A famed war artist with Army of the Cumberland staff

The intrepid and talented war artist Theodore R. Davis (1840-1894) dangled his legs over the edge of the iconic outcropping of rock on Lookout Mountain in Tennessee at some point after the Confederate siege of Chattanooga ended on Nov. 25, 1863. Seated behind Davis are staff officers from the Union Army of the Cumberland, including, from left to right, Capt. Henry Stone of the 1st Wisconsin Infantry, Maj. Gates P. Thruston of the 1st Ohio Infantry, Col. Joseph W. Burke of the 10th Ohio Infantry, Capt. Hunter Brook of the 2nd Minnesota Infantry, an unidentified officer and Maj. Charles S. Cotter of the 1st Ohio Light Artillery. Davis’ numerous sketches in Harper’s Weekly include this November 1863 engraving of the mountain upon which he is seated.

Carte de visite attributed to Robert M. and James B. Linn of Chattanooga, Tenn. Steven Karnes collection.

This image was first published in the Spring 2016 issue of Military Images magazine.

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lelliott19

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The intrepid and talented war artist Theodore R. Davis (1840-1894) dangled his legs over the edge of the iconic outcropping of rock on Lookout Mountain in Tennessee at some point after the Confederate siege of Chattanooga ended on Nov. 25, 1863. Seated behind Davis are staff officers from the Union Army of the Cumberland, including, from left to right, Capt. Henry Stone of the 1st Wisconsin Infantry, Maj. Gates P. Thruston of the 1st Ohio Infantry, Col. Joseph W. Burke of the 10th Ohio Infantry, Capt. Hunter Brook of the 2nd Minnesota Infantry, an unidentified officer and Maj. Charles S. Cotter of the 1st Ohio Light Artillery. Davis’ numerous sketches in Harper’s Weekly include this November 1863 engraving of the mountain upon which he is seated.

Carte de visite attributed to Robert M. and James B. Linn of Chattanooga, Tenn. Steven Karnes collection.

This image was first published in the Spring 2016 issue of Military Images magazine.
Outstanding image! Thank you so much for sharing it -- and the story of artist, Theodore Davis. I love period Civil War images, but it's the stories behind them that are truly fascinating. Thanks again for sharing this one with us!
 

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