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A Peach Is A Peach Is A Vivandiere

Discussion in 'The Ladies Tea' started by JPK Huson 1863, Jul 7, 2015.

  1. rosefiend

    rosefiend First Sergeant

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    So that's why I keep seeing only four women attached to a company (though at the beginning of the war, there could be 17 or more -- until the men went out into the field).

    It's that behind-the-scenes stuff like this that interests me. Thanks for the clipping.
     

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  3. Dave Wilma

    Dave Wilma 2nd Lieutenant

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    I have not done research to see what updates Congress instituted between 1802 and 1861, but I imagine that the tradition of four women per company was kept for a long time. They were pretty cheap auxiliaries. Officers got servants who were entitled to one ration each, but I imagine these were envisioned as males. It would require an almost year-by-year review of Act of Congress to track it more accurately.
     
  4. rosefiend

    rosefiend First Sergeant

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    *brain melts*

    Well, we'll just say that this "four women to a company" thing sounds like a good rule of thumb and leave it at that.
     
  5. Dave Wilma

    Dave Wilma 2nd Lieutenant

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    My hunch is that women in each company devolved from Acts of Congress into Army regulation. In 1802 the Honorable Members measured how much beef and pork and vinegar each ration should consist of. At some point they freed themselves from that level of detail. Feeding the auxiliaries, but not paying them, was a good deal. Laundresses earned money by washing clothes.
     
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  6. LoyaltyOfDogs

    LoyaltyOfDogs Sergeant

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  7. JPK Huson 1863

    JPK Huson 1863 Colonel Forum Host

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    Thanks so much Loyalty of Dogs, awesome, right? I copied it out of the blue box, little easier to read. Wish songs sounded like this now!

    The pride of soldier boys,
    The sharer of their joys,
    When on a summer’s day
    To camp they march away;
    Their mascot’s ever near,
    The jolly vivandiere;
    Young and fair, debonair,
    With a heart that’s free from care.
    And when she taps her keg of ruby wine,
    To “have a smile” the boys cannot decline,
    They clink their glasses with a cheer:
    “Long life to her, our vivandiere!”
    Both high and low, all love her so,
    By old and young her praise is sung.

    REFRAIN:
    For she’s a wonder!
    The boys all ponder
    To whom she’ll give her heart and hand,
    This dearest girl in all the land!
    She is the neatest, completest, sweetest,
    A girl without a peer, the jolly vivandiere!

    But when, in war and strife,
    The soldier risks his life
    For home and country dear,
    You find the vivandiere.
    And in the time of need,
    She is a friend indeed.
    Not afraid is this maid,
    And to dangers pays no heed.
    The cannons roar!
    The drums beat!
    Bugles call!
    And right and left the bravest soldiers fall;
    But with a smile is ever near,
    And with a cheer, the vivandiere!
    Both friend and foe, all love her so,
    By old and young her praise is sung
    .
     
  8. LoyaltyOfDogs

    LoyaltyOfDogs Sergeant

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    You're welcome, JPK, and thank you for the formatting help! Once I had pasted it into the blue box to connect it with the link to your photo, I couldn't figure out how to remove it. (Any technical advice is welcome!)
     
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  9. JPK Huson 1863

    JPK Huson 1863 Colonel Forum Host

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    That happens to me all the bleached-blond time. I usually just scrap the entire thing and start over. :cry:
     
  10. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Another excellent thread. I really like the dolls. It be nice to have one. Great photos too.
     
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  11. JPK Huson 1863

    JPK Huson 1863 Colonel Forum Host

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    Not that she was a ' real ' vivandier- another example where children delighted in dressing up! This is a riot. Someone provided her with child sized cask, shoes, hat- everything! What is not clear ( Pinterest ) is whether she is American or French.

    Hate ' wasting ' old threads. So frequently newer members haven't seen them, seems a good op for a bump, when relevant photos come up.

    viv1crop.jpg
     
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