A Model 1816 Harpers Ferry Flintlock Lamp?!?

bobinwmass

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I've seen a dozen of more of these made from trapdoor springfields, a couple with the breechblock open to accept the electric cord, but most with a hole drilled through the barrel! All of these had the butt cut off flat, so a base could be fastened into the flat wood. At least the guy who made this project shaped those legs / feet and looks like the butt is not cut short.
A slice was taken out of the lower portion of the butt so one foot could be spliced in, keeping the original buttplate. I guess it could have been much worse.

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Tony Z

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If asked, I haven't noticed, so someone has got to say it: Does the lamp work?

If that were mine, I would have it in my office. It would be a top tier conversation piece, starting conversations about the Civil War each time someone saw it. Look at how much interest one could start in our pastime!
 

James N.

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The damage had already been done, now long ago, so no reason not to use it in this fashion. Truth be told, these are far from rare antique firearms - they have simply increased in value due to inflation and perceived demand. (I'm speaking of the model rather than the fact this was done to an unconverted musket still in original flint; too bad it wasn't a conversion piece instead!) And of course you are correct that at the time this was done there was little interest in them, either as antiques or as shooters.
 

Peter Stines

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Gulf Coast of Texas
This might be heracy to some but you can get a repro barrel and bring it back from. the dead. Several sources for 1816 barrels out there. Easy enough to swop out your electrified barrel when you want to shoot it and put back. The last time I saw an original frizzen for a '16 was many, many moons ago and it cost about $125 which was actually not bad. I'll keep my peepers peeled for one. Like another poster said give Lodgewood a try. And the horn seems to have some scrimshaw letters or ??? on it. What are they ? Can you post a pic ? Thanks for sharing.
 

bobinwmass

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Jul 14, 2019
Location
Western Massachusetts
This might be heracy to some but you can get a repro barrel and bring it back from. the dead. Several sources for 1816 barrels out there. Easy enough to swop out your electrified barrel when you want to shoot it and put back. The last time I saw an original frizzen for a '16 was many, many moons ago and it cost about $125 which was actually not bad. I'll keep my peepers peeled for one. Like another poster said give Lodgewood a try. And the horn seems to have some scrimshaw letters or ??? on it. What are they ? Can you post a pic ? Thanks for sharing.
Thanks. I had been checking all 3 recommended places off and on for the past couple years but have yet to score a frizzen or ramrod. I don't plan to shoot it, would prefer to keep all original parts as much as possible, even as a lamp. As for the horn, it is not old. About 30 years ago I took apart a mounted set of old cow horns to make a display for my gun rack. A collector of military buttons at the time, looking for easy designs in my button book, I decided to use the "A&HA" of the Massachusetts Ancient and Honorable Artillery. It was only a few years ago when doing genealogy on my family did I discover that my 10th great grandfather was one of the A&HA's original members in 1638. His son, my 9th great grandfather, was at one time the Company's captain and was killied in 1670 at age 60 in King Phillip's War, leading his company of Roxbury militia across the log bridge in the attack on the Narragansett Indian fort in the Great Swamp Fight. I've always said since then that it must have been those ancestors that steered me to picking that design, and perhaps my interest in Massachusetts militaria.

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Peter Stines

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Thanks. I had been checking all 3 recommended places off and on for the past couple years but have yet to score a frizzen or ramrod. I don't plan to shoot it, would prefer to keep all original parts as much as possible, even as a lamp. As for the horn, it is not old. About 30 years ago I took apart a mounted set of old cow horns to make a display for my gun rack. A collector of military buttons at the time, looking for easy designs in my button book, I decided to use the "A&HA" of the Massachusetts Ancient and Honorable Artillery. It was only a few years ago when doing genealogy on my family did I discover that my 10th great grandfather was one of the A&HA's original members in 1638. His son, my 9th great grandfather, was at one time the Company's captain and was killied in 1670 at age 60 in King Phillip's War, leading his company of Roxbury militia across the log bridge in the attack on the Narragansett Indian fort in the Great Swamp Fight. I've always said since then that it must have been those ancestors that steered me to picking that design, and perhaps my interest in Massachusetts militaria.

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Its still a nice horn. I've horns that were parts of old hat racks. I've bought a few that way and made powder horns. The patina and coloring looks great. FWIW My 1816 is an Evans contract. Rescued it from a junk store for $125 and restored it. My favorite musket and works great.
 

James N.

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Thanks. I had been checking all 3 recommended places off and on for the past couple years but have yet to score a frizzen or ramrod. I don't plan to shoot it, would prefer to keep all original parts as much as possible, even as a lamp. As for the horn, it is not old. About 30 years ago I took apart a mounted set of old cow horns to make a display for my gun rack. A collector of military buttons at the time, looking for easy designs in my button book, I decided to use the "A&HA" of the Massachusetts Ancient and Honorable Artillery. It was only a few years ago when doing genealogy on my family did I discover that my 10th great grandfather was one of the A&HA's original members in 1638. His son, my 9th great grandfather, was at one time the Company's captain and was killied in 1670 at age 60 in King Phillip's War, leading his company of Roxbury militia across the log bridge in the attack on the Narragansett Indian fort in the Great Swamp Fight. I've always said since then that it must have been those ancestors that steered me to picking that design, and perhaps my interest in Massachusetts militaria.
Been there; done that! Though getting there entailed quite a walk through the National Forest surrounding the site:

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James N.

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As did I on the 340th anniversary of his death. Very eerie being alone on that spot in the woods on the anniversary of so much death, including an ancestor. Just felt like a lot of unseen eyes were watching me.

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This is another related site I found on my way there - unfortunately, I forget exactly where. Supposedly it marks the grave of those wounded in the fight that died later on the return trip.

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toot

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Jan 21, 2021
I believe that the captain was also buried with his men, I believe his name was, CAPTAIN GALLOP?
 

bobinwmass

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Jul 14, 2019
Location
Western Massachusetts
I believe that the captain was also buried with his men, I believe his name was, CAPTAIN GALLOP?
If I remember correctly, 7 of the 10 militia captains were killed. My ancestor was Captain Isaac Johnson (my mother's maiden name). Apparently they began taking his body home but later buried him somewhere around Tiverton RI.
 
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