Abolitionist Union generals.

Saint Jude

Sergeant Major
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I don't know about the others, but Schurz definitely was.

Just read over some of my notes and found that Stephen D. Engle says in Yankee Dutchman that Sigel was an abolitionist as well. He also says that the slavery issue is what drew many Germans into national political activity.
 
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I'm wondering if most of those Germans from the 48 revolution were abolitionists, at mid-level. August Willich, Franz Siegel, Louis Blenker and Carl Schurz.
I know Willich fell out with Marx and Engels over wanting to start a revolution again in the 1850s, even though Engels , had been his aide-decamp in the 48,49 uprisings.
Willich was definitely an abolitionist as were most of the leading 48ers as you said. My biography of Willich will be published in the fall of 2020 through a major university press.
 

TnFed

First Sergeant
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Jun 18, 2018
I look forward to purchasing a copy. I found how he felt with the fame that Marx and Engels obtained.
 
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I'm wondering if most of those Germans from the 48 revolution were abolitionists, at mid-level. August Willich, Franz Siegel, Louis Blenker and Carl Schurz.
I know Willich fell out with Marx and Engels over wanting to start a revolution again in the 1850s, even though Engels , had been his aide-decamp in the 48,49 uprising
August Willich most likely was. If you're willing to duel Karl Marx for not being Communist enough, you're probably not a big fan of slavery
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
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Dec 5, 2019
Butler was absolutely not an abolitionist prewar. He was "the hunkerdest of Democrats" by his own definition. He was utterly contemptuous of true Abolitionists, and only became antislavery after witnessing the effects of the institution during the first months of the war.
But he sided not with the Hunkers but with the Barnburners (who were anti-slavery and supporters of the Wilmot Priviso; they eventually joined the Republican Party). In an 1854 letter to Martin van Buren, he called the Kansas-Nebraska Act "the most wanton, the most inexcusable piece of folly and wickedness ever perpetrated on our county".
 
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But he sided not with the Hunkers but with the Barnburners (who were anti-slavery and supporters of the Wilmot Priviso; they eventually joined the Republican Party). In an 1854 letter to Martin van Buren, he called the Kansas-Nebraska Act "the most wanton, the most inexcusable piece of folly and wickedness ever perpetrated on our county".

At the Democrat Convention in 1860 he voted 57 times for Jeff Davis because he believed that only a moderate could unite the party and he was a friend of Southern rights.
 
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Frank Blair Jr was a a early supporter of the Republican party and was well known for opposing slavery and advocating free soil politics before the war
The Blair family opposed extension of slavery to the territories and supported colonization of slaves both before and after the war. They were not embraced by most of the abolutionist movement.
 
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The Blair family opposed extension of slavery to the territories and supported colonization of slaves both before and after the war. They were not embraced by most of the abolutionist movement.
Supporting colonization doesn't change one was anti slavery, the same was true of Lincoln.
 
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Supporting colonization doesn't change one was anti slavery, the same was true of Lincoln.
Blair was opposed to expansion of slavery to the territories and supported the colonization movement. At the same time, he owned slaves at the start of the war and disagreed strongly with Freemont when he tried to unilaterally emancipate slaves in Missouri. It was a complex time.
 
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Blair was opposed to expansion of slavery to the territories and supported the colonization movement. At the same time, he owned slaves at the start of the war and disagreed strongly with Freemont when he tried to unilaterally emancipate slaves in Missouri. It was a complex time.
Blair opposed Fremont for the same reason he opposed Harney, then Lyon......he wanted the job himself.
 
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