4th Great-Grandfather was in Sherman's March

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW:REGISTER HERE!
Joined
Aug 5, 2019
Messages
14
Location
Denver Area
Did some digging and found out last night that my 4th great-grandfather, Francis Marion Wood, joined the Union Army in 1864, at the tender age of 16 (he lied about his age, of course). He was in Company H, 70th Regiment, of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry (OVI). He was then with that unit through the end of the war, and survived until the 1930s. Pretty cool to learn, and I just ordered on Amazon an obscure history of that 70th regiment. Very excited to read it when it comes in. I also now want to read more about Sherman's March.

I'm sure others out there have relatives part of the march — looks like it was 60K strong. Would love to hear from you!

FM.jpg
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,659
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Did some digging and found out last night that my 4th great-grandfather, Francis Marion Wood, joined the Union Army in 1864, at the tender age of 16 (he lied about his age, of course). He was in Company H, 70th Regiment, of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry (OVI). He was then with that unit through the end of the war, and survived until the 1930s. Pretty cool to learn, and I just ordered on Amazon an obscure history of that 70th regiment. Very excited to read it when it comes in. I also now want to read more about Sherman's March.

I'm sure others out there have relatives part of the march — looks like it was 60K strong. Would love to hear from you!

View attachment 319600
Congratulations on your find, and welcome. If Francis joined in early '64, he was probably in these engagements:


Report of Capt. Henry L. Philips, Seventieth Ohio Infantry, of Operations
August 4-September 3.

HDQRS. SEVENTIETH OHIO INFANTRY.
East Point, Ga., September 9, 1864.
SIR: I have the honor to report the operations of this command
from the 4th day of August, 1864, to the 3d day-of September, 1864,
inclusive:

On the 4th the regiment occupied a line of works in reserve to the
brigade, where we remained until the 9th, when we advanced and
occupied a line in reserve to the left of the First Iowa Battery. On
the 11th four companies were sent to the front and left of the brigade
line, and regularly relieved until the 14th, when the whole regiment
was advanced to that line, forming the left of the line of the First
Brigade, connecting with the right of the Second Brigade, of this
division. This position was an unfortunate one, as it was constantly
exposed to the fire of the enemy's battery on its left flank, enfilading
the entire line of the regiment. The line had to be approached
through saps, and the men were compelled to dig holes in the ground
in rear to protect themselves from the effects of the enemy's shells.
Notwithstanding all the precaution possible we had 6 enlisted men
killed, and 2 commissioned officers and 28 enlisted men wounded.
We remained in this position until the evening of the 26th, when we
withdrew and marched to the right on the Sandtown road. Leaving
the Sandtown road, we marched toward the Atlanta and West Point
Railroad and camped in the woods on the night of the 27th. On the
28th we marched to the railroad, and, in connection with the brigade,
destroyed the railroad for three miles and camped. On the 29th we
remained in camp. On the 30th we marched to near Jonesborough,
Ga., and at night threw up works within 200 yards of the enemy's
main line. On the 31st the enemy made a reconnaissance in force,
and approached in view of the right of our line, but were easily
repulsed.

We remained in this position until September 2, when we were
ordered to pursue the enemy, and marched six miles south of Jonesborough,
Ga., and fortified a position in front and right of our brigade,
in full view of the rebel lines. On the 3d we received the
welcome news that Atlanta was ours.

All the officers and men acquitted themselves to my entire satisfaction.

Our losses since the 26th of August are 1 commissioned officer killed,
1 commissioned officer and 3 enlisted men wounded.

I cannot close this report without adverting to the great loss the
regiment has sustained in the death of its adjutant, First Lieut.
Andrew Urban. He was killed on the 3d instant, while communicating
the glorious news of the evacuation of Atlanta by the enemy
and its occupation by our forces. He was shot by a sharpshooter,
a minie-ball passing through his chest. He exclaimed, "Oh! boys,
I am killed," and instantly expired. Thus fell the model adjutant,
the brave and faithful soldier, and generous friend. The regiment
mourns his loss.

A list of casualties is herewith submitted.*

I am, captain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. L. PHILIPS,
Capt., Seventieth Ohio Veteran Volunteers.

Capt. JOHN CAMPBELL,
A. A. A. G. 1st Brig., 4th Div. 15th Army Corps.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.--ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. PAGE 312-74
[Series I. Vol. 38. Part III, Reports. Serial No. 74.]

***********************************************************************************


Report of Maj. William B. Brown, Seventieth Ohio Infantry, of
operations July 22.

HDQRS. SEVENTIETH OHIO VETERAN VOLUNTEERS,
Before Atlanta, Ga., July 24, 1864.
SIR: I have the honor to submit to you the following report of
the operations of the Seventieth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry
on the 22d day of July, 1864:

On the morning of the 22d this regiment had on the skirmish line
in front of the Third Brigade, Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army
Corps, forty men, commanded by Capt. Watson Foster. Early in
the day the skirmish line advanced to take the enemy's works,
from which they were falling back, and Capt. Foster was severely
wounded in the left leg and had to be carried from the field. I was
ordered by Col. Oliver, commanding the brigade, to move my
regiment forward to the enemy's works, some 400 yards south of
the railroad from Atlanta to Decatur, and change them-to operate
in the direction of Atlanta. About noon firing commenced on the
left and rear of the Army of the Tennessee. The firing increased
rapidly and the regiment was ordered to be ready for action, and in a
few moments was ordered to move southeast to meet the advance, as
the firing indicated that the enemy were gaining ground, but before
reaching the scene of action was ordered to return to the line of
works which we had changed, and about 500 or 600 yards from the
railroad, and the opposite side from which we had occupied, to hold
that position until another regiment could reach that point; and as
soon as relieved moved toward the railroad, but before reaching
that point a captain on general staff requested Gen. Harrow
to send a regiment to the point where the enemy were heavily
engaging the Seventeenth Army Corps, which the general did, and
ordered me to report to Col. Walcutt, commanding Second Brigade,
which was then engaging the enemy. Col. Walcutt ordered
the regiment held in support, but was soon ordered to the
works, some 500 yards south of the railroad, to meet a column advancing
from the direction of Atlanta. The regiment soon became
engaged, and the firing was very heavy along the entire line for
some time, but the line on our right began to waver, and Capt.
Campbell, of Col. Oliver's staff, brought the order to fall back
to the works from which the advance had been made in the morning.
The regiment was formed out of the works to march to the
point indicated, but before the regiment had entirely filed away
from the works I saw Gen. Harrow and sent Capt. Summers
to him for instructions, and, finding that he wished the works
held, I ordered the regiment to return double-quick to the position
from which it had just been ordered. This order was received by
the regiment with great cheering. The enemy's advance were
driven back, and for some distance on our right the lines were
again established in the works, but the enemy rallied and charged
again with greater desperation, and the musketry became a perfect
crash, and our entire line to the right of the Seventieth Ohio Veteran
Volunteer Infantry, so far as we could see, gave way, and the
enemy took possession of their works, and the advance reached a
point some 200 yards in the rear of the works on our right. I
brought two companies from the left of the regiment to the right,
and formed all the detachments that I could collect at right angles
to the line, and directed a fire against the advance and flank of the
enemy that had taken the works on our right. The regiment held
its position without wavering, and at frequent periods gave tremendous
cheers, and kept up the most terrific crash of musketry
that I ever heard from any regiment, until the enemy were driven
back in confusion, and the line again established. I do not pretend
to say what the result would have been had the Seventieth Ohio
Veteran Volunteer Infantry fallen back, but do say that both officers
and men are entitled to great credit for their gallant conduct under
such trying circumstances.

Capt. J. F. Summers, acting field officer, was ordered, about the
time the firing commenced, to take charge of the skirmish line of the
division, but reported to the regiment as soon as the skirmish line
was brought back to the works, and was with me during the hottest
of the battle, rendering me valuable assistance, and distinguished
himself for gallantry in this, as well as in other engagements.

My adjutant, Lieut. Andrew Urban, was with me during the
entire engagement, giving me valuable aid, and distinguished himself
for gallantry at every point in which the regiment was engaged.

Lieut. Charles A. Grimes, regimental quartermaster, was, in complience
with orders, in charge of his train.

Surg. Robert L. von Harlingon's health prevented him from being
with the regiment, but as far as his health permitted, he rendered
valuable service in the hospital as an operator.

Lieut. Townsend Heaton, Company B, in the absence of the
surgeon, fulfilled the duties in manner highly creditable to himself.

Capts. Louis Love, James Drennin, John C. Nelson, and James
Brown displayed great coolness and bravery in handling their companies
throughout the entire engagement.

First Lieuts. Walter S. Cox, William C. Marlatt, David A. Dodd,
Richard McKee, Marquis de L. Hare, John W. Kropp, and William
F. McDaniel, and Second Lieut. George W. Buesart performed
their duties with coolness and bravery highly commendable.

Casualties: Commissioned officers-wounded, 2. Enlisted menkilled,
4; wounded, 9; missing, 6. Aggregate loss, 21.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. B. BROWN,
Maj., Comdg. Seventieth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infty.

Capt. H. L. PHILIPS,
A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 4th Div., 15th Army Corps.


--------------------------------------------------------------

Reports of Capt. Louis Love, Seventieth Ohio Infantry, of operations
May 6-August 3.

HDQRS. SEVENTIETH OHIO VETERAN VOLUNTEERS,
Before Atlanta, Ga., August 6, 1864.
SIR: In compliance with circular, Hdqrs. First Brigade,
Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, I submit the following detailed
report of the operations of the Seventieth Ohio Veteran Volunteer
Infantry, since the 6th day of May, 1864:

The regiment composing part of the Third Brigade, Fourth Division,
Fifteenth Army Corps, left camp near Chattanooga and
marched to Resaca, where it took an active part in the operations of
that memorable engagement.

The rebels evacuated Resaca during the night of the 16th [15th];
started in pursuit the 17th [16th], and arrived in the neighborhood of
Kingston, May 19, where we rested three days. Left camp near Kingston,
May 23, and arrived near Dallas May 26. Moved forward, took
position on the morning of the 27th, and threw up works; skirmishing
continually in our front, sometimes very heavy. The enemy attempted
to turn the right of the division on the 28th; did not appear
in force on our front, although our skirmishers were driven in.

Received orders at 3 a. m., June 1, to get ready to move: moved
about daylight to near Dallas, remained two hours, then marched
to New Hope Church, relieving the Twentieth Army Corps. June
2, moved to the first line of works, relieving the Forty-eighth
Illinois. Relieved, June 3, by the Ninety-ninth Indiana. June 5,
we relieved the Forty-eighth Illinois, moving to the first line of
works. About daylight our skirmishers advanced and found that
the rebels had evacuated during the night. Captured 1 lieutenant
and 7 men. Started the same day in pursuit, marching about eight
miles. Arrived at Acworth, Ga., June 6, 1864, where we remained
three days. June 10, left Acworth, moved forward about five miles.
The regiment was ordered toward evening to go to right and find
Gen. Thomas' left. Had proceeded about half a mile when we
were ordered back. June 15, ordered, with the brigade, to the left.
The division formed in three lines of battle. Our regiment occupied
the left of the second line and was uncovered by the Second Brigade,
excepting skirmishers. At 3 o'clock the command forward was
given; the regiment moved across the field in fine style. Coming to
a wide ditch the men plunged in, waist deep, keeping the guns and
accouterments dry. Quickly reforming on the other side of the
ditch we pushed through a narrow strip of woods, lately occupied by
the enemy, to an open field, where we halted some ten minutes and
then pushed forward in support of the skirmishers. The division
being relieved by the Seventeenth Corps about dark we marched to
the rear. June 16, about noon we were ordered by Col. Oliver,
commanding Third Brigade, to relieve a regiment of the Second
Division on picket, covering the rear. Relieved on the 19th and
marched to the second line of works, to the left of the railroad,
where we remained in reserve until June 25, when we were ordered
and marched at dark, and about 11 o'clock relieved a regiment of
Gen. Jeff. C. Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Army Corps.

Occupied these works until July 3, when we started in pursuit of
the enemy, they having evacuated their strong position on Kenesaw
Mountain the night previous; arrived at Marietta about 11 o'clock.
July 5, arrived near the Chattahoochee River; took position on the
left of the Seventeenth Army Corps. July 7, the skirmish fire became
very heavy. About 11 p. m. the regiment was ordered forward
as supports and occupied a ridge in rear of the skirmishers, which
we fortified. July 10, the enemy evacuated their works during the
night. At 6 a. m. three companies of the Seventieth Ohio Veteran
Volunteer Infantry were ordered to advance, the balance of the regiment
in support. The skirmishers advanced to within 300 yards of
the river; the regiment took possession of the rebel works. July 11,
we deployed the regiment, in compliance with orders, so as to cover
half of the First Division front. July 12, relieved about 7 a. m. by
the Ninety-ninth Indiana. Marched at 5 p. m. in direction of Marietta.

July 14, crossed the Chattahoochee River and camped about
two miles from and south of the river, where we remained two days.
July 17, marched at 5.30 o'clock in direction of Atlanta. July 20,
marched through Decatur and took the road to Atlanta. Moved
very cautiously. When within three miles of Atlanta found the
enemy in force. The regiment here occupied the second line. July
22, the enemy evacuated their works during the previous night.
About 9 a. m. the regiment was ordered forward by Col. Oliver,
commanding Third Brigade, to the rifle-pits left by the enemy, with
instructions to remodel them to operate in the direction of Atlanta.
For the operations of the regiment during the battle I refer you to
Maj. Brown's official report inclosed.* July 26, received orders to
be ready to move at midnight; marched at the appointed time.
July 27, arrived about dark at the extreme right of the army. July
28, moved into position and had a terrible battle. Refer you to inclosed
official report.+ The regiment was during the battle, on the
left of the division.

August 2, moved at 12 o'clock to the second line of works. August
3, Maj. William B. Brown, commanding the regiment, detailed to
take charge of 900 men to charge the position held by the rebel
skirmishers. At 4 o'clock the command "forward" was given. His
men gained the ridge but he did not; he fell, pierced by a minieball
in the left side. When he reached the regiment he was unconscious,
and remained so until his death, which occurred about 8 p. m.
In the loss of the major the regiment has lost its noble leader, and
the country an officer that could illy be spared at the present moment.

Casualties from May 6 to August 3, 1864: Commissioned officers--killed,
3; wounded, 4. Enlisted men-killed, 10; died of wounds,
5; wounded, 50; missing, 10. Aggregate loss, 82.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LOUIS LOVE,
Capt., Comdg. Seventieth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty.

Capt. H. L. PHILIPS,
A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 4th Div., 15th Army Corps.

-----


HDQRS. SEVENTIETH OHIO VETERAN VOLUNTEERS,
Before Atlanta, Ga., August 6, 1864.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following, which is from the
pen of Maj. William B. Brown, in command of the regiment at the
time of the engagement, July 28, 1864:

HDQRS. SEVENTIETH OHIO VETERAN VOLUNTEERS,
Before Atlanta, Ga., July 3O, 1864,.
SIR: I have the honor to report to you that in the engagement on the 25th day
of July, 1864, the Seventieth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry occupied the left
flank of the Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army Corps. and connecting with the
right flank and nearly at right angles to the line of battle of the First
Division Fifteenth Army Corps, covering the flank of the First Division during
the maneuvers.

About the time the First Division came into position my regiment received a
heavy fire from the enemy and could not reply, as the skirmishers covering the
Fourth Division were ordered to connect with the skirmishers of the First
Division. I was satisfied that the enemy were so close that there must be a
break in the skirmish
line and ordered an officer and thirty men to cover my front, and notified
Col. Oliver, commanding brigade, who ordered me to send in compliance with
orders from Gen. Harrow, a company for their support, and the skirmish line
connected. The break in the skirmish line was the loss of connection in the
First Division. The Fourth Division moved forward to take the ridge in front,
which brought my regiment about 200 yards to the right and front of the First
Division, but finding that the First Division were not going to advance I threw
back the left of my regiment, to connect as nearly as possible the First and
Fourth Divisions. The enemy's skirmishers were driven back in our front, but
continued a brisk fire of musketry and occasionally artillery. The regiment
threw up temporary works of old logs and poles, and were strengthening those
feeble works when the enemy drove our skirmishers hack and charged forward with
great confidence.

The fighting then became general on our line, the enemy appearing
determined to drive us from our position. This column was
checked after a severe engagement, and our regiment had again
commenced strengthening the works when they were attacked the
second time with greater fury and numbers. The fighting now
became most terrific; the enemy pushed forward under our destructive
fire to within twenty-five paces of our lines and planted their
colors. This column was driven back about fifty yards, with the
loss of their colors, which were shot down, when they appeared to
rally on a second line, and made a most stubborn resistance. The
Seventieth Ohio Veteran Volunteers kept pouring a murderous fire
into the enemy, which kept them from advancing, although they
attempted it several times. About this time the gallant One hundred
and third Illinois Infantry came up to cover a gap that was between
the First and Fourth Divisions, their right overlapping the
left of the Seventieth Ohio. Shortly after the arrival of the One
hundred and third Illinois, the Forty-sixth Ohio Veteran Volunteers
came to our assistance, which resulted in soon driving the enemy
from our front in great confusion. The alacrity and gallantry displayed
by the officers and men of the One hundred and third Illinois
and Forty-sixth Ohio in relieving our exhausted ranks will endear
those regiments to us as long as memory exists. The fighting
ceased in our front about 5 o'clock, and soon one company from the
Seventieth Ohio Veteran Volunteers (Company H, Lieut. D. A.
Dodd commanding) and one company from the Forty-sixth Ohio
Veteran Volunteer Infantry, we redeployed as skirmishers, and advanced
some 200 yards to the front, where they remained during the
night.

The colors that were captured in our front were shot down by the
Seventieth Ohio Veteran Volunteers and brought in by a member of
the Forty-sixth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, who, I understand,
still retains them.

In the engagement of July 28 the gentlemanly and gallant Capt.
J. F. Summers, acting field officer, was killed while cheering and
encouraging the men. First Lieut. John W. Krepp was killed at
the close of the battle, after acquitting himself in the most gallant
manner. Capt. John C. Nelson was wounded on the skirmish line
at the commencement of the engagement; he also acquitted himself
with great credit.

The officers, in the language of our lamented major, "Acquitted
themselves to my entire satisfaction, without a single exception."
The following is a list present on the day of battle: Maj. William
B. Brown, commanding; Capt. J. F. Summers, acting field officer;
Lieut. Andrew Urban, adjutant; Capt. Louis Love, Company E;
Capt. James Drennin, Company F; Capt. John C. Nelson, Company
C; First Lieut. Walter S. Cox, Company D; First Lieut. M. de L.
Hare, Company A; First Lieut. R. McKee, Company C; First
Lieut. William F. McDaniel, Company G; First Lieut. David A.
Dodd, Company H; First Lieut. John W. Kropp, Company I;
First Lieut. William C. Marlatt, Company K; Second Lieut. George
W. Buesart, Company D; First Lieut. Townsend Heaton, Company
B, detailed in medical department.

I would like to mention every man who distinguished himself on
that day, but it would be too lengthy; it embraces the muster-rolls
of the entire regiment.

Casualties: Commissioned officers-killed, 2; wounded, 1. Enlisted
men-killed, 5; wounded, 18; missing, 4. Aggregate, 30.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LOUIS LOVE,
Capt., Comdg. Seventieth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty.

Capt. H. L. PHILIPS,
A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 4th Div., 15th Army Corps.
 

Ole Miss

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
2,783
Location
North Mississippi
Welcome from the Shiloh/Pittsburg Landing Forum and North Mississippi! Be sure and visit the Forum soon.
Regards
David
 

Potomac Pride

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 28, 2011
Messages
1,690
Location
Georgia
That is very interesting about your ancestor. The actions of Sherman's Army in Georgia limited the ability of the South to continue to fight which was an important factor that led to the Union victory.
 

privateflemming

Private
Joined
Jul 2, 2019
Messages
119
Location
California, USA
That's really interesting but I would be cautious about assuming this is necessarily your ancestor if you don't have any other confirmation like from family oral history. I've made that mistake before as shown in this post: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/what-is-your-current-genealogy-project.159090/page-4#post-2094238

There were often many people with the same names and from the same states and even the exact same age in the Civil War. You say you think he lied about his age, but maybe it was just a different person.
 
Joined
Aug 5, 2019
Messages
14
Location
Denver Area
That's really interesting but I would be cautious about assuming this is necessarily your ancestor if you don't have any other confirmation like from family oral history. I've made that mistake before as shown in this post: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/what-is-your-current-genealogy-project.159090/page-4#post-2094238

There were often many people with the same names and from the same states and even the exact same age in the Civil War. You say you think he lied about his age, but maybe it was just a different person.
Thanks for the note and the warning. It actually started as family oral history, which I confirmed by finding some records. I’m fairly certain it’s accurate. Certainly something to keep in mind as I keep digging in my genealogy though!
 
Top