Discussion 70yr old Confederate Veteran working on a Ga. Chain Gang, seeks Pardon 1907

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Lubliner

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Nov 27, 2018
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Chattanooga, Tennessee
I still don't see 6 month chain gang as a just sentence, though. Not for age and condition.
It really does seem harsh. At further glance, he must have really ruffled the feathers of someone in the community. (I believe it was mentioned on the previous page.) The attitude of breaking a bad habit is severe, and my final worry is if it worked, and if he came out okay from it. I do not think he would maybe forego a money making business if he stayed healthy, so maybe he would stay close to the still and let others sell for him? Those rights he lost while serving the confederacy he would wish to regain in whatever possible ways he could. Were revenuers running rampant in Georgia, Tennessee and Kentucky back in that time?
 

John Hartwell

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Yes, with his wild tale of service that is not verifiable I figure he was a wily old coot that was versed in the art of bargaining and selling. I see the exaggerated motions of Ford holding onto the lapels of Judge Park's coat, saying, "Oh, plleeasse do sumfin for me..." and at the same time feeling for which pocket the billfold is hidden in.
Lubliner.
It's still a sad story, even if it was his own doing -- which we have no way of knowing.
 

OldSarge79

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Pisgah Forest, North Carolina
We never got a moonshine lecture up here in Michigan , but I'm sure some of it was going on .
It was going on a lot, especially in the south. Still is in some parts.
The father of a friend of mine in high school walked with a limp. Runnin' from the revenuers in the 1930's got him shot in the leg. In the end, I knew him as a gentle, loving family man, but I'm sure he must have done his six months on the gang. Hopefully his leg had a chance to heal first.
6 months was kind of a standard chain gang sentence, but it would have been hard physical labor, under unrelenting conditions.
It was probably a standard sentence, but keep in mind that he would have served it under white southern guards. I have little doubt that they had him assigned to something like giving water to the other prisoners every hour, but he wouldn't have been swinging a sledge hammer, not with a history like his.
 

JPChurch

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I met a retired ATF agent down in Wythe County VA (southwest Virginia) a few years ago. He was a Marine veteran of Korea (Chosin Reservoir, one of the lucky ones to survive) that later joined the Treasury depts. ranks of stillbusters. He wrote a book about it and had it published. When you're down that way and get up in the hills, life's a totally different story. You can pass by a rural cemetery just about anywhere in Wythe County and there are Confederate (some National, some the battle) flags in place next to several markers within in each one.

I've had the real McCoy before in Tennessee. Very powerful stuff.
 

Rusk County Avengers

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I've not had any moonshine in years, but let me tell you some of the West Virginia stuff I've had is powerful! Still got a lot of folks here in Texas and over in Louisiana making that stuff. I think the days of Government agents roaming the woods in search of stills is over. Its done become a Southern tradition and hallmark.

As for this old though, I'm suspicious of his story of him in the CW is made up. After all in the early 1900's it wasn't hard for an old man to pass himself off as a Confederate Veteran, and even if he really was it also wouldn't be hard for him to make up some story of extraordinary feats for sympathy.

Heck now all this talk of moonshine, I could go for some! I've not had a hard drink and getting drunk in at least two years. Some other time I guess.
 
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