throat. Another time he lost the ends of three fingers of his left hand in the Battle of Chancellorsville. He also took part in overcoming the attempt to deliver 500 rebel prisoners from the Union prison at Chicago.

When he became brevet colonel, he was made a member of the Loyal Legion, composed of officers of the Civil War. He was a member of the G.A.R. post of Chicago, his home. The wounds he sustained in the war and later injuries were largely responsible for his decline in health and death.


~~~ Obituary courtesy of the Washington County Genealogical Society. Newspaper clippings on file in the Blair Library at Blair Nebraska.~~
 
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It would appear as if you have unearthed a real hero and an incredibly fascinating man, no mention of the sword though:

The Tribune
26 March 1913

Col. E. F. Bishop

The papers announce this Feb. 26, 1913, the death of our veteran friend, Col. Bishop of Denver, a brother of Mrs. E. P. Peck of Omaha. Soon after the Pecks bought their summer home here, Mrs. Peck’s sister and family and Col. Bishop rented a place here in town for a few weeks in summer and when the colonel left for the west he left me some things from his chemical laboratory, our friendship, being renewed each time came on a visit to the Peck farm. He carried the mark of a sabre cut on his face received at Stone River.

From a letter written to us from Denver, August 28, 1906, we quote. After thanking us for certain information etc., he says:

“Dear Comrade—Many recollections are revived by your interesting information. I am something of a pioneer myself. I passed through Omaha for the wild and wooly west in 1867; staging from Ft. Sedwick to Denver. I had been in the 89th Illinois infantry, wounded at Stone River (or Murphreesboro) and Chickamauga and was restless under the restraints of civil life in Chicago, so I started with an old hunter and trapper for a year clothed in buckskin and living on game in the Rocky Mountains. During this time I had many interesting adventures with Indians and wild animals. I then went into the cattle business and was a cowboy in Wyoming seven years. I have seen fully one thousand antelopes at one time, to say nothing of Sioux, Arapahoe, and Cheyenne Indians. But those day are past and gone never to return and I am now living in the beautiful city of Denver, with 200,000 inhabitants, and lovely Omaha has grown from a frontier village to a wonderful and great city. I have been visiting my brother-in-law and dear sister, Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Peck, in their lovely country hoe and was much pleased with crops and scenery. Someday I should like to hear of your historical matter and may give a few stories and escapes from flood, etc. that will interest you.

With kind regards to you and all old army comrades and pioneers,

I am sincerely yours,
Edward F. Bishop

Denver Rocky Mountain News
24 February 1913

Col. Bishop, Famous Civil War Veteran and Pioneer Dies.

Denver Real Estate Dealer and friend of the late C.B. Kountze, banker who died yesterday in La Jolla, left big fortune.


Colonel Edward F. Bishop, aged68, who came to Colorado at the close of the civil war and whose life as a pioneer embraced all the varied experiences of early Western days, died yesterday in La Jolla, California, where he went from Denver four years ago for his health.

Colonel Bishop leaves an estate of more than $500,000. He owned Denver real estate worth approximately $250,000. He sold property valued in excess of that amount upon retiring from active business shortly before going to California Much of the estate is in the form of bonds.

Was Formerly Court Clerk.

Word of his death was received here by the family of his son, Edward A. Bishop, vice president of the Cass Investment company, one of the largest realty companies of the city.

He is survived also by a half-brother, Charles W. Bishop, clerk of the United States District court. Colonel Bishop was clerk of that court during most of the time Judge Moses Hallett sat on the federal bench in this city.

A soldier at 16, brevet colonel in the Union Army at 19, a trapper at 20 and in turn, a stock grower, real estate deal, banker, and club man. Colonel Bishop’s career was that of a true westerner. He was associated with the men who are frequently called the “Empire builders of the West.” He was an associate of Charles B. Kountz, David Moffat, and Walter Cheesman. He was also an intimate friend of Kountz, the late banker.

Kountz Meeting: Dramatic

Their first meeting was dramatic. They were riding to Denver over the old stage line, which operated between Denver and Cheyenne. It was in the early seventies (1870’s) before either man gained wealth or influence. Colonel Bishop was riding with the driver. About half way to Denver, the outfit was halted for rest and water. When ready to start, Colonel Bishop observed a new passenger in the act of climbing inside the coach among the mail pouches. With the idea of guarding the mail, Colonel Bishop abandoned his seat on top of the couch and joined the man inside. They chatted and became quite friendly before reaching Denver.

The first year of Colonel Bishop’s life in Colorado was spent in Estes Park. It was a virgin paradise of nature and had felt the feet of only half a dozen white men. His sole companion was an adventurous trapper. Together they hunted, living from the flesh of wild game, and bartering with the Indians. For twelve months they saw the face of no other man.


Goes Early to Cheyenne

Colonel Bishop went to Cheyenne when it as a mere village. There he engaged in the business of raising cattle with the husband of Mrs. Mary A. Miff, who later became the wife of the late Bishop Henry White Warren of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Colonel Bishop was married to Ellen Dates in 1874, about the time he came to Denver.

During his life in Cheyenne, Colonel Bishop was a leader in resisting the raids of Indians. H was the natural choice of the settlers in this warfare, because of his Civil War experience. He entered the Thirty-ninth Illinois regiment as an adjutant when the war started and was activity engaged in the fighting and maneuvers throughout the struggle.


While riding near the head of a column at the Battle of Chickamauga, Colonel Bishop was shot and nearly killed by a sharpshooter, who was hiding in a tree overhead. The bullet entered his skull just below the right temple and ranged downward the right temple into his throat. Another time he lost the ends of three fingers of his left hand in the Battle of Chancellorsville. He also took part in overcoming the attempt to deliver 500 rebel prisoners from the Union prison at Chicago.

When he became brevet colonel, he was made a member of the Loyal Legion, composed of officers of the Civil War. He was a member of the G.A.R. post of Chicago, his home. The wounds he sustained in the war and later injuries were largely responsible for his decline in health and death.


~~~ Obituary courtesy of the Washington County Genealogical Society. Newspaper clippings on file in the Blair Library at Blair Nebraska.~~
What I find amazing is that this last obituary says that he lost the ends of three fingers at Chancellorsville, he may have lost the digits, but it was not at Chancellorsville (the 89th IL was not sent East), he said that he was wounded at Stones River and Chickamauga.
 

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There's a short biographical sketch of him here but it doesn't say much else y'all don't already know: https://books.google.com/books?id=_HUQAwAAQBAJ&lpg=RA1-PA332-IA3&dq=colonel edward f. bishop&pg=RA1-PA332-IA3#v=onepage&q&f=false

Since you located E F Bishop in the 89th IL , one would need to know where the 89th IL might have been fighting prior to the Dec 28, 1863 discharge date? And at which of those places they might have faced off against a Georgia regiment that got the better of them?
The 89th Illinois was in August Willich's brigade at both Stones River and Chickamauga. There were Georgia troops across from them in Rains' brigade at Stones River (3rd and 9th GA battalions) and Jackson's brigade at Chickamauga (1st and 5th GA infantry regiments and 2nd Battalion GA Sharpshooters) on the first day, Sept. 19. On the second day of Chickamauga there were some other Georgia regiments in their vicinity but not directly engaged with the 89th IL or Willich's brigade.

But the sword was also just as likely to have been dropped and picked up by a random soldier after the battle or after Bishop's regiment withdrew from the field. Its also possible that it found its way to Georgia after the war.
 
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