Museum Abraham Lincoln’s hair preserved in ‘priceless’ Syracuse sculpture (video)

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Belle Montgomery

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SYRACUSE, N.Y. --
A “priceless” sculpture made with human hair sits in a dimly lit back room of the Onondaga Historical Association on Montgomery Street.
Hair sculptures aren’t really a thing anymore, but hair jewelry and hair home decor were popular items to display during the Civil War era.
OHA’s hair sculpture or “hair wreath” dates back to 1864, and was made with the hair of President Abraham Lincoln and First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln, along with the hair of U.S. cabinet members and their wives.
OHA’s curator of history Robert Searing calls it one of the most “mind-blowing artifacts” in their archives.
OHA’s “hair wreath” dates back to 1864 and was made with the hair of President Abraham Lincoln, First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln and several cabinet members.
The foot-long sculpture, hermetically sealed in a gold-trimmed case, is called...

Rest of Article with video: https://www.syracuse.com/entertainment/2019/07/abraham-lincolns-hair-preserved-in-priceless-syracuse-sculpture-video.html
 

NH Civil War Gal

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That's really something and I wish they had shown a clear, overall picture of it. It's certainly of the time period. I'm tagging @Eleanor Rose so she can see this - I know she's traveling at the moment. This piece would have been the high spot of Victorian hair art in America!
 

NH Civil War Gal

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Poking around on this subject, I found this:


288_4397.jpg

Civil War Era Hair Wreath

The art of hair jewelry began in a small Swedish town but slowly spread across Europe and was brought to America in the 19th century. It did not gain popularity until after the death of Queen Victoria’s husband, Prince Albert, in 1861 at which time she wore jewelry made of hair. There are a few reasons that hair was a great choice for decoration; it does not decay, it can be used with metalwork or precious gems without damaging either, and it is symbolic of the departed. The use of hair jewelry in mourning demonstrates a personal connection with the deceased.



 
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Belle Montgomery

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Poking around on this subject, I found this:


View attachment 319734
Civil War Era Hair Wreath

The art of hair jewelry began in a small Swedish town but slowly spread across Europe and was brought to America in the 19th century. It did not gain popularity until after the death of Queen Victoria’s husband, Prince Albert, in 1861 at which time she wore jewelry made of hair. There are a few reasons that hair was a great choice for decoration; it does not decay, it can be used with metalwork or precious gems without damaging either, and it is symbolic of the departed. The use of hair jewelry in mourning demonstrates a personal connection with the deceased.
Lots of stuff if you look hard enough on this. I bought numbered cards off of Ebay years back and practiced with yarn but never got around to using hair. I have some tail/mane hair from some of my most beloved horses and planned to use it. Perhaps down the road.


 

Belle Montgomery

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Belle Montgomery

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I have our family bible that dates to 1796. Lots of different hair clippings in it rolled up in small pieces of paper. Wish they were labeled so I knew who they belonged to.
Wow! How cool! You're very lucky to still be able to literally "touch" your ancestors!
 
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