A few cool photos, one of a 3rd Lt

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Custers Luck

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These are soooooooo cool!!! I love the dog photo, really different indeed!!!
 
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Great

Great photos ! I've several North Carolina Confederates in my family tree.

Jesse L. Furguson

Residence Bertie County NC;
Enlisted on 9/16/1861 at Camp Carolina as a Sergeant.

On 9/16/1861 he mustered into "C" Co. NC 32nd Infantry
(date and method of discharge not given)


He was listed as:
* Wounded 4/2/1865 Near Petersburg, VA
* Hospitalized 4/8/1865 Danville, VA (No further record)


Promotions:
* 3rd Lieut 7/5/1862


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- North Carolina Troops 1861-65, A Roster
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com

..................................................................................................................

Gettysburg after battle report:

Report of Col. E. C. Brabble, Thirty-second North Carolina Infantry.

Darkesville, W. Va.,
July 19, 1863.
Capt.: I would respectfully report the part taken by the Thirty-second
Regt. North Carolina troops in the action of July 1, 2,
and 3, at Gettysburg, Pa.

On the first day, about 2.30 p.m., the regiment was drawn up on
the right of the brigade, and, advancing, met, the enemy about 4
o'clock. At the time the regiment became actively engaged, it was
near a railroad cut, the right supported by a regiment of Davis' brigade.
Beyond the cut was a large stone barn, where the enemy was
strongly posted. He had also planted upon a wooded hill between
us and town a battery, which thoroughly commanded the ground in
our front and about the barn.

The brigade made an advance to dislodge him from the barn, but
the cut in front of the other regiments was too difficult for them to
cross, and the Thirty-second fell back for want of support.

After a short time, this regiment charged up to the barn, and dislodged
the enemy; but, being unsupported on the right and left, and
the battery on the hill opening a terrific fire upon it, it again fell
back near the cut. The rest of the brigade having now changed
direction, so as to advance without hinderance, the Thirty-second
moved up beyond the barn, and, waiting a few minutes for the troops
on the right, advanced near the edge of town, where it joined the
other regiments and rested for the night. In its advance it took a
considerable number of prisoners; how many I did not stop to ascertain.
Its loss during the day was 78--none of them as prisoners.

The second day, the Thirty-second was posted behind the theological
seminary, as a part of the support to our batteries. It sustained
a very heavy fire from the enemy's artillery, and lost many men.

The third day, the regiment, with the rest of the brigade, moved
to the left and front, to the northeast of Gettysburg, and, being drawn
up in line, advanced to the foot of--hill, upon which the enemy
was posted. It here sustained a very galling fire from artillery and
sharpshooters, losing many men and doing little injury to the enemy.
Then, in pursuance of orders, it moved farther to the left, and
formed on the right of the Forty-third Regt. North Carolina
troops, to hold an intrenchment that had been captured. It here
lost several men, but, having the enemy at advantage, it did good
execution upon him. From this position, it fell back, by orders,
about 5 p. m., and a little before midnight it withdrew with the rest
of the troops to the range of hills west of Gettysburg.

During the engagement, the conduct of the regiment was all I
could desire, there being very little time during the three days when
it was not perfectly under my control. Both officers and men, with
scarcely an exception, did their duty faithfully and unflinchingly.
Where all behaved so well, it is difficult to discriminate, yet justice
requires that I should mention Capt. William L. London. To his
skill and gallantry is greatly due whatever of service the regiment
may have rendered in the battle.

During the three days' fighting, the regiment lost in killed and
wounded 147 officers and men. Of the 14 reported missing, 2 have
since joined the regiment, and 2 others have been heard from, and
are not in the enemy's hands.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. C. BRABBLE,
Col., Comdg. Regt.

Capt. W. M. Hammond,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Daniel's Brigade.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 27. Part II. Reports. Serial No. 44

***********************************************************************************
 
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TerryB

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I think the guy in the poncho was one of those "illustration" style, not necessarily a "hey, Mom, I'm a soldier!" pics. But, the story goes, re officers and rifles, that Col. William Shy was using one when he was killed at the hill that has ever since borne his name.
 
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major bill

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The soldier in the poncho is part of the never published Quartermaster Manual of 1865. Well I should not say never published as the entire manual has been discovered and was published a couple of years ago. If you are a uniform geek or interested in the details of things like CW era Army wagons or such, you might want to look at this manual.
 

yankee hoorah

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I think the guy in the poncho was one of those "illustration" style, not necessarily a "hey, Mom, I'm a soldier!" pics. But, the story goes, re officers and rifles, that Col. William Shy was using one when he was killed at the hill that has ever since borne his name.
These iron knuckles were found near Shy hill
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James N.

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A lieutenant with a rifle?
Yeah, that one there bothered me, as much as it did in Gods and Gnereals.
( Lt. Thomas Chamberlin at Fredericksburg )
Look closely at "3rd Lt. Jesse Furgurson"'s sleeves - he seems to have chevrons! I suspect this is either: 1) a typo and he was really a sergeant rather than a lt.; or 2) this photo shows him before he was promoted to lt. The dubious spelling of his last name suggests there *may* be misteaks in this!
 
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Why would you spend the money to have your likeness made while wearing a poncho??...I'll answer that by saying: I agree, that likeness was taken for illustrative purposes!!
Personally, I like the pic with the dog....Notice how "tight" he is holding the dog, in order to keep the dog still enough for the photographic exposure!!
 

frontrank2

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It appears to me that the image of the soldier in the poncho is at " secure arms." That is when the musket is held under the arm, with the barrel pointing down and the hammer and nipple flipped over, also pointing down. I believe it was used primarily during rainy weather to keep out moisture. The position of the feet look puzzling, I believe they should be in a
" T "
 
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James N.

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The soldier in the poncho is part of the never published Quartermaster Manual of 1865. Well I should not say never published as the entire manual has been discovered and was published a couple of years ago. If you are a uniform geek or interested in the details of things like CW era Army wagons or such, you might want to look at this manual.
Why would you spend the money to have your likeness made while wearing a poncho??...I'll answer that by saying: I agree, that likeness was taken for illustrative purposes!!
It appears to me that the image of the soldier in the poncho is at " secure arms." That is when the musket is held under the arm, with the barrel pointing down and the hammer and nipple flipped over, also pointing down. I believe it was used primarily during rainy weather to keep out moisture. The position of the feet look puzzling, I believe they should be in a " T "
As noted above ( but not explained in full ) by major bill, this man is almost surely NOT a soldier - he was either merely a model, or more likely an employee of the Quartermaster's Department. I have a booklet containing all of these plates ( printed more than "a couple of years ago" in the 1970's or early 1980's ), each one showing the same man in a different ( in some cases only slightly different ) uniform or combination, from full-dress to fatigue wear, complete with arms and accouterments for infantry, cavalry, artillery, engineers, and even hospital steward. It's thought they were produced to be re-produced to accompany contracts let to the manufacturers or suppliers of items of uniform and equipment to show exactly how they were to be worn and what they were supposed to look like. There are some small errors in a couple of the plates and it's to be expected that this man might not've known the correct positions, though he looks very convincing in most of them.
 

major bill

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James N is correct in that the photographs are well known and have appear in many books and such. Most of the written parts of the Quartermaster Manual of 1865 was only found a few years ago. The written part gives detailed descriptions for various items.
 

yankee hoorah

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James N is correct in that the photographs are well known and have appear in many books and such. Most of the written parts of the Quartermaster Manual of 1865 was only found a few years ago. The written part gives detailed descriptions for various items.
It was sort of like our magizine photos for today, but some random person dressed as a soldier ?
I'm guessing that this manuel was originally written late in the war for Union military to follow as in the form of clothing.
Sort of like what we have today, Exept those thick books are more about training, am I right Bill ?
 
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