Accounts of the Vicksburg Crater

AUG

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Vicksburg Crater.jpg


There's already a few threads on the Vicksburg Crater, but in order to make them more accessible I'll post some of the best firsthand accounts of the incident here.


From With Grant at Fort Donelson, Shiloh and Vicksburg by Sgt. Wilbur F. Crummer, 45th Illinois Infantry:

Fort Hill [Third Louisiana Redan] is said to be the key to Vicksburg. We have tried often to turn this key, and have as often failed—in fact, the lock is not an easy one, but we soon shall try the burglar's plan, and with the aid of powder to blow the lock to "smithereens." The sap or trench is run to the fort and the fort is mined, boys digging the dirt and carrying it out in boxes. Great holes are dug underneath the fort, and miners from the Lead Mine, 45th Illinois Regiment, who understand tamping, have charged the 2,200 pounds of powder, and all is ready to light the fuse.​
June, the 25th, a heavy artillery fire opened all along the line, and at 2:30 p.m., the explosion takes place. Huge masses of earth were thrown in the air, and the ground was shaken as by an earthquake. As soon as the earth was rent, a bright glare of fire issued from burning powder, but quickly died away, as there was nothing combustible in the fort. A few Confederate soldiers were hurled into the air, one or two of whom came down inside our lines, and some were buried in the fort, as was proven a few years after the war, when the fort was dismantled and turned into a cotton field, a few skeletons were found buried underneath. One negro boy fell among the men of our company. He gathered himself together, and looked around as through he thought the day of judgment had surely come. One of our boys asked him how far up he thought he had gone, and he replied: "Don't know, Massa; 'bout free miles, I guess." He believed it, for I never saw such a frightened look on any one's face, and his eyes stood out and looked unnatural.​
When the smoke and dust had cleared away partly, a great saucer-shaped crater was seen, where before was the A-shaped Fort Hill. It was large enough to hold about 60 or 80 men. The 23rd Indiana and the 45th Illinois were in the trenches ready to charge; the command was given before the dust had fully settled; the 23rd Indiana charging to the left of the crater to the top of the works; the 45th Illinois up and into the crater. The enemy had come up behind a big pile of earth thrown out by the explosion, and as we went into the crater, they met us with a terrible volley of musketry, but on the boys went, up and over the embankment with a cheer, the enemy falling back a few paces to an inner or second line of breastworks, where are placed cannon loaded with grape and canister, and these cannon belched forth their death-dealing missiles, in addition to the heavy musketry fire, with such telling effect that may of the brave boys fall to rise no more; the line wavers, staggers, then falls behind into the crater. The enemy charge on us, but we repel them at the west bank of the crater, and a hand-to-hand conflict rages for hours; hand grenades and loaded shells are lighted and thrown over the parapet as you would play ball. These shells and hand grenades carry death, as many as a dozen men being killed and wounded at one explosion. It seems to me, in looking back, a wonder that anyone in that hot place was left to tell the story. I have witnessed our men grab these shells, at the risk of their exploding, and fling them back. Many a brave hero laid down his life in that death hole, or, as we most appropriately called it, "Fort Hell."​
The Chicago Tribune had its correspondent in the field and, in the issues of that paper on July 3 and 6, 1863, he speaks of the charge and fighting in the crater, saying : * * * "A wide embrasure in the embankment was made into which the noble Lead Mine Regiment, led by Colonel Maltby, rushed in and at once planted our banner amid a terrific fire from the enemy. The conduct of the 45th Illinois Regiment was grand in the extreme. Universal commendation is bestowed for the gallant manner that regiment performed the duty assigned it, and in no small degree upon the field officers who so nobly inspired the men by taking the advance and marching up to the muzzles of the enemy's guns, so near that for a time it was a hand-to-hand fight. The colors of the regiment planted on the parapet of the fort are literally torn to pieces by the shots of the enemy. Two of the field officers, Lieut. Col. Smith and Major Fisk, are no more. Col. Maltby is still suffering from a severe wound."​
We fought at close range with the enemy over that embankment of earth, many of the men receiving bayonet wounds. A cypress log, with port holes cut on the under side, was brought into the crater, and in helping to place it on the parapet, Col. James A. Maltby was severely wounded by splinters from the log. A solid shot from a cannon hit the log, hurling it with terrific force against the Colonel and his small command. Gen. John A. Logan said of Col. Maltby, at the siege of Vicksburg: "He is the bravest man I ever saw on the field of battle." He was in the Mexican War, badly wounded at Chapultepec, then at Fort Donelson in 1862 and then at Vicksburg. He was justly promoted to be a Brigadier General for his bravery.​
A detail of about two companies would hold the crater for two hours or more, their rapid firing causing the rifles to become hot and foul, and the men weary and worn out, when two other companies would slip in and take their places. Badeau, in his history of Gen. Grant, says : "Details from Leggett's brigade relieved each other all night long, in their attempt to hold the crater." I want to correct his history and say, as I have a right to say, for I was there and speak from what I know to be the facts, it was no "attempt," it was an accomplished fact that we held it, but to our great loss, until the order was received to give it up.​
What a terrible sacrifice it was to hold that little piece of ground. It probably was all right to have made the charge into the crater after the explosion and try to make a breech inside the enemy's lines, but it surely was a serious mistake, either of Gen. Grant or Gen. McPherson, to cause that crater to be held for over 48 hours with the loss of brave men every hour. I remember, upon returning to the trenches, after having been relieved in the crater, of passing Gen. John A. Logan, surrounded by some of his aid-de-camp, and as they bore past him some wounded hero, he broke forth with vehemence, saying: "My God! they are killing my bravest men in that hole." Someone suggested that the place be given up. He said in reply : "I can't; my commanding officer orders me to hold every inch of ground." The crater was at last given up and we resumed the ordinary duties of every-day life in the trenches and in camp.​
 

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AUG

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Capt. John M. Weidemeyer's account from his journal. He commanded Company F of the 6th Missouri Infantry (CS), in Cockrell's 1st Missouri Brigade.

Everything with us more quiet than usual till 1 P.M. when we heard a dull heavy sound and felt the hill shake like an earth quake – The Yankees had blown up our parapet – We had been expecting this for several days - We promptly got into line and ran to the parapet found great confusion – The enemy in heavy lines of infantry rushing for the breach that had been made by the beast. Our men stunned hurried and scared – Col [Eugene] Erwin threw our regiment in the breach and we returned the fire upon the Yanks never did such a hurricane of leaden balls whistle over anything before, but we held our ground and repulsed the charge –​
Then the enemy used the square logs to roll over the works & as the sawed holes in these came upermost they would fire on us – We had one cannon a 20 pound parrot gun – we loaded it with solid ball and find it at the log only a few yards away, struck it in the middle, Knocked it into splinters & Killed many of the men who were behind it. Then they tried with cotton bales, rolling them before them in a line as tho they would roll them over us – Our cannon would not do against this approach for they had gotten so close that the men who tried to use it was shot down. They rolled the bales to within ten steps of us before we succeeded in stopping them At this distance the fight was Kept up all evening – and all night – Some twenty of our men were wounded by hand granades thrown by the Yanks in a few minutes – This was a new mode of fighting the men could not stand to have so many of them bursting in their midst at one time. They parted both ways, leaving the space where the granade are falling so thick –​
Col [Eugene] Erwin thinking we were about to break, jumped upon the top of the works shouting to the men to follow him – He was instantly shot with three bullets – one passing through his heart – my company was the right of the regiment & we were enfilading the line approaching behind the cotton bales Wm [William H.] Greenwell was Killed, [Thomas] Green wounded in the arm then in the foot [both in Weidmeyer's company]. As soon as Col Erwin was Killed – Maj [Stephen] Cooper (now the ranking officer) sent for me to come to him and assist him to manage the regiment. My Company took the brush. Wm Park [William Parks, of his company] was shot in the hand, then Col McKowens [John P. McCown] regt [5th Missouri Infantry] came to our assistance The battle was Kept up all night – each party afraid to show their heads, we above our works and they above their cotton bales – Firing was done by holding guns up and firing at random – At the time Col Erwin was Killed two Yankee officers who were trying to lead the charge were killed –​
Friday 26th June This morning our men became tired of firing without looking & doing no execution so began to raise up and take aim at the Yanks arms as they lifted them above their heads to shoot By ten o’clock we had driven them away from their position – During the night both sides had thrown a great many hand granades – or loaded boms that burst from the Concussion of falling which were thrown by hand – We learned here to manage thus – Our men would catch them before they struck the ground and throw them back to the Yanks – Ours were made with a fuse which we lighted before throwing – They would nearly always explode in the feds ranks – Our regiment lost six men evening and night. Col McKowns regt lost 12 The 3rd La [3rd Louisiana Infantry] lost 20. As soon as we drove back the line from the cotton bales a terrific cannonade was directed against us – Saturday 27th – We recover our outer works – The engineers are at work with a body of negroes repairing them – The Yanks – still throw granades which are caught and sent back – Seven men were at work in a counter mine on the 25th when the hill was blown up – 6 were burned & 1 escaped –​
Saturday 27th Continued Genl [Martin E.] Green was shot in the head today by a sharp shooter whilst he was in our trenches and instantly killed – Our regt [6th Missouri Infantry], was relieved from the breastworks at 12 o’clock at night by 2nd Mo [2nd Missouri Infantry] Sunday 28th – Firing not so heavy this morning. The Yanks are again mining our parapet and are running their trench paralell with our breastworks – Their line is within 20 feet of ours – We threw a great many granades to retard their work – They have in one front two 8 in and one 10 inch guns with which they plow down our earthworks – We lost 3 men Killed and 2 wounded last night – We were in the trenches till 6 P.M. then again relieved by 2nd Mo. My Company lost no men this time – Whilst I was posting a guard for the 2 mo, a shell burst immediately over our heads and scared the Lieut that was with me – My left shoulder pains me a good deal today – The doctor says it is rheumatism – I never had such a thing before –​
Monday 29th – Our regt relieve Col McKowns [McCown] [5th Missouri Infantry] at 6 o’clock this morning – My shoulder has grown worse – The fire is Kept up by Yanks about as usual about 11 a.m. We hear heavy artillery firing in the direction of Snyders bluff [Mississippi] We believe it is Genl Johnsons [Joseph E. Johnston] advance – We are looking for him all the time – Other Cavelry got in last night but Genl [John C.] Pemberton will not permit them to tell us the news – Tuesday 30th – Our regt relieved Col McKown at 12 last night My shoulder so painful I did not go to the works Gunboats were seen shelling our works near Millicans bend [Battle of Milliken’s Bend, Mississippi] – It is supposed that [Henry E.] McCulloch with his cavelry is there – Yanks are rapidly mining our parapet & we are looking for another blow up – we think they are mining in two places we continue to throw granades – but cannot stop their work – quiet today – It is said that a courier from Johnsons army got in last night He says that Army is all on this side Big Black [River] and that Johnson has a large force – The Yanks are running reinforcements from up the river – Our regt returned the 2nd at 6 P.M. Threw over a barrel of powder at 10 P.M. to try to stop their work by setting off their train – not successful – my shoulder better – made payrolls – some of our soldiers eating mule meat – using at the hospital for ten days –​
Wednesday 1 July 1863 Quiet this Morning – We relieve the 5th [5th Missouri Infantry] at 12 m. The silence of the morning was a forerunner of storm in the evening. At 1:30 P.M. our parapet was blown up – The whole top of the hill was blown into the air – As the earth fell many of our men were covered up with it. 22 were lost entirely, many others were dug out and saved – Several were blown into the air and badly bruised by falling One was Killed in this way – Everything was thrown in to great consternation and confusion when the explosion occured – Men ran off leaving guns cartridge boxes and everything behind – Knowing or thinking of nothing but to get from under the hill that had been blown into the air – They soon recovered their senses and rushed to their position again –​
The Yankees did not attempt to charge through the breach, tho. it was quite large – They opened a furious cannonade and volley after volley of musketry upon the dismantled parapet – A good many of our men were Killed and wounded – The enemy had erected two small wooden morters that threw 6 & 12 lb shells into our ranks with accuracy and do considerable damage with them. My 1st Lieutenant Jno [John] T. Crenshaw [6th Missouri Infantry] was burried in the explosion – We could not find his body – Joshua Keavy [Joshua C. Keeney] Henry Ledbetter [James] Ray Addington all of my company [6th Missouri Infantry] were wounded. Lieut. Col. Sentrey of the 2nd Mo was Killed by a sharp shooter – The loss of our regt. in the fight and explosion will reach near 40 men –​
Thursday 2nd The 1st Mo. came up last night to support us Our brigade is now all together again and is given the defense of this important place where the Yanks are making such strong effort to break through our line – The Yanks threw over to us this morning a note wrapped around a bullet – It read “The rear of Vicksburg 2nd July 1863. Please come over and bring your n*****s we have buried your white men. How do you like to be elevated? Your friends in a horse” Before the explosion we had men in a countermine that were digging to meet the Yankees under ground. Several Negroes were employed to help in the digging – The men who were working in this excavation I suppose are the ones that were blown over and the ones refered to in the note mentioned above – Our loss this morning is eight wounded –​

John M. Weidemeyer 2.jpg

Image from The Confederate Veteran, Vol. 21, p. 293.
Colonel Eugene Erwin.jpg

Col. A. Eugene Erwin, who was killed commanding the 6th Missouri in a counterattack on the crater.
 

AUG

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#3
From A True Sketch of His Army Life by S. C. Beck, 124th Illinois Infantry:

The "Sap" or trench we dug was twelve feet wide, six feet deep and some seven hundred feet long commencing at our left rear and extending up to a Rebel Fort in our front. It was made very crooked so that the Rebels could not rake it from any direction. The loose dirt from the ditch was thrown on the side of the Rebel fire. Square timbers were placed on top of this dirt with gains cut on bottom side for us to look through and to shoot through without exposing ourselves to their fire. These breast works served us the entire siege, were occupied day and night where we became very efficient marksman. If a Reb exposed himself in the slightest degree he was our "meat" sure. The same could be said of the Rebels. . . . Constant firing of artillery and sharpshooting day after day and night after night and digging rifle pits in every available place constituted our duties. We were up so close to the enemy picket duty was abandoned, firing from the rifle pits took its place. . . .​
In digging the trench from our lines up to the Rebel fort our men had a flat car covered with cottonbales which they rolled in front of the sappers to prevent the Rebels from disturbing the miners. As soon as it got near enough the Rebels threw turpentine balls lighted on to this car and burned it up. That spoiled our protection. After this we used bales of cotton, as we advanced the cotton bales were rolled ahead of us. Some genius made a wooden morter out of a log. He hollowed out the log placed some bands or iron around it and by using a small charge of powder it would toss a six pound shell over the works on to the enemy. . . .​
Our duties we thought were very heavy. We did our own cooking, washed our clothes once a week, that was very necessary on account of the vermin being so plenty, sharpshooting and digging trenches. At last we got the trenches done, the big trench being completed up to the Rebel fort, about the middle of June. All the while we kept up active sharpshooting from every available spot at every thing we saw move—man or beast.​
It was thought best by some to blow up Fort Hill [Third Louisiana Redan]. That would break the Rebel line sufficient to allow the Federals to march through the lines and take possession of Vicksburg. So miners were put to work drifting under this fort. They made a main shaft near the center of the fort then drifted three in different directions. When they completed this they planted three mines of powder twelve hundred pounds each, and filled up the drifts with timbers and cordwood. Being all ready the explosion took place at four P. M., on the 25th of June. The artillery all along the line was active at that hour. The purpose was to hold the Rebels from reinforcing where the explosion took place, thereby the assaulting column would not meet with so heavy resistance.​
Our Brigade was to be the assaulting column which was as follows: The 20th Ills., 31st Ills., 45th Ills., 124th Ills., 23rd Indiana. Having been notified we were all ready. Every man had his gun loaded and waiting for orders to move. At last the explosion was heard. As soon as the debris cleared away the 45th Ills. made the assault. In a few minutes the 31st Ills. took the place of the 45th boys. A few minutes more the 20th Ills. relieved the 31st. All fought desparately losing some valuable officers and a great many men. It was given up as a failure, the lay of the ground on Rebel side of works was impregnable. The 124th Ills. was standing in line nearby expecting to be ordered any moment into the fray. But night coming on we were ordered back into the rifle pits to do sharpshooting which was kept up all night. On the morning of the 26th the 124th was ordered into the "Crater" or place of the mine explosion. This place as near as I can describe it was shaped like a large wash basin and was about fifty feet in diameter. There was next to the Rebels a bank of the fort perhaps eight feet higher than any other part of what was left of the fort after the explosion. There were eight Companies of our Regt. two of which were ordered into the Crater at a time, stayed in twenty minutes then were relieved by two other Companies. This was the order for the entire day. One third of the men were placed as near the top of this bank or crest of fort as they could get and not be seen by the Rebels for the purpose of firing the guns the other two-thirds of the men, who were lower down in the Crater, loaded and passed up to us.​
My position was up near the crest of the fort on the firing line. Those gun barrels became very hot, so much so that my left hand became seared or blistered in handling those hot guns. My duty was to poke the loaded gun over this bank and fire it off having no knowledge whether I was doing any execution or not. After firing passed the gun down to be reloaded. Perhaps we had been two or three times in this Crater when the Rebels began tossing six pound shells with lighted fuse over at us. They came directly over my head, could have reached those shells if so disposed. I knew too well their contents and what they meant for us if we happened to be in their way. I think it was the first one they threw over that rolled into Robert Vance's lap and exploded, he was sitting down about sixteen feet from where I was. He fell forward on his face mangled badly. In a few minutes another came over rolled to his side then exploded tearing the poor man into shreads. Soon another came over and exploded, mortally wounding Greorge Grabendike and George Lanham. All three belonged to my Company and were married men.​
It was too much for mortal man to stand such destruction. Those men of that vicinity who could get away did so, leaving the Crater and went out into the trench. As the gunloaders had fled for saftey, I made it my business to follow as I had no ammunition to work with. It was a very hot place to be in if we had had nothing to have done, no breeze could touch us. Then add those bursting shells that filled the air with dirt throwing it all over us. It simply can not be described. It was terrific. It was afterwards named "The Slaughter Pen." The Rebels could tell they were doing execution for they could hear our men holler and groan when struck, as there was only a few feet space between us and them. This work they kept up for some hours. Other Companies suffered badly. Many of our men had their hands wounded while firing over the crest of the fort by bullets from the enemy. Toward evening we were relieved by a. Reg’t of another Brigade. When my Company fell in to be relieved there were only ten, that morning there were twenty-two. These eight Companies had lost over fifty men. The Reg't. that relieved us was not ordered into the Crater but was placed in the trench to keep up sharpshooting all night.​
After being relieved we marched to our camp—what was left of us​
—tired and dirty, to get us some supper. By some miraculous power I had not been hurt.​
The days work proved useless. Our side had not gained any advantage by all this strenuous work. We settled down to regular siege work—sharpshooting. We had become experts with our rifles. If a Rebels or any living thing showed himself he was in great danger of a Yank bullet. You will wonder at our fixing after dark and throughout the night. The orders were to keep up a constant fire. Every man was expected to fire forty rounds during his two hours of duty. All that was expected of us was to point our guns toward the enemy and fire. It that was a common saying with the boys that we were shelling the woods with our bullets. After the surrender a Confederate soldier told me that a Johnnie was killed while walking his beat in front of Gen. Pemberton's headquarters which was two and a half mile from the firing line.​
So much firing caused us to pad our right shoulders, as the constant back action was such that this padding became very necessary. I have not to this day forgotten how sore my shoulder was at that time.​
The engineers with a detail of men were busy drifting beneath Fort Hill, if successful to blow it up the second time. On July 1st, all being ready the mine was sprung. Oh my, what a sight it was. Timbers, dirt, men all in the air at once. The Confederates presuming that we would try to break the line at this point reinforced it heavily, not withstanding our artillery was playing on them all along the line. On they came. Our punishment at first blowing up was sufficient to satisfy all concerned.​
The last explosion was terrific in its destruction. Of the men we saw in the air there were six, three soldiers and three negroes, that fell on our side of line all dead but one, that one a negro lad about fifteen years old. Our boys said to him "How high up did you so Sambo? Don't know massa, spec about tree miles. Oh no Sambo? Well I went until I seen de stars. When I was coming down I met massa going up." This negro was taken to our Brigade headquarters (Gen. Legget's) where he remained as a lacky servant for some time. The punishment at this second explosion was all on the Rebels side. The immense amount of dirt was mostly shifted towards the Confederates which buried about fifty of their men alive. They expected the Yanks to charge at this time in an attempt to break their line, but were happily disappointed.​
The sharpshooting and shelling was kept up constantly day and night by the Federals until the third day of July we noticed their white flag on the Rebel works to our left and soon all along their line. This meant an armistice—or to cease hostilities—to cease firing.​
 
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#5
John Leach CO A 6th MO Infantry (CS)
Diary

"June 20- The enemy have dug up to our works in several places and in our front they have dug up to a parapet that the Third Louisiana were guarding. One of the Federals crawled upon our works to look over, but I do not suppose that he ever made any report for as soon as he showed his head a sharp shooter fired and turned him up to the sun.

June 25- All was as common this morning, except the mortars were more industrious than usual, until about 3 oclock p.m. when as our regiment was in its place on reserve, the mine under one of our paratetts was fired which made a tremendous explosion which made the hills shake to/their very center. This was a signal for an attack on our works and they at us with an awful yell and succeeded in climbing up on our works but was met by our boys. Which made them glad to keep on their own side. Our regiment being brought up to support the Third Louisiana some of us was placed in the ruins of the parapett. The Federals failing to take it by storm bought a large lot (g) with port holes cut in it and endeavored to role it on the top of our works, so that they could drive us out but our company was in the works and kept shooting them down as fast as they showed theirselves. We also brought up a cannon and fired on the log which cut it into and sent it rolling back over them. After this we kept up a constant firing at each other until 12 oclock next day. This was a very close engagment not more than ten steps apart throwing hangrenades from both sides it was in a shower of these little hand bums that our men gave back a few feet. When Colonel Erwin mounted upon the parapett and raised his cap saying come up here Company A, when he was pierced with three balls and fell to rise no more, thus fell our brave Colonel, one that we all loved and respected. If we had seen our father's fell it would not have thrown more of a damper over our regiment. He had led us on to victory, bit he has fought his last battle, his mild voice no more cheers us on to victory, as death but lays silent in death. Our in blast charge was about fifty killed and wounded. Lieutenant Lipscomb of our company was killed and seven wounded.

July 1- The Federals have been under mining our works again a little to the left of where the other blast was made and at twelve o'clock the mine was fired which made a powerful explosion throwing off the interior left wing of our parapett the blast came out on our side blowing a number up in the air and covering a number up. Eleven soldiers and nine negroes were smothered to death quite a number more covered up, but succeeded in getting them out before they smothered. Just as soon as the blast was set off they opened on that point with sixty pieces of cannon. They seemed determined to carry this point. Our men were thrown into a little confusion, bit there was enough stood their ground to give them quite a warm reception, if they had undertaken to come over our works. Our regiment lost seven killed and thirty wounded. Our loss was more than any other. "
 
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#7
W L Truman Wade/Walsh battery

http://www.cedarcroft.com/cw/memoir/index.html


He has a very interesting opinion on Vicksburg and it's defense, he is very critical. His whole work can be read at the above link.


"June 25th. Soome little excitement today, caused by blowing up of a redoubt near the Jackson road, on our line. The enemy charged into the crater, but were driven back by Cockrell's men in a few minutes, and made to pay dearly for their temerity. The 2nd Mo. Reg. was held in reserve under the hill just back of the redoubts, when blown up, and Gen. Cockrell was standing at the time, not far from the redoubt, and when he saw the enemy rush into the breach and others coming, it is said he ran to the top of the hill overlooking his old regiment, and yelled at the top of is great deep voice, "come up Second Missouri and die." The brave boys grabbed their guns and scrambled up that hill with a yell, and rushed into the opening, drove out the enemy, and established our line, and this was the last of the petty efforts made by Gen. Grant, to enter Vicksburg, by assault."
 

alan polk

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#10
W L Truman Wade/Walsh battery

http://www.cedarcroft.com/cw/memoir/index.html

Is this account posted in the Cockrell 1st Mo brigade thread over on Regimental Forums? If not, it would be useful there as well. Thanks for posting MOBDEnut!


He has a very interesting opinion on Vicksburg and it's defense, he is very critical. His whole work can be read at the above link.


"June 25th. Soome little excitement today, caused by blowing up of a redoubt near the Jackson road, on our line. The enemy charged into the crater, but were driven back by Cockrell's men in a few minutes, and made to pay dearly for their temerity. The 2nd Mo. Reg. was held in reserve under the hill just back of the redoubts, when blown up, and Gen. Cockrell was standing at the time, not far from the redoubt, and when he saw the enemy rush into the breach and others coming, it is said he ran to the top of the hill overlooking his old regiment, and yelled at the top of is great deep voice, "come up Second Missouri and die." The brave boys grabbed their guns and scrambled up that hill with a yell, and rushed into the opening, drove out the enemy, and established our line, and this was the last of the petty efforts made by Gen. Grant, to enter Vicksburg, by assault."
 



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