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6th NY Cavalry - Kicked by a Horse & Killed by a Train

Discussion in 'Medical Care of the Civil War' started by lelliott19, Feb 24, 2017.

  1. lelliott19

    lelliott19 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    upload_2017-2-24_21-52-17.png
    Image from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, published March 14, 1863.

    Private Joseph Osbourne Bivins of Company B, 6th New York Cavalry
    age 32, served as a farrier, shoeing the horses of the regiment. On June 19, 1863, while shoeing a horse, he was kicked in the face by the horse. (I wonder if he was using the technique illustrated above? Seems a likely way to get kicked in the jaw? @EJ Zander )

    He was treated by Regimental Asst Surgeon, S C Sanger, who relates the details: The heel caulk (the projections on the rear of the iron horseshoe) "implunged the anterior aspect of the lower jaw, a little to the right of the symphysis, and drove inward a large portion of the alveolar process to which six teeth were attached." The fragment was "secured in its place by silk cord and silver wire, two small braces made of cork being placed between the movable teeth and the corresponding ones of the upper jaw."

    Less than two months later, Bivins was evidently good as new, and was returned to duty Aug 13, 1863. He rejoined the regiment in camp on August 18, 1863 and was mustered out on September 19, 1864. https://archive.org/stream/medicalsurgical32barnrich#page/648/mode/2up - page 649

    Fast forward 36 years to Jan 17, 1899. Joseph Osbourbe Bivins, age 67, was struck by a an east-bound train at the Main Street crossing at Narrowsburg, NY at about 7 pm January 17, 1899 and "hurled fifteen feet, landing upon the west-bound track....He was carried to his home where he died ten hours later."

    113055661_1411038856.jpg
    https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=113055661
     

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    Last edited: Feb 26, 2017

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  3. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Retired Moderator

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    Poor Joseph Bivins! Shoeing horses is a dangerous occupation... both my dad and granddaddy did it till they were in their 80's and the women of the family made them quit.

    I guess he could have commiserate with Grierson had they ever met.
     
  4. EJ Zander

    EJ Zander First Sergeant

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    Ouch! Wow he took a shot and with a caulk no less. Counting six teeth with my tongue, it is just about the entire side of the jaw bone that was broke!
    And the sketch, what to do when u left the stocks at home,lol.
    upload_2017-4-19_20-53-8.jpeg
    Wonder how that horse in the sketch is going to react when they try to shoe him next time or the time after that?
     
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  5. ucvrelics.com

    ucvrelics.com 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host

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    Why do I keep opening these:frantic: You are the "GIRL" I have never seen a Southerner shoe a horse like this. I'm sure the horse didn't like it either. I can't speak for the train.
     
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  6. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Retired Moderator

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    Actually, it works. My dad had to come help my ex shoe a mare owned by General Shumaker's wife. Someone had messed with her before, probably hurt her, and her feet were in bad shape. Poor Rick went to shoe her before he met me for class at the local Jr. College that night. I was sitting close to the front and heard the door opening in the back part of the lecture hall.... and smelled the distinct odors of dirt, sweat, and horse Agricultural Products. I looked up as he sat down... muddy, bloody, half his shirt torn off....

    When Daddy came, he got her down quickly, they shod her, and it was over. I've seen him do it several times... he was a pro... gentle around them, fast, and petting and talking afterwards.
     
  7. JPK Huson 1863

    JPK Huson 1863 Colonel Forum Host

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    Whoa! ( and sorry.... ) SO happy you jumped in Nate- I'd have thought it a crazy person method otherwise. Been asked to sit down wind most of my life and spent a childhood leaving my barn clothes on the porch- never witnessed this. I'm still " But how.. ? " and " HOLY gee whiz, what?? ". It's such a touchy job, getting nails in that spot- without binding them up. Doing it on an upside down horse- that's a surgeon, not a blacksmith.

    @EJ Zander please tell us you took a long vacation after the last time you pulled this off? Goodness. Seriously, everyone's discussing it like it's normal but simply never bumped into it before. Of course, rubbed elbows mostly with ex-race horses, in the process of being convinced they were hunters. Little neurotic.

    This poor fellow! Survived such hazardous duty ( who knew? ) only to meet his end on the business of another kind of horse. Nice find, Lelliot, thank you for posting it. Too easy to forget no one would have gotten to any of the battles without the blacksmiths.
     
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  8. EJ Zander

    EJ Zander First Sergeant

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    Oh I havent done or even assisted with that technique before. The big guys with foot issues just go into stocks.
    Nate, a tip of the hat to your Dad. How much over the normal rate would have he charged for a job like that?
     
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  9. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Retired Moderator

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    It's been a long time...I do remember the discussion about how much to pay Mrs. Shoemaker, which was considerably over the going rate for one guy and a normal horse. A general's wife; and I suspect the general was on her about not taking good care of that mare!
     
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