Golden Thread A photo of your favorite Civil War treasure or display

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captaindrew

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Aug 15, 2019
John, I agree, I love reading CW letters. What was the name of the individual with the 111th?
Ok then...here, ya go. My Great Grandfather, John N. Boyer lived in Hunterstown (suburbs of Gettysburg) and enlisted in the 184th Regiment, PA Volunteers with other locals in 1864. He had only two children at the time. John N. was shot by a Confederate sharpshooter and left on the field as dead, overnite. He didn't die and later had four more children. My grandmother was his last child. (so, I wouldn't be writing this had he actually died :>). My dad, receiving as a legacy John N's Civil War letters from his mother painstakingly typed the 15 or so hand written letters into his computer. I later saved his Apple II text into a P.C. in the form it now exists.

John Nickolaus Boyer served in the Army of the Potomac as a 1st Lieutenant for only a period of six months. He was about 32 yrs old when he enlisted with a company of local (Adam's county, PA) boys. Prior to this, John lived on his farm with his wife Anna, and two children, little Anna, 6 and Willie (William). Probably due to his age, and maturity John was elected 1st Lieutenant. He was shot through the chest Sep. 27, 1864, during the siege of Petersburg, only ten days after enlisting. Although he recovered sufficiently to return to his company during the winter months, John continues to be incapacitated by the effects of his wound (collapsed lung). Being an honorable man and extremely patriotic, he feels it his "duty" to remain with his company. Among the many things to note are: the speed of troop ships in letter-2, the first sign of peace in letter-9, warning concerning traitors at his home in letter-13, an uncomplimentary photo remark in letter-14, an apology to his wife in letter-15, and the amount of John's pension in the letter from the Department of the Interior.
 

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TNBandit

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Joined
Jan 26, 2020
I can't even begin to compete but here are some of mine. The document in the center is an original bill of sale for a slave named Jacob from 1848. I no longer have the wicker wheelchair but it was reported to have come from a Civil War hospital. The rifle is an original 1858 Tower marked Enfield. And the cross stitch was made by my mother and won several awards at State fairs.
Civil War display table.JPG
Wicker Wheelchair.JPG
1853 Enfield.JPG
Mom's Civil War cross stitch.JPG
 
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Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Ok then...here, ya go. My Great Grandfather, John N. Boyer lived in Hunterstown (suburbs of Gettysburg) and enlisted in the 184th Regiment, PA Volunteers with other locals in 1864. He had only two children at the time. John N. was shot by a Confederate sharpshooter and left on the field as dead, overnite. He didn't die and later had four more children. My grandmother was his last child. (so, I wouldn't be writing this had he actually died :>). My dad, receiving as a legacy John N's Civil War letters from his mother painstakingly typed the 15 or so hand written letters into his computer. I later saved his Apple II text into a P.C. in the form it now exists.

John Nickolaus Boyer served in the Army of the Potomac as a 1st Lieutenant for only a period of six months. He was about 32 yrs old when he enlisted with a company of local (Adam's county, PA) boys. Prior to this, John lived on his farm with his wife Anna, and two children, little Anna, 6 and Willie (William). Probably due to his age, and maturity John was elected 1st Lieutenant. He was shot through the chest Sep. 27, 1864, during the siege of Petersburg, only ten days after enlisting. Although he recovered sufficiently to return to his company during the winter months, John continues to be incapacitated by the effects of his wound (collapsed lung). Being an honorable man and extremely patriotic, he feels it his "duty" to remain with his company. Among the many things to note are: the speed of troop ships in letter-2, the first sign of peace in letter-9, warning concerning traitors at his home in letter-13, an uncomplimentary photo remark in letter-14, an apology to his wife in letter-15, and the amount of John's pension in the letter from the Department of the Interior.
I was curious that if he was so patriotic why did he wait until 1864 to enlist, so I did a little digging, it appears he previously served in the 57th PA and enlisted on 7/3/63 in an emergency 3 months regiment. He may have also had experience in the 54th PA as there was a John Boyer who fits the age, though this John Boyer has listed Mechanicsburg, PA as his residence in 1862.

Previous experience would explain his Lieutenancy that late in the war.
 
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General Butler

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Nov 16, 2017
View attachment 351822

I just had and idea. Since many are spending more time at home. Why not take a photo of your favorite Civil War treasure or display. Here is mine. Now show us yours. Have a wonderful day.
Looking good. I love displays. Here's one of mine. General Butlers desk, his personal mail bag (in the field) one of several sketches from the era and his frog bank. Stay tuned for
View attachment 351822

I just had and idea. Since many are spending more time at home. Why not take a photo of your favorite Civil War treasure or display. Here is mine. Now show us yours. Have a wonderful day.
Here is part of what I display. I have several walls of original Butler stuff but lets begin with this. Gen"l Butlers field desk (BFB on the top and ID's cubby holes), his personal mail bag (Maj Gen'l BF Butler In the Field), a period sketch of him and of course his famous frog bank. Most of this came from his estate sale held in NH years and years ago.

Butler desk, bag, bank and pencil sketch.jpg
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
OK, on a serious note here are some of my original prized pieces in the collection:

Georgia shell jacket (came out of Georgia), with regulation trousers and Richmond Depot Artillery cap, the cap is from the Richmond Howitzers I'd to a McCarthy. (not all from the same soldier).

Federal Sergeant's Schuylkill Arsenal sack coat, early M1858 forage cap and regulation kersey trousers from the Cincinnati Depot.

Now they go back into the vault......

IMG_4001 (2).JPG
 
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Texas Yank

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Mar 25, 2020
Love the maps. I'm hunting some now for research. It would be so much more convenient to have them on the wall. What are the paintings?
We were in Gettysburg for the 150th and bought a couple Dale Gallon prints. The one between the "Gettysburg Day 2" map is a small collection of three battles - Shiloh, Antietam, & Gettysburg. The one between the Shiloh maps is the Dale Gallon "Iron Brigade at Gettysburg. We're originally from WI so I've always had an interest in the Iron Brigade.
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2018
Great display on a very interesting soldier/surgeon who made important contributions to Civil War medical practices. I have read some of his letters in relation to the field hospital scene at Savage Station depicted in the photograph. Can't recall which book, but now I'll be anxious to purchase the entire collection. My great-grandfather, with Petitt's Battery B of the 1st NY Light Artillery, was wounded less than a 1/2 mile away as part of the II Corps, 1st Division's rear guard support during the withdrawal on June 29. The story of the medical corps and their systematic improvements by the Peninsula Campaign is perhaps underappreciated. Great display and thanks for sharing.
Thank you very much. If you purchase my book I hope you enjoy it. Please consider leaving a quick review or rating on Amazon afterward. Reviews help the book get more exposure on Amazon. Thank you.
 
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captaindrew

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OK, on a serious note here are some of my original prized pieces in the collection:

Georgia shell jacket (came out of Georgia), with regulation trousers and Richmond Depot Artillery cap, the cap is from the Richmond Howitzers I'd to a McCarthy. (not all from the same soldier).

Federal Sergeant's Schuylkill Arsenal sack coat, early M1858 forage cap and regulation kersey trousers from the Cincinnati Depot.

Now they go back into the vault......

View attachment 352311
Could you post some more photos of the Georgia jacket? Thanks in advance, I'm actually thinking of having a Georgia state jacket or frock coat made looking ahead to early war 160th events I'm hoping will be in the near future. Have to make my mind up on fabric and small details.
 

Package4

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Could you post some more photos of the Georgia jacket? Thanks in advance, I'm actually thinking of having a Georgia state jacket or frock coat made looking ahead to early war 160th events I'm hoping will be in the near future. Have to make my mind up on fabric and small details.
I will do so, I have a series of photos of this jacket on a mannequin, keep in mind that this is most likely a commutation jacket, according to Les Jensen. The interior is actually linen, the exterior is wool that was originally a medium gray. Has all federal eagle buttons and fairly high collar, it came out of Georgia with a cotton haversack, but no guarantee that it is a Georgia Jacket.
 
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