58th & 60th North Carolina Infantry Regiment

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#1
2 regiments with a somewhat shared career

The 58th North Carolina organized in July of 1862. It initially had 12 companies instead of usual 10. In September, moved to the Cumberland Gap, spending the winter in Eastern Tennessee. Joined Buckner's division and was part of Colonel John H. Kelly's provisional brigade at Chickamauga. At Chattanooga, the regiment would be assigned to Alexander Reynold's Brigade, still part of Buckner's/Bushrod Johnson's division. Remained with Army of Tennessee as part of Carter Stevenson's division. Fought at Reseca, Kolb's Farm, and Atlanta (Bald Hill). Detached from brigade during the Battle of Nashville. Moved with the detachment of the AoT to the Carolinas and fought at Bentonville (where it reportedly fielded 300 "effectives"; this may have include the 60th North Carolina as well). It surrendered with the army on the 26th April of 1865.
It commanding officers were:
Colonel: John B. Palmer;
Ltc.: William W. Proffit (Resigned 1863); replaced first by Adjutant Edmund Kirby of Virginia, until his death at Chickamauga; Maj. Thomas J. Dula would be promoted to Ltc. 14th August 1864, before resigning to 29th; Maj. S. M. Silver promoted from Major in September '64, resigned in March of '65; Final Ltc. was Thaddeus M. Coleman of the 10th North Carolina Artillery
Maj.: John C. Keener (Also resigned 1863); A. T. Stewart, killed at Jonesborough, 31st August 1864; G. W.F. Harper, promoted in November '64.

The 60th North Carolina originated as the 6th North Carolina Battalion. In summer of 1862, 4 companies added to raise the Battalion to a Regiment (note: since this addition was performed at Greensville, Tennessee, a handful of Tennessean were assigned to the regiment).
Assigned to Preston's brigade in Breckinridge's division, taking part in the Battle of Murfreesboro. At the start of 1663, the regiment numbered 276. The regiment, now under Stovall, fought at Chickamauga, losing 8 killed, 26 wounded, and 16 missing out of 150 men. In December, they numbered just 106 men, of which 59 were armed. In January of 1865, only 106 remained.
It commanding officers were:
Colonel: Joseph A. McDowell; Washington M. Hardy, promoted 10th June 1863
Ltc.: James T. Weaver; also: William H. Deaver and J. M. Ray
Maj.: William W. McDowell; James T. Huff
 

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#2
Colonel John B. Palmer, 58th North Carolina
"He was born October 13, 1826, in Plattsburg, Clinton County, New York. His father was John Palmer, a two-term Congressional representative, and his mother was Charlotte Theresa Sailly. John B. Palmer moved to Detroit, Michigan, c.1850, and to western North Carolina c.1858. He was extremely wealthy. Palmer became colonel of the 58th North Carolina Troops in 1862, and was wounded during the battle of Chickamauga, Georgia. In 1864 he became commander of the Department of Western North Carolina and had his headquarters in Asheville. He was superseded By General Martin in 1865. After the war, Palmer moved to Columbia, South Carolina, was president of two banks, and vp of a railroad (Atlantic Coastline). He died December 10, 1893, in Florida, and is buried in Columbia, South Carolina. His wife was Francis Marvin Kirby. She was from Michigan. I have a lot of information on him, but some huge gaps also. He had several relatives in the Union army including Colonel William E. Haynes of Ohio; Major Buel Palmer, 16th New York; Lt. Col. Frank Palmer, 16th New York; and 2nd Lt. Charles L. Palmer, 2nd New York Veteran Cav." https://www.ancestry.com/boards/thr...rtham.usa.states.northcarolina.counties.avery
 
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#3
Colonel Washingtom M. Hardy, 60th North Carolina
(From article by Michael C. Hardy, distant relative of the Colonel, also the author of the Palmer excerpt above)
"Washington Morris Hardy was born February 8, 1835, in Buncombe County, North Carolina. His father was Dr. J. F. E. Hardy, the noted Asheville physician. His mother was Jane Patton. Washington was educated as a lawyer prior to the war.

With the dissolution of the Union, and the prospect of war at hand, Washington joined the Buncombe Riflemen on April 27, 1861. Washington was elected 1st Lieutenant on the same day. The riflemen became Company E, 1st North Carolina Volunteers, also known as the "Bethel Regiment" for their participation in the battle of Big Bethel, Virginia, in June 1861. Washington was mustered out of service on November 12-13, 1861.

Returning home, Washington commenced raising a new company. On January 27, 1862, he was appointed captain of the Buncombe Light Artillery. Hardy’s company became Company A, 60th North Carolina Troops, and on March 1, 1863, he was appointed major, to date from February 21. On June 10, 1863, Hardy was promoted to colonel of the 60th NCT, to rank from May 14, 1863. According to the troop books, Hardy was with his regiment in May and June 1863, and November 1, 1863, until August 23, 1864. However, it appears that Maj. James T. Weaver was in command of the regiment during the battle of Chattanooga. The troop books also state that Hardy went home on leave on August 23, 1864, and that there is no further record. That it not exactly true.

During part of the Atlanta Campaign, Hardy is listed as in command of Reynold’s brigade (AofT). During the Carolinas Campaign, Hardy commanded a brigade composed of the 7th North Carolina Reserves, the 10th North Carolina Battalion, and the 50th North Carolina Troops. On March 31, 1865, he is listed as being back in command of the 60th North Carolina. However, once the 58th and 60th NCT are consolidated (on April 9, 1865), Hardy is not listed as the commanding officer.

Washington married Rebecca Carson. After the war, he worked as either a librarian, or assistant in the documents room for the United States House of Representatives. Hardy died in Spartanburg, South Carolina, in March 1880. His simple obit, in the March 31, 1880 edition of the Carolina Spartan, read:

Col. W. M. Hardy died last Sunday night at the residence of Mrs. Carson of this place. He was a native of Asheville, a son of Dr. Hardy. For several years he has been in Washington. His health failing, he returned to the South a few months ago. He was continued in his room several weeks. He was buried in the Episcopal Church yard Tuesday evening."
http://michaelchardy.blogspot.com/2008/02/col-washington-m-hardy.html
 
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#5
Ltc. James T. Weaver, 60th North Carolina
"
James Thomas Weaver was born in Buncombe County on November 30, 1828. He was a farmer​

by occupation before enlisting in the Buncombe Light Artillery during the winter of 1861-62.​

This unit was mustered in as “First Company,” McDowell’s Battalion North Carolina Infantry​

(known also as the 6th Battalion North Carolina Infantry) on April 12, 1862 at Asheville.​

It was redesignated the 60th North Carolina Regiment on October 8, 1862.​

Weaver was elected 2nd Lieutenant on April 12, 1862, and had advanced to Captain on March 1, 1863 –​

He was appointed Major and transferred to regimental staff in October 1863, due to his​

“cool and gallant conduct in the late battle of Chickamauga.” He was promoted to​

Lieutenant-Colonel on December 23, 1863, and assigned to conscription​

duty in North Carolina through the end of February 1864.​

Returning fro duty with his regiment, Weaver was killed in action during General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s​

attack upon the enemy at Murfreesboro, Tennessee on December 7, 1864. Captain Thomas Patton​

of Company C wrote of Weaver: “How often when the balls were thickest and the shells​

shrieked the loudest, have we heard his voice….”Steady boys, there’s no danger….”​

[H]e was the most perfectly cool, self-possessed man I ever saw.”​

"
http://www.ncwbts150.com/NorthCarolinaPatriotsof61.php
1551401063544.png
 
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#6
Colonel Washingtom M. Hardy, 60th North Carolina
(From article by Michael C. Hardy, distant relative of the Colonel, also the author of the Palmer excerpt above)
"Washington Morris Hardy was born February 8, 1835, in Buncombe County, North Carolina. His father was Dr. J. F. E. Hardy, the noted Asheville physician. His mother was Jane Patton. Washington was educated as a lawyer prior to the war.

With the dissolution of the Union, and the prospect of war at hand, Washington joined the Buncombe Riflemen on April 27, 1861. Washington was elected 1st Lieutenant on the same day. The riflemen became Company E, 1st North Carolina Volunteers, also known as the "Bethel Regiment" for their participation in the battle of Big Bethel, Virginia, in June 1861. Washington was mustered out of service on November 12-13, 1861.

Returning home, Washington commenced raising a new company. On January 27, 1862, he was appointed captain of the Buncombe Light Artillery. Hardy’s company became Company A, 60th North Carolina Troops, and on March 1, 1863, he was appointed major, to date from February 21. On June 10, 1863, Hardy was promoted to colonel of the 60th NCT, to rank from May 14, 1863. According to the troop books, Hardy was with his regiment in May and June 1863, and November 1, 1863, until August 23, 1864. However, it appears that Maj. James T. Weaver was in command of the regiment during the battle of Chattanooga. The troop books also state that Hardy went home on leave on August 23, 1864, and that there is no further record. That it not exactly true.

During part of the Atlanta Campaign, Hardy is listed as in command of Reynold’s brigade (AofT). During the Carolinas Campaign, Hardy commanded a brigade composed of the 7th North Carolina Reserves, the 10th North Carolina Battalion, and the 50th North Carolina Troops. On March 31, 1865, he is listed as being back in command of the 60th North Carolina. However, once the 58th and 60th NCT are consolidated (on April 9, 1865), Hardy is not listed as the commanding officer.

Washington married Rebecca Carson. After the war, he worked as either a librarian, or assistant in the documents room for the United States House of Representatives. Hardy died in Spartanburg, South Carolina, in March 1880. His simple obit, in the March 31, 1880 edition of the Carolina Spartan, read:

Col. W. M. Hardy died last Sunday night at the residence of Mrs. Carson of this place. He was a native of Asheville, a son of Dr. Hardy. For several years he has been in Washington. His health failing, he returned to the South a few months ago. He was continued in his room several weeks. He was buried in the Episcopal Church yard Tuesday evening."
http://michaelchardy.blogspot.com/2008/02/col-washington-m-hardy.html
I have ancestors that were in Hardy's brigade at Bentonville, two grandfathers in 10th battalion and an uncle in the 50th.
 

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#7
Colonel Washingtom M. Hardy, 60th North Carolina
(From article by Michael C. Hardy, distant relative of the Colonel, also the author of the Palmer excerpt above)
"Washington Morris Hardy was born February 8, 1835, in Buncombe County, North Carolina. His father was Dr. J. F. E. Hardy, the noted Asheville physician. His mother was Jane Patton. Washington was educated as a lawyer prior to the war.

With the dissolution of the Union, and the prospect of war at hand, Washington joined the Buncombe Riflemen on April 27, 1861. Washington was elected 1st Lieutenant on the same day. The riflemen became Company E, 1st North Carolina Volunteers, also known as the "Bethel Regiment" for their participation in the battle of Big Bethel, Virginia, in June 1861. Washington was mustered out of service on November 12-13, 1861.

Returning home, Washington commenced raising a new company. On January 27, 1862, he was appointed captain of the Buncombe Light Artillery. Hardy’s company became Company A, 60th North Carolina Troops, and on March 1, 1863, he was appointed major, to date from February 21. On June 10, 1863, Hardy was promoted to colonel of the 60th NCT, to rank from May 14, 1863. According to the troop books, Hardy was with his regiment in May and June 1863, and November 1, 1863, until August 23, 1864. However, it appears that Maj. James T. Weaver was in command of the regiment during the battle of Chattanooga. The troop books also state that Hardy went home on leave on August 23, 1864, and that there is no further record. That it not exactly true.

During part of the Atlanta Campaign, Hardy is listed as in command of Reynold’s brigade (AofT). During the Carolinas Campaign, Hardy commanded a brigade composed of the 7th North Carolina Reserves, the 10th North Carolina Battalion, and the 50th North Carolina Troops. On March 31, 1865, he is listed as being back in command of the 60th North Carolina. However, once the 58th and 60th NCT are consolidated (on April 9, 1865), Hardy is not listed as the commanding officer.

Washington married Rebecca Carson. After the war, he worked as either a librarian, or assistant in the documents room for the United States House of Representatives. Hardy died in Spartanburg, South Carolina, in March 1880. His simple obit, in the March 31, 1880 edition of the Carolina Spartan, read:

Col. W. M. Hardy died last Sunday night at the residence of Mrs. Carson of this place. He was a native of Asheville, a son of Dr. Hardy. For several years he has been in Washington. His health failing, he returned to the South a few months ago. He was continued in his room several weeks. He was buried in the Episcopal Church yard Tuesday evening."
http://michaelchardy.blogspot.com/2008/02/col-washington-m-hardy.html
CDV of Col. Washington M. Hardy
10405573_847202352034106_744543837200527529_n-copy-jpg.jpg

https://www.cowanauctions.com/lot/60114/
 

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#8
11953469_483597415144607_2174407022790306435_o.jpg

Captain William Robert Alexander, Company I (the "French Broad Guards"), 60th Regiment N.C. Troops

On April 18, 1861, the “Buncombe Rifles” became Buncombe County’s first company to leave for war, departing Asheville less than a week after the firing on Fort Sumter. The “Rifles” had organized in December 1859 following John Brown’s raid on the U.S. Arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, and thus themen were armed, uniformed, and at least partly drilled. Three days were required to march the nearly seventy miles to the nearest railhead at Icard Station near Morganton. Two more days of train travel brought the company to Raleigh, where on May 13 it was mustered into the 1st Regiment N.C. Volunteers as Company E.

Among the ninety-nine members of the “Rifles” was Private William Robert Alexander (1840-March 7, 1923), who farmed with his parents near Swannanoa. Alexander served with the 1st N.C. Volunteers until the regiment disbanded on November 11-12, 1861. Many members of the “Rifles” enlisted in the spring of 1862 in several Buncombe County companies that later became part of the 60th Regiment N.C. Troops. On May 15, 1862, Roberts mustered in as first sergeant of the future Company K of the 60th North Carolina, but was elected first lieutenant in September 1862 and transferred to Company I, also known as the “French Broad Guards.”

Extant muster rolls for Company I cover the period from November 1, 1862, through August 1864, and, with the exception of an illness in early 1863, Alexander is reported present on all of them. He was reported in command of the company on June 30, 1863, and led the “Guards” for the remainder of the war, receiving a promotion to captain in August 1864. Alexander was wounded in the hand at the Battle of Chickamauga, September 20, 1863.

The 60th North Carolina was among that portion of the Army of Tennessee ordered into eastern North Carolina in early 1865 to help counter the advancing Federal armies commanded by General William T. Sherman. The regiment fought at the Battle of Bentonville, March 19-21, 1865. A morning report dated March 28, 1865, reported only fourteen officers and fifty-nine enlisted men present for duty with the 60th North Carolina. On April 9, the regiment was consolidated with its sister regiment, the 58th North Carolina, and Alexander was placed in command of Company E. The new unit, known variously as the 58th North Carolina Regiment (Consolidated) and the 58th North Carolina Battalion, was among the Confederate units surrendered by General Joseph Johnston to General Sherman on April 26, 1865. Captain Alexander is reported present on a muster roll of officers and men paroled at Greensboro between April 26 and May 1.

The image depicts Alexander as an enlisted man in a single-breasted dark frock coat with three large buttons on each cuff, almost certainly the antebellum uniform coat of the “Buncombe Rifles.” A musket rests casually on his lap. Also visible are a rectangular belt plate with spread eagle device and the ivory grip and knight’s head pommel of a militia staff officer’s sword.

Captain Alexander is buried at the Piney Grove Cemetery, Swannanoa, Buncombe County.

https://www.facebook.com/321689201335430/photos/a.395219640649052/483597415144607/?type=3&theater
 

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