Golden Thread 75 Years are gone, but Old Men will Remember

BlueandGrayl

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About the presence of Black Confederate veterans like the one you just mentioned it doesn't mean they had full combat role in the Confederate Army but they did have a alright relationship with their white masters.

Blacks both Union and Confederate (though the latter didn't actually fight but we're connected nonetheless) were at Civil War reunions
 

John Hartwell

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Central Massachusetts
I knew he was alive at the time, but wasn't until this year did I find out he had attended. For some reason I assumed that only participants of the battle were at the reunion, wasn't till I read his article that all living veterans from the war were allowed to attend.

My GG G-Pa (57th IN) holding the flag.

View attachment 212770
What was his name? Where did he live? I just might be able to find more about him.
 
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Location
North Florida
What was his name? Where did he live? I just might be able to find more about him.


I purposely left the names out on the above image, I've documented my GG G-Pa and at some point will have a thread on him in the My Civil War Ancestry. I greatly appreciate the offer.

Funny thing about him, his father was a shoemaker by trade in Cincinnati, Ohio (where my GG G-Pa was born) and in Indiana. After the war my GG G-Pa tried farming in Indiana and Iowa, but eventually became a electrician in Colorado Springs (same time Nikola Tesla was there), he passed away in 1943 at the age of 97. He supposedly joined the 57th as a drummer boy at 15, of course a month later he turned 16 and celebrated his 18th birthday at the Battle of Missionary Ridge. I doubt he met Tesla, but who knows?
 

John Hartwell

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Central Massachusetts
It's probably asking a lot, was there a list made of those who attended? Boy could that keep us busy for awhile.
Bob Velke beat me to it! His is the "corrected" version. The official list is also in Paul L. Roy's The Last Reunion of the Blue and Gray, where they are arranged by state, so it might be easier to find attendees from a particular locality or veterans' post/camp.

And, there are lots and lots of photographs -- unfortunately relatively few have names attached to them. I hoped to keep this photo-based, as far as selection of men to profile is concerned. But, I'm working on some now with just names and 1938 residences to go on -- finding a few photos that way -- and some really interesting stories.
 

John Hartwell

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Central Massachusetts
It may seem surprising that the two states that sent the most veterans to the Last Reunion of the Blue and Gray at Gettysburg in 1938 were California (150) and Texas (130), whose representatives had to travel particularly long distances. Pennsylvania, the “home state,” so to speak, of the reunion, was third, with 115 veterans. Of those from the Lone Star State, all but thirteen were former Confederates. So, almost a quarter of the 486 Confederate veterans present were Texans.

At 1:30 pm, on June 24th, a Santa Fe Railroad train pulled out of Lubbock, Texas, carrying nine West Texas veterans and their chosen assistants. They were bound for Gettysburg, via Amarillo, Omaha, and Chicago. Many other veterans would join them en route. Prominent among those first nine was Will Dorsey Crump (commonly called “W.D.” or “Judge Crump”).
CrumpA1.JPG
W, D. Crump​

Will Dorsey Crump was a native of Louisville, Ky., born on August 24, 1844. Early in March, 1863, at the age of 18, he had enlisted in Co. C, 3rd Kentucky Cavalry (CSA), in the command of John Hunt Morgan. That Summer, Morgan led a force of 2,500 hand-picked men on his famous rad into Federal territory. Assigned scouting duties, Crump was frequently involved in skirmishes. Once he was reported killed. But, on August 21st, his and about 60 of his comrades' luck ran out:

We were scattered and were going east. We were looking for a favorable place to ford the Ohio river. We knew it was fordable near Buffington Island. We started down toward the river. There was a rail fence there and we knew we had to take down a part of the fence to get over. We planned to swim across. Just about the time some of the boys started to take down some of the rails, federal soldiers came along and we were captured.”(1)

Young Crump and other enlisted men were taken to Camp Douglas, near Chicago, where they spent 19 months as prisoners of war. Until, on March 1, 1865, a group of 500 men, including Crump, were taken from Camp Douglas to Washington, to be sent to Virginia for exchange

We were never exchanged. The war ended shortly after that, so we started homeward. We walked mostly, riding part of the way.(1)

In Western Virginia, Crump with a few companions stopped a while, seeking work to get some travelling funds.

We didn’t do much work. The man owned a sawmill and a gristmill. My father had once owned a sawmill, and I thought I knew how. I ran it and sawed some lumber for a fence we built around the garden. The woman of the house had a trucking comb, which was broken. I found a piece of horn and made her a new one, which she prized highly. She fed us well.(1)

Moving on, the men hopped a freight train which took them 18 miles in 10 hours. They decided walking was faster. Later still, Crump met a railroad man he knew, and borrowed enough from him to ride the rest of the way home.

But, the war had left Will Crump a restless young man. In 1867 he started west. Fist by boat to Omaha. From there he moved on to Cheyenne and Denver, stopping for a time at each place, living the life of the cowboy. Finally, in 1874, he settled in Dallas. There he married, and stayed until 1890, when he took his family to West Texas. He purchased a place three miles northwest of where Lubbock now stands. There was no town there then.

W. D. Crump became a cattle rancher, a leading citizen and active promoter of the new town. In 1898 he was elected County Judge and served two terms. With the town spreading out, he took a ranch some miles outside of Shallowater in 1900. In 1917 he retired, and moved into that town.

By 1935, Will Dorsey Crump was Lubbock County’s last living Confederate veteran. When he learned of the planned Gettysburg Reunion,

“Judge” Crump, as he is best known, is all excited over the trip. He had planned to make it in a car with his son and daughter … when Uncle Sam turned thumbs down on the car trip. A government official explained he [was] to old to make the car trip, and that he would stand a train trip better.(1)

Crump foresaw no difficulty with the drive, just a couple of years earlier he had driven almost as far to a Confederate reunion. But, reluctantly, he agreed, since the Federal Government was paying all expenses for him and a companion. He had a grand old time at Gettysburg, and by all accounts his son, Bob, did, too. Met a couple of old friends, and shared a lot of memories.

In August, 1939, on his 95th birthday, Judge Crump reminisced that during his two terms as County Judge he had tried only 25 cases. Though he still remembered a fight that occurred during one of his sessions: “when people were bad they were pretty bad, but not often."

"The people then were trustworthy," he said. He recounted how storekeepers would leave their stores open while they were on trips, and how cowhands would enter the store, choose the merchandise they wanted, and leave the money behind the canned goods.

"What is wrong with civilization?" This 95-year-old man claims that the funny papers that are distributed in the newspapers are a menace to the youngsters' character, and "I never have seen anything funny about them!"(2)
Will Dorsey Trump passed away on January 15, 1940, at the age of 95 years. He was eulogized for his accomplishments, but also because
“He was a very kind person, and he enjoyed people a lot. He was very respectable and respectful of other people - just a good friend to lots of people, young and old. He lived to be 95, and we had a birthday party every year. People from all over the county came for his birthday. For his exercise, there was a long sidewalk in front of the house, and he would walk that and tell us (children) stories ... and he would keep candy, too.”(3)




(1) Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, June 26, 1938
(2) Fort Worth Star, August 21, 1939
(3) Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, January 30, 1940
See also: https://www.lubbockonline.com/life/2010-06-07/crump-helped-build-lubbock-shallowater
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
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Location
Central Pennsylvania
He's a wonderful addition to the thread, wouldn't you love to have met him? Just occurred to me, the elderly vets around when I was a child had served in WWI. They really did not speak of it much- generally also had candy though.

Bob Velke beat me to it! His is the "corrected" version. The official list is also in Paul L. Roy's The Last Reunion of the Blue and Gray, where they are arranged by state, so it might be easier to find attendees from a particular locality or veterans' post/camp.


Thank you! Hope to find more leads- what an astonishing project, holy heck. 40,000 came, is that right? Can't imagine the research ( and organization, which always impresses me, having exactly no ability to organize 2 paper bags into a pile ). Would like to know if some relatives made the trip- took forever just to track down which GAR post they joined. Can not find where records from those posts may be.
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Location
Central Pennsylvania
D.G. Maggard's story from Houston- ( sorry, 1913 reunion, ran into it ) think we already mentioned all the fundraising in Texas, to send vets to Gettysburg that year? Houston paper had those printed ballots, readers could vote vets into open spots on the trip. Fair warning, if you check it out you'll be there for a week. Stories are too, too good. Veterans wrote the paper, to be nominated.

vets houston.JPG

Co. K, 13th Mississippi, Longstreet's Corps

vets houston doc 1.JPG vets houston doc 2.JPG

Forts Douglas and Delware, where Gen. Schofield took a liking to him because he was only a kid but swore a blue streak over taking the oath ( he didn't ), Schofield made him an orderly at the hospital.

vets houston doc pic.JPG
 
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John Hartwell

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Central Massachusetts
He's a wonderful addition to the thread, wouldn't you love to have met him? Just occurred to me, the elderly vets around when I was a child had served in WWI. They really did not speak of it much- generally also had candy though.
It has been noted that a great many men are reluctant to speak of their wartime experiences. It takes time. Generally, it's about fifty years afterwards that the real, detailed stories begin to come out. Fifty years after WWI was 1968 ... a time when few people were interested in listening to war stories. Many, many stories of the Great War are lost to us.

j
 

John Hartwell

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Central Massachusetts
William H. ("Uncle Billy") Turner:
whturner3.jpg
The above photo of 93-year-old William H. (Uncle Billy) Turner made the front pages of newspapers across the country the first week in July, 1938. It appears to be the only photo of him at the Last Reunion of the Blue and the Gray we have. The caption to the photo, repeated verbatim just about everywhere ran
“W. H. Turner, as a Union soldier he waved a sword. After the Civil War he began swallowing them for a living as a circus performér. Now, at 93, he is attending the 75th anniversary reunion of the Battle of Gettysburg, and entertaining his old buddies with his tricks, as pictured above.”
William Henry Turner was born in upstate New York on February 20, 1845. He served in the 2nd Connecticut Heavy Artillery. The Nutmeg State CSRs not yet being online, I have not been able to find his particulars. The unit was formed in the fall of 1863, as the 19th Conn. Infantry. Reorganized in January 1864 as the 2nd Conn. H.A., the regiment was assigned to the defenses of Washington, South of the Potomac. But, only 4 months later, were ordered into the field with the Army of the Potomac, to serve as infantry. Engaged heavily at Spottsylvania, Cold, Harbor, and Petersburg; later under Sheridan in the Valley. Ending the war back with the AoP, at Appomattox.

But, by that time, William H. Turner was no longer with the 2nd CtHA. At some point in that service, we find him “transferred to the 19th Veterans Reserve Corps” (Co. E). The regimental history says nothing further about him. At some point he lost his left arm -- presumably during the war, but the regimental history makes no mention of his wounding. Yet, he was judged sufficiently capable of service to be inducted into the VRC. That's unusual. Perhaps he lost his arm by a postwar accident, or complication to a wartime injury? Access to more complete records will doubtless clear it up. He was granted a pension in 1887.

Following the war, W. H. Turner goes West, at least as far as Lebanon, Missouri, where we find him in December 1882, elected as Adjutant at the formation of George G. Meade Post #48. He would remain active in the G.A.R. all his life, and eventually served as Vice-Chairman of the Department of Missouri. He would also stay in Lebanon for the rest of his days, serving many years as Laclede County Recorder, and as an elected judge. Ultimately, he would be its last surviving member. William H. Turner remained active in the G.A.R. all his life, and eventually served as Vice-Chairman of the Department of Missouri.
trnrr.jpg
W.H. Turner in his office as Laclede County Recorder
The story of his sword-swallowing is hard to trace, the sources all being from “oral tradition.” A tribute published at the time of his death in 1941, tells us he “traveled with a medicine show, sold 'Wahoo Indian' medicine and entertained young and old alike with his sword-swallowing” (there doesn’t seem to be any circus involved). And, he later combined his “medical career” with his elected judgeship as well.

Another article printed at the same time, tells us:

“Uncle Billy (W.H.) Turner was, among other things, a medicine man, in that he purchased the rights to a patent medicine which cured, among other things, sciatica, rheumatism, cancer, kidney trouble, etc.
“This medicine consisted of some dry herbs, and, when mixed with water, would be converted into a vile tasting substance.”

[A sure sign that it was good for you!]

“Uncle Billy would make all of the circuit courts … and at that time the circuit court attendance was tremendous. It was at these circuit court meetings that he would sell most of his medicine, which he called ‘Wahoo.’
“ One evening at a political meeting in Sleeper, after Uncle Billy had thrilled the gathering with his feat of sword-swallowing, a gentleman of the neighborhood challenged him on the ground that he didn’t actually swallow the sword. This angered Uncle Billy, and he gulped a cheese sandwich, swallowed it, and talked to the man for a few minutes, then again put the sword down his throat and brought up a piece of the cheese sandwich. This satisfied the person who had challenged Billy in his sword-swallowing act.”
Now, we know for a fact that must be true, because, as the writer, Paul Dillard, affirms: “the forgoing … incidents were told to this writer by Uncle Billy” himself!
As he got older, he tired of continuously travelling the court circuit, and ran for Lebanon Police Court Judge, which he won handily. In 1940, at the age of 95, he announced that he was once again a candidate for re-election, stating that he intended to be a judge until he reached 100, and maybe then consider retirement.

“In making his announcement Judge Turner cited the fact that he is saving the city hundreds of dollars, through his ‘holding court 24 hours a day.’ The judge demands that he be notified when arrests are made and the trial proceed at that time.”
Now that’s speedy justice!

Uncle Billy was duly re-elected that year, but would not be able to achieve his goal of serving until age 100. The tribute first quoted above records:

“On Sunday morning, June 8, 1941, as he sat on his Lebanon porch listening to the choir of the Christian Church across the street. He quietly and peacefully died. The George G. Meade Post of the Grand Army of the Republic had lost its final comrade.
“Uncle Billy left memories that many treasure, it had been said, ‘there has never been or will ever be another like him.’ His creed and his humorous experiences of his life touch many hearts as they remember him.”
His Find-a-grave memorial.
From that are copied the two unattributed clippings (probably June 1942) quoted above.
Lebanon Star, March 16, 1940.
History of the Second connecticut volunteer heavy artillery. Originally the Nineteenth Connecticut vols, T. F. Vaill, (1868)

Uncle Billy has also been inducted into, believe it or not,
 
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John Hartwell

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Location
Central Massachusetts
Edwin Hale Lincoln: Drummer Boy
EHLincoln3.jpg
Edwin H. Lincoln found the Reunion "a constant succession of pleasant surprises."
Edwin Hale Lincoln was only 13 years of age when the war broke out. He, of course, wanted to enlist right away, but his parents were predictably unaccommodating. He begged and he pleaded and used every argument his admittedly very bright young mind could contrive. And, in September, 1862, 9 months after his 14th birthday, his father reluctantly took him from their Cape Cod home the 100 miles to the town of Wenham, Mass. to enlist as a drummer in Company D, 5th Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. He had chosen the regiment carefully. It had been one of the original 90 day regiments mobilized in April 1861, and had seen action at Bull Run; so the 5th had a core of well experienced men that Edwin’s father thought would be better protection for his son than a group of green boys. Besides, this second tour of duty was only for nine months -- far preferable to the three years many other regiments were enlisting for.

The 5th MVM arrived at New Bern, NC, late in October. The following month they participated in an expedition to Williamstown, but encountered no serious opposition. In December they saw their first action during the Goldsboro Expedition.

A highly intelligent and literate boy, young Edwin kept a diary during his nine-month service, as he traveled with his regiment along the coastal regions of North Carolina. he recorded the daily affairs of army life such as drills, mail-call, and the arrival of the paymaster along with the excitement and casualties of war. The diary would be edited by his grandson, Karl Marty, and published in 2006.
Atlantic Hotel.jpg
The Army's General Hospital in Beaufort was the former Atlantic Hotel
And, the young drummer would see a great many of those casualties, though ittle of the fighting that caused them. For in January 1863, he was detached to serve as a nurse at the Army General Hospital, in Beaufort, NC. And, there he would remain for the remainder of his enlistment. He rejoined his regiment at the end of June, just in time to ship back North, for mustering-out on July 3rd.

Following the war, Edwin was fortunate to receive an appointment as Page in the Massachusetts State Legislature. Then, in 1873, he decided to take up photography. It was a “hobby” that would become his life’s work, and earn him worldwide renown.

He started his photographic career in 1876, as a salesman and partner in a photographic business in Brockton, Massachusetts. In 1880, he began photographing the grand estates (“summer cottages” they humbly called them) for their wealthy owners and wooden yachts sailing at Newport, Rhode Island, and elsewhere. He became the first American photographer to make a specialty of house interiors. The business was very lucrative, indeed, but, Edwin wasn’t really happy with it.

He was a lover of nature, above all. He moved to Pittsfield, Mass., high in the Berkshire Hills, and, in 1883, made his first photographs of wildflowers: a handful of fringed gentians his wife had picked during a walk. It was the beginning of his real fame. Over the next 40 years, he would spend much of his time walking the hills, seeking out rare and beautiful wildflowers to photograph (he found 35 different orchid species within twenty miles of his home.] He would sit and wait for hours for just the right combination of light and shadow to fall upon his subject. His photographs were admired among botanical students for both their concise precision and their emotional appeal, and he sold prints and portfolios of his work widely, largely among scholarly institutions. His prints are found in photograph collections and museums around the world, and a dedicated exhibitions are being held somewhere every few years.
lincoln1a.jpg
An original platinum print of E. W, Lincoln's
"Meadow sweet,"
sold recently for $5,000.00
A sensitive naturalist, he was always careful not to destroy his subjects or their habitat. Though he dug up the flowers he photographed, he lovingly nurtured them while in his care and returned them to their natural setting when done. He preferred working in his home studio, where he used an 8-x-10-inch camera and could more easily control the light. All of his photographs are contact prints made directly from his large-format negatives. His “grand opus,” published between 1904 and 1914, was Wild Flowers of New England, four hundred original platinum prints, in eight volumes. It was a very exclusive edition, limited to 50 copies. [In 2011, a complete set was sold at auction for $110,000.]

As the 20th century progressed, Edwin H. Lincoln took a greater and greater interest in the Grand Army of the Republic. He headed his local Post, and, in 1933, was elected Vice Commander of the National Encampment. But, soon all the travelling across the country to regional and national encampments became too much, and he declined election to the Commandery. By 1934, he was the very last member of Pittsfield’s William W. Rockwell Post #125. Each year he went through the formality of electing himself to all the offices of the post. “He said he would never surrender the post charter,” reported the Springfield Republican.

He did make the journey to Gettysburg that summer of the Last Reunion of the Blue and Gray, along with his son, Bernard. He said he found the event “a constant succession of pleasant surprises.” Though he had complained in the past that his legs were getting a bit shaky, he found at Gettysburg “a new lease on life,” and the visit seemed to rejuvenate him.

But, as seems to have so often been the case with the Last Reunion's participants, Edwin Hale Lincoln had but a very short time left. Just a few month later, on October 15, 1938, he alighted from a bus not far from his home, and started across the street, when he was run down by a speeding car. He was rushed to nearby Mercy Hospital, but declared dead barely 10 minutes after he arrived.

___________________
EdwHaleLincolnGbg38.jpg
Springfield Republican, October 16, 1938.
Pittsfield Sun, August 2, 1938.

Drummer Boy: Civil War diary of Edwin Hale Lincoln
More Lincoln photographs at Mutualart
See also: No Record So True
 
Last edited:

Karen Lips

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Location
Waxahachie,Texas
Edwin Hale Lincoln: Drummer Boy
View attachment 293159
Edwin H. Lincoln found the Reunion "a constant succession of pleasant surprises."
Edwin Hale Lincoln was only 13 years of age when the war broke out. He, of course, wanted to enlist right away, but his parents were predictably unaccommodating. He begged and he pleaded and used every argument his admittedly very bright young mind could contrive. And, in September, 1862, 9 months after his 14th birthday, his father reluctantly took him from their Cape Cod home the 100 miles to the town of Wenham, Mass. to enlist as a drummer in Company D, 5th Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. He had chosen the regiment carefully. It had been one of the original 90 day regiments mobilized in April 1861, and had seen action at Bull Run; so the 5th had a core of well experienced men that Edwin’s father thought would be better protection for his son than a group of green boys. Besides, this second tour of duty was only for nine months -- far preferable to the three years many other regiments were enlisting for.

The 5th MVM arrived at New Bern, NC, late in October. The following month they participated in an expedition to Williamstown, but encountered no serious opposition. In December they saw their first action during the Goldsboro Expedition.

A highly intelligent and literate boy, young Edwin kept a diary during his nine-month service, as he traveled with his regiment along the coastal regions of North Carolina. he recorded the daily affairs of army life such as drills, mail-call, and the arrival of the paymaster along with the excitement and casualties of war. The diary would be edited by his grandson, Karl Marty, and published in 2006.
View attachment 293160
The Army's General Hospital in Beaufort was the former Atlantic Hotel
And, the young drummer would see a great many of those casualties, though ittle of the fighting that caused them. For in January 1863, he was detached to serve as a nurse at the Army General Hospital, in Beaufort, NC. And, there he would remain for the remainder of his enlistment. He rejoined his regiment at the end of June, just in time to ship back North, for mustering-out on July 3rd.

Following the war, Edwin was fortunate to receive an appointment as Page in the Massachusetts State Legislature. Then, in 1873, he decided to take up photography. It was a “hobby” that would become his life’s work, and earn him worldwide renown.

He started his photographic career in 1876, as a salesman and partner in a photographic business in Brockton, Massachusetts. In 1880, he began photographing the grand estates (“summer cottages” they humbly called them) for their wealthy owners and wooden yachts sailing at Newport, Rhode Island, and elsewhere. He became the first American photographer to make a specialty of house interiors. The business was very lucrative, indeed, but, Edwin wasn’t really happy with it.

He was a lover of nature, above all. He moved to Pittsfield, Mass., high in the Berkshire Hills, and, in 1883, made his first photographs of wildflowers: a handful of fringed gentians his wife had picked during a walk. It was the beginning of his real fame. Over the next 40 years, he would spend much of his time walking the hills, seeking out rare and beautiful wildflowers to photograph (he found 35 different orchid species within twenty miles of his home.] He would sit and wait for hours for just the right combination of light and shadow to fall upon his subject. His photographs were admired among botanical students for both their concise precision and their emotional appeal, and he sold prints and portfolios of his work widely, largely among scholarly institutions. His prints are found in photograph collections and museums around the world, and a dedicated exhibitions are being held somewhere every few years.
View attachment 293162
An original platinum print of E. W, Lincoln's
"Meadow sweet,"
sold recently for $5,000.00
A sensitive naturalist, he was always careful not to destroy his subjects or their habitat. Though he dug up the flowers he photographed, he lovingly nurtured them while in his care and returned them to their natural setting when done. He preferred working in his home studio, where he used an 8-x-10-inch camera and could more easily control the light. All of his photographs are contact prints made directly from his large-format negatives. His “grand opus,” published between 1904 and 1914, was Wild Flowers of New England, four hundred original platinum prints, in eight volumes. It was a very exclusive edition, limited to 50 copies. [In 2011, a complete set was sold at auction for $110,000.]

As the 20th century progressed, Edwin H. Lincoln took a greater and greater interest in the Grand Army of the Republic. He headed his local Post, and, in 1933, was elected Vice Commander of the National Encampment. But, soon all the travelling across the country to regional and national encampments became too much, and he declined election to the Commandery. By 1934, he was the very last member of Pittsfield’s William W. Rockwell Post #125. Each year he went through the formality of electing himself to all the offices of the post. “He said he would never surrender the post charter,” reported the Springfield Republican.

He did make the journey to Gettysburg that summer of the Last Reunion of the Blue and Gray, along with his son, Bernard. He said he found the event “a constant succession of pleasant surprises.” Though he had complained in the past that his legs were getting a bit shaky, he found at Gettysburg “a new lease on life,” and the visit seemed to rejuvenate him.

But, as seems to have so often been the case with the Last Reunion's participants, Edwin Hale Lincoln had but a very short time left. Just a few month later, on October 15, 1938, he alighted from a bus not far from his home, and started across the street, when he was run down by a speeding car. He was rushed to nearby Mercy Hospital, but declared dead barely 10 minutes after he arrived.

___________________
View attachment 293165
Springfield Republican, October 16, 1938.
Pittsfield Sun, August 2, 1938.

Drummer Boy: Civil War diary of Edwin Hale Lincoln
More Lincoln photographs at Mutualart
See also: No Record So True
How sad the way his life ended.
 

John Hartwell

Major
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Location
Central Massachusetts
How sad the way his life ended.
Looking back over the stories in this thread, we see quite a number of these old men passing within months ... sometimes within days ... of their return from the Reunion. They were very old men, of course, and the excitement of the event would tell on most of them to one degree or another. But, yes, Edwin Hale Lincoln's death was particularly sad, if only because he actually seemed healthier, "rejuvenated" he said, by his Gettysburg visit. And, at 90, he was a relative youngster among the attendees.
EHLincoln2.jpg
Edwin Hale Lincoln with his Five Children, c. 1915
 
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