A family connected by blood, yet separated by conflict

SWMODave

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#1
mcintoshfamily.jpg

If you spend anytime in McIntosh County, Georgia, and especially the town of Darien, you might hear about the Scottish Highlanders immigrant John Mohr McIntosh. Darien, Georgia is known by Civil War enthusiasts as the town burnt in the movie Glory by Union forces that included troops from the 54th Massachusetts. Amongst John’s descendants that fought in the Revolutionary War, was his grandson James Simons McIntosh (center photo). A career soldier, James would enter the Army in 1812, where he would be seriously wounded in 1813. He served in the Creek War, and was breveted a colonel in the War with Mexico. Later in the conflict with Mexico, he would be killed leading his troops at Molino del Rey on September 8, 1847. His remains were returned to, and interred at Savannah, Georgia.

While a captain stationed at Fort Brooke near Tampa, FL, James would father James McQueen McIntosh, born in 1828 (photo left), and John Baillie McIntosh (photo right), born 1829. With their father being career military until his death, and their grandfather having been a colonel in the Revolutionary War and a General of militia in the War of 1812, service in the military was nearly a given for both boys. James McQueen would receive an appointment to West Point and graduate last in the class of 1849. John Baillie, unable to attend West Point due to a policy that brothers could not attend at the same time, would serve as a midshipmen on the USS Saratoga during the Mexican War, but resigned in 1850 and entered private business in New Jersey.

James was still in the military, stationed at Fort Smith, Arkansas, when southern states began to secede. He resigned from the US Army and offered his services to the Confederate government. He would lead the 2nd Arkansas Mounted Rifles at the Battle of Wilson’s Creek on August 10, 1861, and was promoted to General in January 1862, after leading a successful raid on Union sympathizing Creek and Seminole Indians in what is now Osage County, Oklahoma. Two months later and only 15 minutes after assuming command of the division General Ben McCulloch was leading when he was killed, James McQueen McIntosh would also fall at the Battle of Pea Ridge. Today, he rests in the Fort Smith National Cemetery.

John Baillie chose to fight for the Union when the war broke out, and would serve with various cavalry units in the Eastern Theatre, eventually rising to the rank of Brigadier General. John was probably best known for leading a flanking attack on Wade Hampton on July 3, 1863, although those studying cavalry movements in the Eastern Theatre, will likely come across exploits led by McIntosh in multiple battles. At the Third Battle of Winchester, he would be seriously wounded and lose a leg. John would retire from the US Army in 1870. He died in 1888, and rests in the Elmwood Cemetery, in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

A family connected by blood, yet separated by conflict. Born into military families, all would serve in American wars, two paying the ultimate price, the third sacrificing part of his body in combat. One dying in a foreign country, one dying in rebellion, and one having served, dying with the country finally at peace.

James Horner - Burning the town of Darien from Glory Soundtrack
Darien, Georgia Walking Tour (mostly post war history)
 

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#3
If you spend anytime in McIntosh County, Georgia, and especially the town of Darien, you might hear about the Scottish Highlanders immigrant John Mohr McIntosh. Darien, Georgia is known by Civil War enthusiasts as the town burnt in the movie Glory by Union forces that included troops from the 54th Massachusetts. Amongst John’s descendants that fought in the Revolutionary War, was his grandson James Simons McIntosh (center photo). A career soldier, James would enter the Army in 1812, where he would be seriously wounded in 1813. He served in the Creek War, and was breveted a colonel in the War with Mexico. Later in the conflict with Mexico, he would be killed leading his troops at Molino del Rey on September 8, 1847. His remains were returned to, and interred at Savannah, Georgia.

While a captain stationed at Fort Brooke near Tampa, FL, James would father James McQueen McIntosh, born in 1828 (photo left), and John Baillie McIntosh (photo right), born 1829. With their father being career military until his death, and their grandfather having been a colonel in the Revolutionary War and a General of militia in the War of 1812, service in the military was nearly a given for both boys. James McQueen would receive an appointment to West Point and graduate last in the class of 1849. John Baillie, unable to attend West Point due to a policy that brothers could not attend at the same time, would serve as a midshipmen on the USS Saratoga during the Mexican War, but resigned in 1850 and entered private business in New Jersey.

James was still in the military, stationed at Fort Smith, Arkansas, when southern states began to secede. He resigned from the US Army and offered his services to the Confederate government. He would lead the 2nd Arkansas Mounted Rifles at the Battle of Wilson’s Creek on August 10, 1861, and was promoted to General in January 1862, after leading a successful raid on Union sympathizing Creek and Seminole Indians in what is now Osage County, Oklahoma. Two months later and only 15 minutes after assuming command of the division General Ben McCulloch was leading when he was killed, James McQueen McIntosh would also fall at the Battle of Pea Ridge. Today, he rests in the Fort Smith National Cemetery.

John Baillie chose to fight for the Union when the war broke out, and would serve with various cavalry units in the Eastern Theatre, eventually rising to the rank of Brigadier General. John was probably best known for leading a flanking attack on Wade Hampton on July 3, 1863, although those studying cavalry movements in the Eastern Theatre, will likely come across exploits led by McIntosh in multiple battles. At the Third Battle of Winchester, he would be seriously wounded and lose a leg. John would retire from the US Army in 1870. He died in 1888, and rests in the Elmwood Cemetery, in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

A family connected by blood, yet separated by conflict. Born into military families, all would serve in American wars, two paying the ultimate price, the third sacrificing part of his body in combat. One dying in a foreign country, one dying in rebellion, and one having served, dying with the country finally at peace.

James Horner - Burning the town of Darien from Glory Soundtrack
Darien, Georgia Walking Tour (mostly post war history)
John Baillie McIntosh is worthy of a statue, to be sure, for his sterling patriotism and for his superlative work on the East Cavalry Field.
 
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donna

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#5
Very interesting thread. I always think of all the Kentucky families that were divided, in particular, the Crittenden and Breckinridge families. Each had brothers and uncles and cousins divided as to Union and Confederacy. I also think of my own ancestors who fought on both sides and from same family.
 



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