6th Florida Infantry Regiment

bdtex

Major General
★★ Sr. Moderator
Silver Patron
Annual Winner
Regtl. Quartermaster Chickamauga 2018 Vicksburg 2019
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Location
Texas
Posting this just to get it started and hoping others have information. I have a personal interest in this Regiment. I have obtained the Regimental History from the Texas Heritage Museum at Hill College. I have read this book:

6th FLA.jpg

6th Regiment, Florida Infantry
OVERVIEW:
6th Infantry Regiment, organized at Chattahoochee, Florida, in March, 1862, contained men from Gadsden, Jackson, Union, Collier, and Washington counties. During April the unit had 31 officers and 511 men, and soon moved to East Tennessee. Later it was assigned to Colonel R.C. Trigg's, and General Finley's and J.A. Smith's Brigade, Army of Tennessee. It served on many battlefields from Chickamauga to Atlanta, was active in Tennessee with Hoods, and ended the war in North Carolina. This regiment reported 35 killed and 130 wounded at Chickamauga and in December, 1863, totalled 214 men and 133 arms. Only a remnant surrendered in April, 1863. The field officers were Colonels Jesse J. Finley, Daniel L. Kenan, and Angus D. McLean, and Lieutenant Colonel Robert H.M. Davidson.


https://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-battle-units-detail.htm?battleUnitCode=CFL0006RI

This thread is intended to serve as the location for general regimental history, photographs, stories, articles and any other relevant information about the 6th Florida Infantry Regiment. Please do not start new threads - just add your content about the regiment under this existing thread so others can easily find it. Thank you so much for contributing information for this regiment.
 

bdtex

Major General
★★ Sr. Moderator
Silver Patron
Annual Winner
Regtl. Quartermaster Chickamauga 2018 Vicksburg 2019
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Location
Texas

bdtex

Major General
★★ Sr. Moderator
Silver Patron
Annual Winner
Regtl. Quartermaster Chickamauga 2018 Vicksburg 2019
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Location
Texas
This forum needs some action.

My ancestor from Co. I,6th Florida Infantry Regiment...Pvt. Jesse S. Sutton. He and 3 other members of his Regiment are buried at Otter Creek Methodist Church Cemetery in Ponce de Leon,Florida.

IMG_20180412_181949705.jpg
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
This forum needs some action.

My ancestor from Co. I,6th Florida Infantry Regiment...Pvt. Jesse S. Sutton. He and 3 other members of his Regiment are buried at Otter Creek Methodist Church Cemetery in Ponce de Leon,Florida.

View attachment 185491

Chickamagua after battle report:

Report of Col. J. J. Finley, Sixth Florida Infantry.

HDQRS. SIXTH REGT. FLORIDA VOLUNTEERS,
Near Chattanooga, Tenn., September 25, 1863.
CAPT.: I have the honor to submit the following report of the
part taken by my regiment in the battle of the Chickamauga on
Saturday and Sunday, the 19th and 20th instant:

On the morning of the 19th, soon after we had crossed the
Chickamauga Creek, the regiment was thrown into line of battle
with the other regiments of the brigade in an open field, with the
enemy's batteries some distance in our front, but sufficiently near
to shell us with effect. Here, by order of the brigade
commander, Col. Trigg, our line was formed on a depression in
the field for cover from the enemy's fire. Notwithstanding this
precaution, the while of my line was subjected over, and near,
diagonally in many places from right to left, frequently striking
in front and ricochetting over my men, who were in a lying
position.

It was at this time that a shell from the enemy's guns exploded
upon the right of the third company, instantly killing First Lieut.
James Harys, then in command of his company, and his first
sergeant, S. F. Staunton, and also Second Sergt. W. R. F.
Potter, and wounding Lieut. W. S. Simmons on the left of the
second company, commanded by Capt. White.

The brigade was then ordered farther in front and my regiment
put in position for the support of [Peoples'] battery upon the
crest of a ridge. Here we were four about two hours subjected
to a heavy fire of shot and shell without any casualty.

We remained in this position until about 3.30 p. m., when the
whole brigade was ordered to advance to the relief of
[Robertson's] brigade, of Hood's division, which had for some
time been engaging the enemy about half a mile in front. This
advance was made under a heavy fire of the enemy's batteries
until we reached an open cornfield in front of my regiment,
where the fire became now hot and galling.

At this moment the order for a general advance was given and
my regiment moved forward through the open field at a
double-quick to the crest of the ridge the distance of about 300
yards under a raking fire from a battery of the enemy which was
posted on my left, as well as from small-arms and sharpshooters
in front. When the crest of the ridge was attained, which brought
us within about 60 yards of the enemy's advance, another battery
in our front, and still another diagonally to our right, opened a
hot and fierce fire upon us, still aided by the battery upon our
left, which kept up without intermission an enfilading fire upon
my whole line, which told with terrible effect upon my
command.

After engaging the enemy in this position for about half an hour
without any support whatever, we were ordered to retire by the
colonel commanding the brigade, who advanced with my
regiment in the charge, witnessed its conduct, and also fully
apprehended the necessity of falling back to prevent the utter
annihilation of the whole regiment.

While engaged with the enemy form the crest of the ridge, his
battery in our front was not more than 150 yards from our
lines, and upon our first arrival in this position some of his
infantry were not more than 50 yards in our front. From his
point we poured in a well-directed fire upon the infantry and the
gunners in our front, which soon drove them back to the
rifle-pits in rear of their battery (which I estimated to be about
150 yards in rear of their battery), leaving the guns unmanned
and the battery flag cut down. At this moment, if my regiment
could have been supported, I am of the opinion that my brigade
commander could have made a successful charge upon the other
two of the enemy's batteries, which had been playing upon us
with terrible effect from our first advance to our final retirement.
My failure to receive support will be properly accounted for,
doubtless, in the report of my brigade commander.

The casualties of the regiment in the battle on the 19th briefly
sum up as follows, to wit:

Officers and men. K. W. T.
Officers............. 2 11 13
Enlisted men......... 33 119 152
Total........... 35 130 165

K=Killed. W=Wounded. T=Total.

I cannot conclude the report of the part taken by my regiment in
the battle of this day without bearing testimony to the firmness,
courage, and constancy which they exhibited under one of the
fiercest and hottest fires which it has ever been the fortune of a
command to encounter. But I need not enlarge upon this, as my
brigade commander witnessed its conduct from the beginning to
the end of this trying day, and will do ample justice to my brave
and heroic officers and men in the report which he will be called
upon to make. With him I leave my command, who have
purchased whatever reputation they may have von upon the
sanguinary field at fearful cost of life and blood.

I have no particular case of gallantry to mention upon this day.
Where all fought with so much valor it would be invidious to
discriminate.

In regard to the battle of the 20th, I have the honor to report that
while First Florida Cavalry (dismounted) and the Seventh Florida
Infantry were detached, and while the colonel commanding the
brigade was with them to direct their movements, I was ordered
forward with the Sixth Florida Regt. and Fifty-fourth Virginia
Regt. to relieve Gen. Gregg's and Col. Kelly's brigades, which
had for some time been closely engaging the enemy on
Chickamauga Heights. With these regiments I moved forward
with haste to the point indicated, and taking the formation which
was supposed to give me the most desirable front to the enemy,
we advanced with steadiness and in good order until we passed
the pickets thrown in front of Gen. Gregg's and Kelly's brigades,
and opening fire upon the enemy we continued to advance
steadily and constantly until we swept the heights, silencing the
fire of our adversary, driving him from his position, and causing
him to retire. For a part of the time during our advance we were
exposed to a hot fire not only from small-arms and a battery in
front, but also from a battery
which was upon our right in an oblique direction.
At this moment I ordered the firing to cease, and
the guns to be loaded and bayonets fixed, in order to take the
gun which had been playing upon our front, but before this could
be accomplished the enemy had retired and succeeded in
withdrawing his piece.

At this time, the colonel commanding the brigade came up with
the Seventh Florida Regt., and having learned upon the way the
position and situation of the enemy, quickly and promptly made
a disposition of his forces, and ordered a movement by which
some 500 of the enemy were captured, besides a large number
of small-arms.

In this engagement the casualties in my regiment were as
follows, to wit: Killed, 1 private; wounded, 2 lieutenants, 4
privates; total, 6 wounded; missing, 1 private, supposed killed.

During the operations of this day I cannot speak too highly of the
good conduct and gallantry of both the officers and men of the
Fifty-fourth Virginia Regt., commanded by Lieut. Col. John J.
Wade. For my own regiment I can pay them no higher and no
more deserved compliments than to say that they fully sustained
the reputation which they so dearly earned in the bloody conflict
of the day before.

I have the honor to submit the forgoing report, which has been
written in great haste at night upon the field, and under
circumstances of the greatest inconvenience.

J. J. FINLEY,
Col., Comdg.

Capt. JAMES BENAGH,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 435-51 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. [CHAP. XLII.
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 51.]
 

bdtex

Major General
★★ Sr. Moderator
Silver Patron
Annual Winner
Regtl. Quartermaster Chickamauga 2018 Vicksburg 2019
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Location
Texas
I've walked very near the ground they advanced over at Viniard Field. They were at Missionary Ridge too. Going there in October.
 

bdtex

Major General
★★ Sr. Moderator
Silver Patron
Annual Winner
Regtl. Quartermaster Chickamauga 2018 Vicksburg 2019
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Location
Texas

Similar threads

Top